Second Global Conference on Economic Geography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Beijing International Convention Center, China

 

25-28th June 2007


IGSNRR, Chinese Academy of Science

A leading research institution in economic geography in China

 

The Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research (IGSNRR), Chinese Academy of Science was established in 1999 by merging the Institute of Geography and the Commission of Integrated Survey of Natural Resources (established in 1940 and 1956, respectively). It is a leading research institution in geography and natural resources research in China, with more than 400 academic staffs. The Institute now offers M.S. and Ph.D. programs in human geography, physical geography, cartography & GIS, ecology, meteorology and environmental science, and, in 2007, accommodates nearly 500 registered postgraduate students.

 

Economic geography is one of the strengths of IGSNRR, and its recent development is featured by an emphasis on regional studies and regional planning as well as sustainable development, which is closely related to the demand from the Chinese government for solutions to regional issues. Being in a state-sponsored Institute, economic geographers at IGSNRR have been involved in many spatial planning projects organized by both the central and provincial governments in China. Many of them have become important consultants to various ministries of the Chinese government. Besides applied research, economic geographers at IGSNRR are also engaged in such research areas as economic globalization and its impacts on local development in China, spatial implications of new ICTs, firm-region nexus in the Chinese context, regional innovation system, physical infrastructures, and restructuring of state-owned enterprise and traditional industrial bases in China.

 

IGSNRR is also an important centre for training postgraduate students in economic geography in China, and enrols 10-15 new students in economic geography each year. In 2007, there are 40 postgraduate students at the Institute studying economic geography for a M.S. or a Ph.D.

 

IGSNRR welcomes collaborations with economic geographers all over the world.


SECOND GLOBAL CONFERENCE ON ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY

 

 

PROGRAMME AND ABSTRACTS

 

 

25-28 June 2007, Beijing International Convention Center, Beijing, China

Website: http://courses.nus.edu.sg/course/geoywc/conference/econgeog.html

 

Jointly Organized By

 

The Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China

 

And

 

The Department of Geography

National University of Singapore

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


In collaboration with the Geographical Society of China (conference secretariat), the Division of Geography, China National Natural Science Foundation, and economic geography study/research groups or the equivalent of the Association of American Geographers, the Royal Geographical Society-Institute of British Geographers, the Canadian Association of Geographers, the Institute of Australian Geographers, and the International Geographical Union Commission on the Dynamics of Economic Spaces and Commission on Local Development.



WELCOME ADDRESSES

 

On behalf of the Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research (IGSNRR), Chinese Academy of Sciences, I would like to extend my warmest welcome to all of you – participants in the Second Global Conference on Economic Geography. I believe your participation will make the conference a great success in promoting academic dialogues and debates among economic geographers all over the world. I also want to extend my deep thanks to the Department of Geography, National University of Singapore, for co-organizing the conference.

 

IGSNRR is a leading research institution in geography and natural resources research in China, and economic geography is one of our strengths. We are keen to develop collaborations in various forms with geographers from the rest of the world. I think that this conference will be a bridge for establishing academic links among all of you.

 

I sincerely hope that you would not only learn from each other in various conference sessions, but also take this opportunity to learn more about dynamic China and to have a look at the exciting sites of the 29th Olympic Games, which are just next to the conference venue. I cordially invite you to visit IGSNRR at your own convenience.

 

Enjoy your stay in Beijing in this beautiful season.

 

Jiyuan LIU

Professor and Director,

Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research

Chinese Academy of Sciences


WELCOME ADDRESSES

 

I am proud and honoured, on behalf of the Department of Geography, National University of Singapore (NUS), to welcome you to the Second Global Conference on Economic Geography in Beijing. I am grateful to the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) for co-organising the conference with us, and especially to Weidong Liu (CAS), Henry Yeung (NUS) and the rest of the Organising Committee for their hard work over the many months that it has taken to pull this event together.

Seven years after this global conference was inaugurated in Singapore in December 2000, it is indeed timely that we once again have the best minds in economic geography gathering together to engage in critical debates about the world economy and how economic geographers can contribute to advancing knowledge not only in Geography and the wider social sciences, but also in terms of policy implications. While the contexts of this second conference may have changed from those of the first, the conference’s objectives remain from those set seven years ago, and rightly so. Given the complexity of economic transformations across the globe, it is now more important than ever that geographers based in Asia and elsewhere continue to dialogue and debate across borders to advance the discipline of economic geography. In keeping with our global focus, we at NUS are keen to contribute actively to building academic bridges and establishing international collaborations across Southeast Asia, Asia and beyond, in terms of research and teaching; we are pleased that co-organising this conference has allowed us one such opportunity. We are always on the lookout for further opportunities to do so and invite you to think of Geography@NUS (Singapore) whether you are considering an international partner in Asia, contemplating a research project, or recommending a department to your students for graduate school.

While I am not able to be with you in Beijing, I would like to take this opportunity to wish the event every success. With such a sterling cast of paper presenters from across the globe, I am confident that everyone will leave the conference intellectually invigorated and enriched.

 

Shirlena Huang

Associate Professor and Head

Department of Geography

National University of Singapore

 

 


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

 

The organizers would like to thank the following organizations and institutions for their generous support and sponsorship of the conference.

 

Bureau of Personnel and Education, Chinese Academy of Sciences

 

China National Natural Science Foundation

 

Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences

 

Academic Research Fund, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, National University of Singapore

 

Economic Geography (Clark University)

 

Taylor & Francis Publishers

 

Wiley-Blackwell Publishers

 

Economic Geography Specialty Group, the Association of American Geographers

 

International Geographical Union Commission on the Dynamics of Economic Spaces

 

Regional Studies Association
CONTENTS

 

Welcome addresses                                                                      vi

 

Acknowledgements                                                                    viii

 

Information for participants                                                         x

 

Programme summary                                                                    1

 

Detailed programme                                                                      5

 

Abstracts (in alphabetical order of first authors’ surnames)      29

 

List of non-presenting participants                                          172

 

Session participant index                                                          173

 
INFORMATION FOR PARTICIPANTS

 

Conference Rationale

 

This is the sequel to the first highly successful Global Conference on Economic Geography held in Singapore, 5-9 December 2000. With almost 200 academic participants from 30 countries, the Singapore conference was significant in spurring on economic-geographical dialogue in a sustained manner worldwide. Some 150 high quality papers were presented and the conference resulted in two special issues in leading geographical journals (see JEG 2001, E&PA 2002, and editorial in E&PD 2001), as well as numerous other articles, chapters, and reports. In the context of the globalization of knowledge production and research activity, a global dialogue in economic geography continues to be highly important, for it facilitates the development of knowledge, and the establishment of international collaborative relations for both teaching and research. Such dialogue in a dedicated conference also requires economic geographers to face head on the complex issues of vantage points and ethnocentric biases, as evident in the intellectual interactions during the Singapore conference. Field trips organized in Beijing and elsewhere in China during the conference will enable participants to collect teaching materials (case studies, digital photos, etc) and to investigate possibilities for future research projects.

 

Six years have now lapsed since the Singapore conference. The global economy has experienced tremendous transformations since the late 1990s. For one, it witnesses much stronger integration of cross-border economic activities. The rise of emerging economies, particularly China and India, has significant economic-geographical implications. The continual economic integration within the European Union and the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) requires new research insights from economic geographers. At the more micro-scale, economic geographies are much more implicated in our everyday life, from our consumption practices and productive work to our activities in labour and financial markets. We believe the timing is now appropriate for a second global conference on economic geography. As one of the key sub-disciplines in Geography, it is time to discuss and debate current and new research agendas in economic geography. It is also a critical time to continue our rethinking of the relationship between the sub-discipline (within human geography) and the wider social science community.

 

In organizing this second global conference on economic geography, we have three specific objectives:

 

1. The conference will provide a forum for constructive cross-regional dialogue among economic geographers from all regions and countries. Such dialogue is critical for the advancement of the subject.

 

2. The conference will provide an opportunity for economic geographers from outside Asia to interact with geographers and other interested social scientists from within the host region. While acknowledging the Anglo-American influence in much of the recent work in economic geography, we recognize that there is a considerable stock of knowledge in the Asian region that contributes to our understanding of regional and global economic geographies. In short, the conference will enhance the global interdependence of networks of economic geographers.

 

3. The conference and its associated activities will enable economic geographers from outside the Asian region to experience (first-hand) the dynamics of economic transformations in China and East Asia. Through carefully designed field trips, both within and outside of Beijing, the capital city of China, the conference will offer insightful educational experiences that can be brought home for the benefits of students and institutions, similar to those available during the Singapore conference in 2000.

 

Conference Organizing Committee

 

Weidong Liu, Co-Chair, Chinese Academy of Sciences <liuwd@igsnrr.ac.cn>

Henry Yeung, Co-Chair, National University of Singapore <HenryYeung@nus.edu.sg>

Mary L. Ma, Conference Secretary, Chinese Academy of Sciences <mali@igsnrr.ac.cn>

Yuko Aoyama, Clark University (USA)

Neil Coe, University of Manchester (UK)

Martin Hess, University of Manchester (UK)

Jinn-Yuh Hsu, National Taiwan University

Philip Kelly, York University (Canada)

Yong-Sook Lee, National University of Singapore

Xiaojian Li, Henan University of Finance and Economics (China)

George Lin, University of Hong Kong

Kris Olds, University of Wisconsin, Madison (USA)

Jessie Poon, SUNY-Buffalo (USA)

Jici Wang, Peking University (China)

Yu Zhou, Vassar College (USA)

Guoyou Zhang, Secretary General of the Geographical Society of China

Local conference secretariat: Geographical Society of China

 

Conference Advisory Committee

 

Chuanjun Wu, Former Vice President of the International Geographical Union, and CAS Academician

Dadao Lu, President of the Geographical Society of China, and CAS Academician

Changming Liu, Vice President of the International Geographical Union, and CAS Academician

Bojie Fu, Director of Bureau of Science & Technology for Resources and the Environment, CAS

Yi Liu, Director of Bureau of Personnel and Education, CAS

Jiyuan Liu, Director of the Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, CAS

Jie Fan, Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, CAS

Changqing Song, Head of Geography Division, China National Natural Science Foundation

Lily Kong, Vice Provost, National University of Singapore

Shirlena Huang, Head, Department of Geography, National University of Singapore

Victor Savage, Department of Geography, National University of Singapore, and President, Commonwealth Geographical Bureau

Susan Hanson, Clark University (USA)

Gordon Clark, Oxford University (UK)

Gernot Grabher, University of Bonn (Germany)

 

Transport to/from the Conference Venue

 

Public transport

 

An airport shuttle bus is available, and the shuttle bus station is next to the taxi station. Please take Line 5 (a line to Zhongguancun) and drop off at the Beijing International Convention Center (i.e., Anhui Bridge stop). A one-way bus fare is RMB16 per person. It takes about 3 minutes to walk from the bus stop to the Beijing Continental Grand Hotel and 10 minutes to the Asian Games Village Hotel. A taxi is needed to go to the Beijing Foreign Experts Building Hotel from the bus stop and the taxi fare is about RMB10.

 


Taxis

 

Taxis are relatively cheap in Beijing. You can simply flag them down on the street with a waving arm/hand signal and instruct the driver using our pre-prepared direction card. Please ensure that the driver uses the fare metre and issues a receipt upon arrival at your destination.

 

Registration

 

Due to an extremely packed conference schedule, we strongly advise you to complete an early registration upon arrival at one of the three conference hotels – Beijing Continental Grand Hotel, Beijing Foreign Experts Building Hotel, and Asian Games Village Hotel. Early registration will be available in the lobby areas of all three conference hotels on Sunday 24 June 2007 from 10 am to 8 pm. Please look out for the Conference Registration Desk when you arrive at the hotel lobby. Our Conference Assistants will be available on site to advise you on conference-related matters.

 

If you are unable to register early for the conference on Sunday 24 June, formal registration will be available on the Ground Level of the conference venue – Beijing International Convention Center (BICC) – outside Hall No.3 on Monday 25 June 2007 between 8 am and 12 pm. Please look out for the Conference Registration Desk when you arrive at the BICC.

 

From 12 pm on Monday 25 June 2007, the Registration Desk will be moved to BICC Second Level next to the entrance to Rooms 2B-2C and it will be opened until 1 pm on Tuesday 26 June 2007.

 

Conference Secretariat

 

The Secretariat is located at the Conference Registration Desk in BICC. There will be someone to assist you if you have any queries during the conference. They will be able to contact the Organizing Committee.

 

Optional Fieldtrips

 

You may sign up for optional fieldtrips in Beijing with tour operators located next to the Conference Registration Desk in BICC on either Monday 25 June 2007 or Tuesday 26 June 2007.


Plenary Sessions

 

There are FOUR plenary lectures and ONE plenary panel session.

 

Monday 25 June 2007 9-10 am in Hall No.3 (After Opening Ceremony)

Plenary lecture: Professor Susan Hanson, Clark University, USA

 

Monday 25 June 2007 6:15-7 pm in Beijing Continental Grand Hotel Level 2 Banquet Hall

Plenary lecture: Professor Dadao Lu, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Followed by the Welcome Dinner

 

Tuesday 26 June 2007 6-7 pm in Hall No.3

Plenary lecture: Professor Gordon Clark, Oxford University, UK

Followed by a reception sponsored by Economic Geography

 

Thursday 28 June 2007 6-7 pm in Hall No.3

Plenary lecture: Professor Gernot Grabher, University of Bonn, Germany

 

Conference Receptions

 

Sunday 24 June 2007 7-9 pm at the Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (for Graduate Student Participants ONLY – information on pick-up time and location available at Registration Desks)

Sponsored by Geographical Postgraduate Union of China

 

Tuesday 26 June 2007 4-4:40 pm at the foyer outside Room Nos.2B/C

Sponsored by Routledge (UK)

 

Tuesday 26 June 2007 7-9 pm at the foyer outside Room Nos. 2B/C

Sponsored by Economic Geography (Clark University, USA)

 

Wednesday 27 June 2007 4-6 pm at the Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (after fieldtrips)

Sponsored by IGSNRR, Chinese Academy of Sciences

 

You are cordially invited to these receptions.

 


Lunches and Breaks

 

The conference registration fees include all buffet lunches from Monday 25 June 2007 to Thursday 28 June 2007. All lunches will be held in the Beijing Grand Continental Hotel Banquet Hall (Level 2), except on Wednesday 27 June 2007 when fieldtrips will be organized. There will be signs in the BICC indicating directions. Please feel free to approach any of our Conference Assistants if you have any queries.

 

Important note: Upon registration, you will be issued lunch tickets for each day. Due to security concerns, you MUST wear your conference badge and present a lunch ticket for entrance into the Banquet Hall.

 

All tea and coffee breaks will be served at the foyer areas outside Room Nos.2B/C.

 

Conference Fieldtrips

 

WEDNESDAY 27 JUNE 2007 (WHOLE DAY)

 

Important note: Upon registration, you will be issued a ticket for either fieldtrips based on your preference and/or allocation. Because of limited capacity reasons, we are unable to offer a change in your fieldtrip destination, but you are welcome to swap your ticket with another conference participant. Due to security concerns, you MUST wear your conference badge and present the ticket before you can board the coach on Wednesday morning.

 

1. Fieldtrip – Beijing Economic and Technological Development Area (BDA)

Organizers: Weidong Liu, Baoling Wang, and Fox Zhiyong Hu

 

The fieldtrip will commence with a brief introduction to BDA in the morning by an experienced scholar, who will set the research context and highlight some prominent economic-geographical issues related to BDA. This is followed by presentations by local hosting institution (i.e., the Management Committee of BDA), which will introduce both the industrial economy and urban planning of BDA. The remainder of the schedule after lunch consists of a bus tour in BDA and a visit to Nokia’s Xingwang Industrial Park in BDA. The Xingwang Park is one of the largest telecom-equipment manufacturing centres in the world, consisting of Nokia’s assembly plant and major suppliers as well as Nokia’s design centre. It has such interesting features as just-in-time delivery and virtual bonded area. See Liu, Dicken and Yeung (2005) in Urban Geography and Yeung, Liu and Dicken (2006) in World Development for more details about the Xingwang Industrial Park. The pick-up point for this trip is at the Beijing Continental Grand Hotel and the bus will leave at 8.30 am on Wednesday 27 June 2007. The same location will be used as the drop-off point in the late afternoon – it is expected to get back to BGCH before 4:30 pm. Immediately after the fieldtrip, there will be an optional visit to the Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources (IGSNRR), Chinese Academy of Sciences, for a simple reception (from 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm). The fieldtrip buses will service as the shuttle buses to IGSNRR.

 

2. Fieldtrip – Zhongguancun High-Tech Area

Organizers: Jici Wang, Yu Zhou, and Xin Tong

 

The fieldtrip includes a visit to Tsinghua University Science & Technology (S&T) Park and a bus tour to Zhongguancun Central Square in the morning, and then a visit to Shangdi IT Industrial Base in the afternoon. It will commence with briefings on the development of Zhongguancun, including: (1) an introduction to the role of universities in the development of this high-tech zone by the Director of Tsinghua University S&T Park; and (2) an introduction to the institutional and historical context in which Zhongguancun has been growing rapidly during the last two decades. The first stop of this trip, Tsinghua University S&T Park, is a science park run by a leading university in China (i.e., Tsinghua University), reflecting the relationship between university and industry in the development of high-tech clusters. The second stop, Zhongguancun Central Square, exemplifies strong government intervention in urban regeneration in the central area of Zhongguancun, which leads to a dramatic change in urban landscape in the last few years. The third stop, Shangdi IT Industrial Base, is an industrial zone planned by the government, which was originally intended to host IT manufacturing activities, but has since been changed to be an office work area because most IT manufacturing has moved to southern China. The pick-up point for this trip is at the Beijing Continental Grand Hotel and the bus will leave at 8.30 am on Wednesday 27 June 2007. The same location will be used as the drop-off point in the late afternoon – it is expected to get back to BGCH before 4 pm. Immediately after the fieldtrip, there will be an optional visit to the Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources (IGSNRR), Chinese Academy of Sciences, for a simple reception (from 4 pm to 5:30 pm). The fieldtrip buses will service as the shuttle buses to IGSNRR.


PROGRAMME SUMMARY

 

MONDAY 25 JUNE 2007

 

8:00 – 8:30 am

Registration

(Foyer, Ground Level next to Hall No.3, Beijing International Convention Center BICC)

 

8:30 – 9:00 am

Opening Session (Hall No.3)

 

9:00 – 10:00 am

Plenary Lecture (Hall No.3)

 

10:00 – 10:30 am

Tea Break (Foyer, Room Nos.2B/C)

 

10:30 – 12:30 pm

Session 1.1 Global finance 1 (Hall No.3)

 

 

Session 1.2 Dynamics of urban and regional development 1 (Room 2B)

 

 

Session 1.3 Reflections on social movements, spatiality, and strategy (Room 2C)

 

 

Session 1.4 Economic-geographical discourses 1

(Room 201-A)

 

 

Session 1.5 Innovation and knowledge dynamics 1

(Room 201-B)

 

 

Session 1.6 Economy and the environment 1

(Room 201-C)

 

12:30 – 1:30 pm

Buffet Lunch (Beijing Continental Grand Hotel BCGH Level 2 Banquet Hall)

 

1:30 – 3:30 pm

Session 1.7 Dynamics of urban and regional development 2 (Room 2B)

 

 

Session 1.8 Global finance 2 (Room 2C)

 

 

Session 1.9 Economic-geographical discourses 2

(Room 201-A)

 

 

Session 1.10 Innovation and knowledge dynamics 2 (Room 201-B)

 

 

Session 1.11 Economy and the environment 2

(Room 201-C)

 

3:30 – 4:00 pm

Tea Break (Foyer, Room Nos.2B/C)

 

4:00 – 6:00 pm

Session 1.12 Dynamics of urban and regional development 3 (Room 2B)

 

 

Session 1.13 Global finance 3 (Room 2C)

 

 

Session 1.14 Alternative economic geographies

(Room 201-A)

 

 

Session 1.15 Innovation and knowledge dynamics 3 (Room 201-B)

 

 

Session 1.16 Economy and the environment 3

(Room 201-C)

 

6:15 – 7:00 pm

Plenary Lecture (BCGH Level 2 Banquet Hall)

 

7:00 – 9:00 pm

Welcome Dinner (BCGH Level 2 Banquet Hall)

 

 

 

TUESDAY 26 JUNE 2007

           

8:00 – 1:00 pm

Registration (Foyer, Level 2 outside Room Nos.2B/C, BICC)

 

8:30 – 10:30 pm

Session 2.1 Dynamics of urban and regional development 4 (Room 2B)

 

 

Session 2.2 Neoliberalism and economic governance 1 (Room 2C)

 

 

Session 2.3 Poverty in context: questions, debates, and policy challenges (Room 201-A)

 

 

Session 2.4 Innovation and knowledge dynamics 4

(Room 201-B)

 

 

Session 2.5 Informational economies (Room 201-C)

 

 

Session 2.6 Uneven geographies of global capitalism 1 (Room 307)

 

10:30 – 11:00 am

Tea Break (Foyer, Room Nos.2B/C)

 

11:00 – 1:00 pm

Session 2.7 IGU commission on the dynamics of economic spaces 1 (Room 2B)

 

 

Session 2.8 Neoliberalism and economic governance 2 (Room 2C)

 

 

Session 2.9 (En)gendering economic geography

(Room 201-A)

 

 

Session 2.10 Evolutionary economic geography 1

(Room 201-B)

 

 

Session 2.11 Consumption geographies (Room 201-C)

 

 

Session 2.12 Uneven geographies of global capitalism 2 (Room 307)

 

1:00 – 2:00 pm

Buffet Lunch (BCGH Level 2 Banquet Hall)

 

2:00 – 4:00 pm

Session 2.13 What is economic geography for?

(Hall No.3)

 

 

Session 2.14 IGU commission on the dynamics of economic spaces 2 (Room 2B)

 

 

Session 2.15 RSA session on local and regional development in Asia 1 (Room 2C)

 

 

Session 2.16 Geographies of international trade and investment 1 (Room 201-A)

 

 

Session 2.17 Evolutionary economic geography 2

(Room 201-B)

 

 

Session 2.18 Rural and resource economies 1

(Room 201-C)

 

4:00 – 4:40 pm

Routledge Reception (Foyer, Room Nos.2B/C)

 

4:40 – 6:00 pm

Session 2.19 Panel on Language, international communication and the practice of economic geography (Hall No.3)

 

 

Session 2.20 IGU commission on the dynamics of economic spaces 3 (Room 2B)

 

 

 

 

4:40 – 6:00 pm

Session 2.21 RSA session on local and regional development in Asia 2 (Room 2C)

 

 

Session 2.22 Geographies of international trade and investment 2 (Room 201-A)

 

 

Session 2.23 Evolutionary economic geography 3

(Room 201-B)

 

 

Session 2.24 Rural and resource economies 2

(Room 201-C)

 

6:00 – 7:00 pm

Plenary Lecture (Hall No.3)

 

7:00 – 8:00 pm

Economic Geography Reception (Foyer, Room Nos.2B/C)

 

 

 

WEDNESDAY 27 JUNE 2007 (WHOLEDAY)

 

Pick-up point: Beijing Continental Grand Hotel

 

Time: 8:30 am

 

Fieldtrip 1Beijing Economic and Technological Development Area (BDA)

 

Return to BCGH: 4:30 pm

 

Reception at IGSNRR, CAS: 4:30-6:00 p.m.

 

Fieldtrip 2 Zhongguancun High-Tech Area

 

Return to BCGH: 4:00 pm

 

Reception at IGSNRR, CAS: 4:00-5:30 p.m.

 

 


 


THURSDAY 28 JUNE 2007

 

8:30 – 10:30 pm

Session 4.1 IGU commission on the dynamics of economic spaces 4 (Room 2B)

 

 

Session 4.2 IGU commission on local development 1 (Room 2C)

 

 

Session 4.3 Geographies of international trade and investment 3 (Room 201-A)

 

 

Session 4.4 Clusters and networks 1 (Room 201-B)

 

 

Session 4.5 Rural and resource economies 3

(Room 201-C)

 

10:30 – 11:00 am

Tea Break (Foyer, Room Nos.2B/C)

 

11:00 – 1:00 pm

Session 4.6 IGU commission on the dynamics of economic spaces 5 (Room 2B)

 

 

Session 4.7 IGU commission on local development 2 (Room 2C)

 

 

Session 4.8 Geographies of international trade and investment 4 (Room 201-A)

 

 

Session 4.9 Clusters and networks 2 (Room 201-B)

 

 

Session 4.10 Labour geographies 1 (Room 201-C)

 

1:00 – 2:00 pm

Buffet Lunch (BCGH Level 2 Banquet Hall)

 

2:00 – 4:00 pm

Session 4.11 Reflexive economic geographies and China studies 1: a dialogue (Hall No.3)

 

 

Session 4.12 Geography of service economies 1

(Room 2B)

 

 

Session 4.13 Culture and ethnicity in economic geography 1 (Room 2C)

 

 

Session 4.14 Geographies of international trade and investment 5 (Room 201-A)

 

 

Session 4.15 Clusters and networks 3 (Room 201-B)

 

 

Session 4.16 Labour geographies 2 (Room 201-C)

 

4:00 – 4:40 pm

Tea Break (Foyer, Room Nos.2B/C)

 

4:40 – 6:00 pm

Session 4.17 Reflexive economic geographies and China studies 2: production processes (Hall No.3)

 

 

Session 4.18 Geography of service economies 2

(Room 2B)

 

 

Session 4.19 Culture and ethnicity in economic geography 2 (Room 2C)

 

 

Session 4.20 Geographies of international trade and investment 6 (Room 201-A)

 

 

Session 4.21 Clusters and networks 4 (Room 201-B)

 

 

Session 4.22 Labour geographies 3 (Room 201-C)

 

6:00 – 7:00 pm

Plenary Lecture (Hall No.3)

 

 

End of Conference


DETAILED PROGRAMME

 

MONDAY 25 JUNE 2007

 

8:00 – 8:30 am

Registration

(Foyer, Ground Level next to Hall No.3, Beijing International Convention Center BICC)

 

 

8:30 – 9:00 am

Opening Session (Hall No.3)

Welcome Addresses

Chair: Weidong Liu, Co-Chair, Conference Organizing Committee

 

Professor Jiayang Li

Vice President, Chinese Academy of Sciences

 

Professor Lily Kong

Vice Provost, National University of Singapore

 

Professor Henry Yeung

Co-Chair, Conference Organizing Committee

 

 

9:00 – 10:00 am

Plenary Lecture (Hall No.3)

Chair: Henry Yeung, National University of Singapore

 

People and place in economic geography: learning from women’s entrepreneurship                            

Professor Susan Hanson

Clark University, USA

 

 

10:00 – 10:30 am

Tea Break (Foyer, Room Nos.2B/C)

 

 


10:30 – 12:30 pm

Session 1.1 Global finance 1 (Co-organized by Dariusz Wójcik and Gordon Clark) (Hall No.3)

 

Session 1.2 Dynamics of urban and regional development 1 (Room 2B)

 

Session 1.3 Reflections on social movements, spatiality, and strategy (Co-organized by Jim Glassman and Joel Wainwright) (Room 2C)

Chair: Dariusz Wójcik, University College London, UK

 

Business-to-business barter exchange system as an innovation in money

Melina Young, Independent Researcher

 

Fiber optics and the digital world economy

Barney Warf, Florida State University, USA

 

Functional complementarity of financial centers: the case of Shanghai and Hong Kong

Bas Karreman, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands

 

Government financed health care: a competitive advantage for Canadian manufacturers?

Ashby Monk, University of Oxford, UK

 

How integrated is the internal market? The role of distance in M&A-transactions in Europe

Michael Grote, Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, Germany (with Marc Umber and Rainer Frey)

 

‘Future Bangalores?’ Role of offshoring in the financial centre formation in the major Central Eastern European cities

Zoltán Gál, Hungarian Academy of Sciences

 

Chair: Chung-Tong Wu, University of Western Sydney, Australia

 

A preliminary study on city agglomeration of Gold Triangle in Central China

Yanping Wen, China University of Geosciences (with Chang'an Li)

 

After the three Italies

Michael Dunford, University of Sussex, UK

 

An analysis of disparities in the growth of regional economies in China and its factor decomposition using prefecture level data

Li Li, Chinese Academy of Sciences

 

Building scientific ground for Khanh Hoa coastal zone development strategy

Khac Anh Nguyen, Hanoi National University of Education, Vietnam (with Nguyen Thi Bich Phuong)

 

Economic effects of accelerated urbanization in developing countries: Tehran a case study

Halimeh khatoon Hadipour, University of Tehran, Iran (with Mohamad Taghi Rahnemai)

 

Economic reform process and its impact on urban space and economy: an Indo-Chinese comparison

Tapati Mukhopadhyay, Siddharth College of Arts, Science & Commerce, India

Chair: Joel Wainwright, Ohio State University, USA

 

Failed internationalism and social movement decline: the cases of South Korea and Thailand

Jim Glassman, University of British Columbia, Canada, and Bae-Gyoon Park, Seoul National University, South Korea

 

Pursuing either nationalism or economic democratization: mixed responses of the Korean social movements to globalization

Bae-Gyoon Park, Seoul National University, South Korea (with Young-Jin Choi)

 

Why was rice excluded from the Korea-USA Free Trade Agreement?

Joel Wainwright, Ohio State University, USA

 

Neoliberalism, transnationalism and the Korea-USA Free Trade Agreement

Sookjin Kim, Konkuk University, South Korea, and Joel Wainwright, Ohio State University, USA

 

Offshoring dissent: neoliberal globalization, the state, and spaces of resistance at the 2006 IMF/World Bank meetings

Theresa Wong and Joel Wainwright, Ohio State University, USA

 

The spatialities of contentious politics

Eric Sheppard, University of Minnesota, USA (with Helgar Leitner)

 

 

 

10:30 – 12:30 pm

Session 1.4 Economic-geographical discourses 1 (Room 201-A)

 

Session 1.5 Innovation and knowledge dynamics 1 (Room 201-B)

 

Session 1.6 Economy and the environment 1 (Room 201-C)

Chair: Jinn-Yuh Hsu, National Taiwan University

 

Capitalism beyond harmonious equilibrium: mathematics as if human agency mattered

Luke Bergmann and Eric Sheppard, University of Minnesota, USA (with Paul Plummer)

 

Conceptions of spatial development in Poland

Jerzy Banski, Polish Academy of Sciences

 

Fractal modelling in socio-economic geography

Waldemar Ratajczak, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poland

 

Recent research issues on economic geography in Latin America

Alvaro Sanchez-Crispin, National Autonomous University of Mexico (with Ana Maria Liberali)

 

How the finance-dominated accumulation regime shapes economic geography

Christian Zeller, Institute of Geography, Switzerland

 

Representations of the world system: what metaphors?

Alberto Vanolo Politecnico e UniversitŲ di Torino, Italy

Chair: Jici Wang, Peking University, China

 

Buzz without being there? Communities of practice in context

Meric Gertler, University of Toronto, Canada

 

City-regions, knowledge bases and regional advantages

Heidi Wiig Aslesen, NIFU STEP, Norway (with Knut Onsager, Arne Isaksen, and Ove Langeland)

 

Coordinating regional innovation in the knowledge economy

Jun Zhang, National University of Singapore

 

Developing innovation in a peripheral region: university – industry links in Wales

Tamsin Davies, University of Wales, UK

 

Diversity in knowledge-base and innovation trajectories for regions in the enlarged European Union

Rene Wintjes, United Nations University-MERIT, Netherlands

 

Ecologies of knowledge in global architectural firms

James Faulconbridge, Lancaster University, UK

Chair: Yifei Sun, California State University, USA

 

Agro-economic and environmental influences on grassland quality in Daerhanmaomingan Union Banner in Inner Mongolia: 1980 - 2005

Gregory Veeck, Western Michigan University, USA (with Charles Emerson, Zhou Li, and Fawen Yu)

 

Decomposition analysis of energy consumption growth in China

Wei Zheng, Beijing Normal University, China (with Jinshe Liang and Jianming Cai)

 

Development of economy in Central European countries with relation to environmental stress changes

Martin Balej and Jiri Andel, JE Purkinje University, Czech Republic

 

Drought and its ecological effects in central area of Gilan

Bahman Ramezani, Islamic Azad University, Iran (with Farzad Shirzad)

 

Economic development and environmental conditions in the fragile mountain terrain of Uttaranchal Himalaya, India

Vishwambhar Prasad Sati, Government Post Graduate College, India

 

Economic systems versus environmental issues

Simin Tavallai, Teacher Training University, Iran

 

 

 

12:30 – 1:30 pm

Buffet Lunch (Beijing Continental Grand Hotel BCGH Level 2 Banquet Hall)

 

1:30 – 3:30 pm

Session 1.7 Dynamics of urban and regional development 2 (Room 2B)

 

Session 1.8 Global finance 2 (Co-organized by Dariusz Wójcik and Gordon Clark) (Room 2C)

 

Session 1.9 Economic-geographical discourses 2 (Room 201-A)

Chair: Andrew Marton, University of Nottingham, UK

 

Economic rent and its impact on landuse in South Western Caspian Sea

Ali Alimoradi, Islamic Azad University, Iran

 

Entrepreneurship, innovation and regional development in Sao Paulo

Rogerio dos Santos Acca, Cornell University, USA

 

European integration and its impact on regional policy and regional governance, with special reference to Poland

Roman Szul, University of Warsaw, Poland

 

From competitive regions to competitive city regions

John Harrison, Univerisity of Loughborough, UK

 

Railway network expansion and spatial accessibility evolution in China

Fengjun Jin, Chinese Academy of Sciences (with Jiao’e Wang and Huihui Mo)

 

Geographies of displacement in the creative city: the Case of Liberty Village, Toronto

Deborah Leslie, University of Toronto, Canada

 

Chair: Gordon Clark, University of Oxford, UK

 

Geographical concentration in international finance

Dariusz Wójcik, University College London, UK

 

Islamic banking and the end of the geography of finance (as we knew it)

Michael Samers, University of Kentucky, USA

 

Market growth and network dynamics in financial markets: comparison between Europe and Asia

Bongman Seo, Hitotsubashi University, Japan

 

One country, two banking systems? Contesting visions of ‘markets’ in Shanghai

Karen Lai, University of Nottingham, UK

 

Private finance/public service: the economic geography of PFI

Steven Musson, University of Reading, UK

 

Infrastructure financing and operation in the contemporary urban economy

Phillip O'Neill, University of Western Sydney, Australia

Chair: Yuko Aoyama, Clark University, USA

 

Staged catching-up theory and its spatial manifestation: development of domestic ICT firms in China

Peilei Fan, Michigan State University, USA

 

The scientific connotation and space organization mechanisms of the Compact City

Xiuwei Li, Chinese Academy of Sciences

 

Theorising face-to-face interaction in the global corporation – towards a conceptual framework

Andrew Jones, University of London, UK

 

The role of higher education in centralization of Tehran

Mahamad Taghi Rahnemai, University of Tehran, Iran

 

Integration of geographic modelling with Space Syntax

Chung Weon Oh, Namseoul University, South Korea

 

Ecocentric geophilosopy of sustainable economy

Nathuram Kaswan, Govt. College, India

 

 


 

1:30 – 3:30 pm

Session 1.10 Innovation and knowledge dynamics 2 (Room 201-B)

 

Session 1.11 Economy and the environment 2 (Room 201-C)

Chair: James Faulconbridge, Lancaster University, UK

 

Does size matter? Local conditions for innovative activities in large and medium-sized Dutch cities

Merijn van der Werff, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands

 

Economic geography of Finnish research and development

Tommi Inkinen, University of Helsinki, Finland

 

Technology upgrade of less developed countries in GVC: evidence from China

Ye Zhang, Peking University, China (with Yang Yao)

 

Collaborative networks in product development: Case study of software companies in Oulu

Katariina Ala-Rämi, University of Oulu, Finland

 

Transnationalism and technology transfer

Jinn-Yuh Hsu, National Taiwan University

 

Writing knowledge across borders: patent attorneys and the authorization of intellectual property in Japan

Tim Reiffenstein, Mount Allison University, Canada

 

Chair: Gregory Veeck, Western Michigan University, USA

 

Food security in Bangladesh: present state and challenges ahead

Md. Shamsul Alam, University of Rajshahi, Bangladesh

 

Forecasting insured hurricane losses

James Elsner, Florida State University, USA (with Thomas Jagger)

 

Global standards and local responses: survey on green manufacturing in electronics industry in Shenzhen-Dongguan, China

Xin Tong, Peking University, China

 

Institution, power and actor: understanding environmental challenges of foreign R&D operations in China

Yifei Sun, California State University, USA

 

Khanh Hoa capture labour and poverty

Thi Hong Nhung To, Hanoi National University of Education, Vietnam

 

Markets in environmental services: the missing link between conservation and development?

Kathleen McAfee, San Francisco State University, USA

 

3:30 – 4:00 pm

Tea Break (Foyer, Room Nos.2B/C)


 

4:00 – 6:00 pm

Session 1.12 Dynamics of urban and regional development 3 (Room 2B)

 

Session 1.13 Global finance 3 (Co-organized by Dariusz Wójcik and Gordon Clark) (Room 2C)

 

Session 1.14 Alternative economic geographies (Organized by Katherine Gibson) (Room 201-A)

Chair: Canfei He, Peking University, China

 

The forgotten ‘West’ in China’s regional development?

Enru Wang, University of North Dakota, USA

 

Metropolitan economic growth and spatial dependence: evidence from a panel of China

Pei Li, Renmin University of China

 

New urban formation in China’s lower Yangzi Delta: functional specialisation and administrative restructuring in Kunshan

Andrew Marton, University of Nottingham, UK

 

On the cross-border urban system development and planning in China

Tao Lin, Shanghai Normal University, China

 

Principles for strategic spatial planning and development: a critique of the Irish experience

Michael Murray, Queen’s University Belfast, UK

 

The role of location in the marketing strategy of nonprofit performing arts organizations

Christine Lai, Daemen College, USA, and Jessie Poon, State University of New York, USA

 

Chair: Karen Lai, University of Nottingham, UK

 

Regional differences of Project Finance in Korea

Won Seok Park, Daegu University, South Korea

 

The dynamic of the financial industry: a territorial approach through Swiss pension funds

Thierry Theurillat University of NeuchČtel, Switzerland (with José Corpataux and Olivier Crevoisier)

 

The future of central business districts: a comparative study of Beijing and Singapore

Tai-Chee Wong, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

 

The global job mobility networks of Asian financial firms

David Meyer, Brown University, USA

 

The local financial systems in China mainland

Wei Wu, Chinese Academy of Sciences (with Liu, Weidong)

 

What do we know about international capital movements?

Philip Sarre, Open University, UK

Chair: Roger Lee, University of London, UK

 

Breaking the brand: geographies of corporate responsibility and political possibility

Trina Hamilton, State University of New York, USA

 

Diversity economy and flexible management on land use of Lahu minority in Jinghong, southwest of China

Lihui Chen, Yunnan University, China, and Katherine Gibson, Australian National University

 

Geography, finance and trust: the Bank of China’s IPO, Hong Kong 2006

Yajing Li and Roger Lee, University of London, UK

 

Mothers in a diverse economy: development agencies and mothers’ economic activities in Qinghai

Kelly Dombroski, Australian National University

 

The ‘moral economy’ meets ‘diverse economies’: rethinking rural transformation and local development in the Philippines

Katherine Gibson, Australian National University

 

The geography of Islamic banking and finance

Mona Atia, University of Washington, USA

 


 

4:00 – 6:00 pm

Session 1.15 Innovation and knowledge dynamics 3 (Room 201-B)

 

Session 1.16 Economy and the environment 3 (Room 201-C)

Chair: Yu Zhou, Vassar College, USA

 

Knowledge based economy and post-communist transformation

Pavel Ptacek, Palacky University Olomouc, Czech Republic

 

Learning by subcontracting: experience and lessons from Chinese Bicycle industrial clusters

Lixia Mei, Peking University, China

 

Local innovative dynamics and the global fashion city phenomenon: Montréal’s missing link

Norma Rantisi, Concordia University, Canada

 

Promotion of high technology in Chinese high-tech parks: an empirical analysis in Shanghai Pudong

Tao Wang, Nanjing Normal University, China (with Gang Zeng and Ingo Liefner)

 

Spaces of learning: proximities and knowledge flows

Mia Gray, Cambridge University, UK (with Brendan Burchell)

 

State policies, enterprise dynamism, and innovation system in Shanghai, China

Weiping Wu, Virginia Commonwealth University, USA

 

Chair: Xin Tong, Peking University, China

 

Scientific basis for rational utilization and protection of karst areas in Vietnam

Quang Hai Truong, Vietnam National University

 

Sustainable development trajectories: how stories from Asia shape environmental management in Aotearoa New Zealand

Alison Greenaway, Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research, New Zealand

 

The influence of international trade on the land use structure: the case study of the Amur River basin

Natalya Mishina, Russian Academy of Sciences

 

Ecological footprint method in sustainability of metropolitans with considering Tehran as a metropolitan

Farzaneh Sasanpour, Independent Scholar, Iran

 

Problems of sustainable development of Northeast China and the Russian Far East transboundary territories

Sergey Ganzey, Russian Academy of Sciences

 

Renewable energies and regional development: A research topic for economic geographers?

Christian Schulz and Urs Maier, University of Luxembourg

 

 


 

6:15 – 7:00 pm

Plenary Lecture (BCGH Level 2 Banquet Hall)

Chair: Weidong Liu, Chinese Academy of Sciences

 

Economic geography in China

Professor Dadao Lu

Chinese Academy of Sciences

 

7:00 – 9:00 pm

Welcome Dinner (BCGH Level 2 Banquet Hall)

 

 

 

 

TUESDAY 26 JUNE 2007


 

8:30 – 10:30 am

Session 2.1 Dynamics of urban and regional development 4 (Room 2B)

 

Session 2.2 Neoliberalism and economic governance 1 (Room 2C)

 

Session 2.3 Poverty in context: questions, debates, and policy challenges (Co-organized by Guo Chen and Amy Glasmeier) (Room 201-A)

Chair: George Lin, University of Hong Kong

 

Regional development agencies: new institutional factor influencing the dynamics of regional development in Slovenia

Simon Kusar, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia

 

Research on the global urban competitiveness

Pengfei Ni, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, China

 

Shrinking cities in the new urban economy

Cristina Martinez-Fernandez and Chung-Tong Wu, University of Western Sydney, Australia

 

Swedish cities in ‘the space of flows’: national, European and global networks

Brita Hermelin, Stockholm University, Sweden

 

Territorial structures of economy in management by sustainable development of the region

Peter Baklanov, Russian Academy of Sciences

 

Regional dynamics in Tunisia

Adnane Hayder, Université de Tunisia

Chair: Trevor Barnes, University of British Columbia, Canada

 

Situating neoliberalism: geographies of a contested concept

Wendy Larner, Bristol University, UK

 

‘Actually existing’ Olympism: Beijing’s 2008 games and China’s neoliberal project

Christopher Smith and Katie Himmelfarb, State University of New York, USA

 

Contrived laissez-faireism in Hong Kong under the British Colonial rule

Fujio Mizuoka, Hitotsubashi University, Japan

 

Development is dead

Susan Roberts, University of Kentucky, USA

 

Macroeconomics, regional development and regional innovation: a framework for integration

James Juniper, University of Newcastle, Australia

 

Making European space: EU projects, governmental visuality and intellectual irony

Sami Moisio, University of Turku, Finland

 

 

Chair: Amy Glasmeier, Pennsylvania State University, USA

 

State, market, and those in-between: the changing geography of poverty in urban China

Guo Chen, Pennsylvania State University, USA

 

An analysis of poverty alleviation in fishing communities in Van Don district, Quang Ninh province, Vietnam

Thi Minh Duc Do, Hanoi National University of Education, Vietnam

 

Geographies of homelessness policy in the US

Christine Jocoy, California State University, USA

 

New urban poverty in Chinese transitional economies

Chaolin Gu, Tsinghua University, China (with Fulong Wu and Guo Chen)

 

Poverty in coastal communities of Khanh Hoa province

Thi Hong Nhung Tran, Hanoi National University of Education, Vietnam

 

The creative class meets the poor: segregated spaces or urban geographies of inclusion?

Amy Glasmeier, Pennsylvania State University, USA

 


 

8:30 – 10:30 am

Session 2.4 Innovation and knowledge dynamics 4 (Room 201-B)

 

Session 2.5 Informational economies (Room 201-C)

 

Session 2.6 Uneven geographies of global capitalism 1 (Room 307)

Chair: Mia Gray, Cambridge University, UK

 

Tacit knowledge and quality of work in voice-interactive services: a case study of call centers in India

Chandrani Ohdedar, Pennsylvania State University, USA

 

Theory of innovation - a multi-level gaze from non-metropolitan Norway

Arnt FlŅysand, University of Bergen, Norway, and Stig-Erik Jakobsen, Institute for Research in Economics and Business Administration, Norway

 

The spatiality of information acquisition and knowledge sharing in rapidly growing firms

Eirik Vatne, Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration

 

The strategy for innovative cluster in Changwon industrial complex, South Korea

Sang-Chul Park, Korea Polytechnic University, and Sang-Chun Lee, Changwon Cluster Development Agency

 

User-led innovation and Japanese culture industries

Jakob Nobuoka, Uppsala University, Sweden

 

User-led innovation, knowledge and economic geography

Dominic Power, Uppsala University, Sweden (with Yuko Aoyama)

Chair: Martin Hess, University of Manchester, UK

 

A comparative study about the agglomerations of the Japanese animation and home video game industries

Seiji Hanzawa, University of Tokyo, Japan

 

A model for global economic practices at the regional and urban scale

Mark Wilson and Kenneth Corey, Michigan State University, USA

 

Manufacturing solutions: explaining e-commerce adoption in U.S. manufacturing firms

Matthew Zook, University of Kentucky, USA (With Tom Leinbach and Candice Wallace)

 

Constructing ‘e-governance’ in urban China: strategies and practices

Wen Lin, University of Wisconsin, USA (with Rina Ghose)

 

New information and communication technologies in local clusters of small and medium-sized enterprises

Zhouying Song, Chinese Academy of Sciences (with Weidong Liu and Yi Liu)

 

Revisiting the geography of the new economy

William Beyers, University of Washington, USA

Chair: Philip Kelly, York University, Canada

 

Variegated capitalism

Jamie Peck, University of Wisconsin, USA and Nik Theodore, University of Illinois, USA

 

The spaces of primitive accumulation in rural China

Michael Webber, University of Melbourne, Australia

 

‘NGOzation’ of the third world: a study of donors, NGOs, and the poor

Charlene Chi, Ohio State University, USA

                                                           

Deservedness, development, and the state in USAID’s foreign assistance framework

Jamey Essex, University of Windsor, Canada

 

Globalization and the Mezzorgiorno: a fourth Italy?

Michael Shin, University of California, USA

 

Measuring the sources of agglomeration economies: micro-data panel estimates from Canadian manufacturing

David Rigby, University of California, USA (with John Baldwin and W. Mark Brown)

 

 

 

10:30 – 11:00 am

Tea Break (Foyer, Room Nos.2B/C)

 


 

11:00 am – 1:00 pm

Session 2.7 IGU commission on the dynamics of economic spaces 1 (Room 2B)

 

Session 2.8 Neoliberalism and economic governance 2 (Room 2C)

 

Session 2.9 (En)gendering economic geography (Room 201-A)

Chair: Robert Hassink, University of Oslo, Norway

 

Dynamics of socio-economic spaces in the aging society

Sam-Ock Park, Seoul National University, South Korea

 

Industrial clusters in China: territorial innovation systems or supply-chain cities of the world economy?

Jici Wang, Peking University, China

 

Social network analysis in cluster-based economic development

Michael C. Carroll, Bowling Green State University, USA (with Bruce W. Smith and Neil Reid)

 

U.S. floriculture: an industry under threat

Bruce W. Smith, Bowling Green State University, USA (with Neil Reid, Michael Carroll, and Peter Lindquist)

 

Against the new economy? Growth of the chemical industry in the larger Shanghai and Yangtze delta region

Gang Zeng, East China Normal University (with Harald Bathelt)

 

An industrial district of furniture manufacturing in Japan and its strategy for survival under the global competition

Kenji Yamamoto, Kyushu University, Japan

 

Chair: Wendy Larner, Bristol University, UK

 

Market b/orders: Performing transnational production-consumption-networks

Christian Berndt, University of Frankfurt, Germany

 

Neo-liberalising corporate social responsibility

David Sadler, University of Liverpool, UK (with Stuart Lloyd)

 

New-liberalism and sustainability? An institutional approach

Rob Krueger, WPI, USA (with David Gibbs)

 

The birth of a discipline? The creative industries and the intersection of policy and economic knowledge

Russell Prince, Bristol University, UK

 

Neo-liberalism and its limits: a comparison of three forest economies

Trevor Barnes, University of British Columbia, Canada (with Roger Hayter)

 

Relaunching regional economic development planning for Auckland

Steffen Wetzstein, University of Auckland, New Zealand

Chair: Yuko Aoyama, Clark University, USA

 

‘Selective Westernisation’: an example from Assam

Rituparna Bhattacharyya, University of Newcastle, UK

 

Feminist geopolitics: the US Air Force Academy, democracy, wealth, and power

Terrence Haverluk, US Air Force Academy

 

Neoliberal economic restructuring and representations of the Black welfare queen

Rebecca Burnett, University of Washington, USA

 

The different roles and status of women in fishing families in Khanh Hoa, Vietnam

Minh Ngoc Nguyen, Hanoi National University of Education, Vietnam

 

The tobacco female workers of Mexico City and the modernization of the cigarette industry from XVIII to XXth century

Ana Saloma, Escuela Nacional de Antropología Historia, Mexico

 

Women and workfare resistance

Julie MacLeavy, Bristol University, UK

 


 

11:00 am – 1:00 pm

Session 2.10 Evolutionary economic geography 1 (Organized by Ron Boschma and Ron Martin) (Room 201-B)

 

Session 2.11 Consumption geographies (Room 201-C)

11:00 am – 12:20 pm

Session 2.12 Uneven geographies of global capitalism 2 (Room 307)

Chair: Helen Lawton Smith, University of London, UK

 

Learning from the Bangalore experience: the role of universities in an emerging regional innovation system

Cristina Chaminade, Jan Vang and Lars Coenen, Lund University, Sweden

 

Related variety and regional development

Ron Boschma, Utrecht University, Netherlands

 

Co-evolution of firms, industries, networks and clustering: a perspective from evolutionary economic geography

Anne ter Wal and Ron Boschma, Utrecht University, Netherlands

 

Creating a place for economic transition: how laggards become leaders

Susan Walcott, University of North Carolina, USA

 

Evolutionary game theory perspectives on regional seaports: international experiences and case studies of China

Shuguang Liu, Ocean University of China

 

The state space interaction in Finland – towards a Nordic competition state?

Laura Leppänen, University of Turku, Finland

 

Chair: Tim Bunnell, National University of Singapore

 

Chicken and egg supply under the outbreak of avian influenza in Japan, 2004

Hitoshi Araki, Yamaguchi University, Japan

 

Consumption spaces and the politics of placemaking: managing change on two Toronto commercial strips

James Martin Delaney, University of Toronto, Canada

 

Emergence and management of high-tech parks: experiences from Hyderabad, India

C. Ramachandraiah, University of Hyderabad, India

 

Food supply system on emerging quality salt in Japan

Katsuki Umeda, Hokkaido University, Japan

 

Regulatory reform, retail internationalization, and Chinese consumption in transition

Lucia Lo, York University, Canada, and Lu Wang, Ryerson University, Canada

 

The (re-)production of apartment kitchens in Taipei

Peter Cheng-Chong Wu, National Taiwan Normal University

Chair: Michael Webber, University of Melbourne, Australia

 

Regional dimension of socioeconomic inequality in the Czech Republic

Josef Novotny and Vojtech Nosek, Charles University, Czech Republic

 

Regional income disparities in the post-restructuring period: evidence from Japan, 1972-2004

Daisaku Yamamoto, Central Michigan University, USA

 

The limits of copying successful institutional settings – the (failed) French case of emulating the U.S. biotechnology regime

Bernhard Fuhrer, University of Berne, Switzerland

 

A study on the resource based tourism cluster: the case of Wuyishan

Honggang Xu, Sun Yat-sen University, China (with Liwei Wang)

 

 

1:00 – 2:00 pm

Buffet Lunch (BCGH Level 2 Banquet Hall)

 


 

2:00 – 4:00 pm

Session 2.13 What is economic geography for? (Organized by Jamie Peck) (Hall No.3)

 

Session 2.14 IGU commission on the dynamics of economic spaces 2 (Room 2B)

 

Session 2.15 RSA session on local and regional development in Asia 1 (Organized by Henry Yeung) (Room 2C)

Chair: Peter Dicken, University of Manchester, UK

 

Panelists:

Introduction

Jamie Peck, University of Wisconsin, USA

 

The importance of ‘trailing ands’: economic geography as engaged pluralism

Trevor Barnes, University of British Columbia, Canada, and Eric Sheppard, University of Minnesota, USA

 

Economic geography: creating diverse futures

Katherine Gibson, Australian National University

 

Evolution in economic geography

Ron Boschma, Utrecht University, Netherlands

 

Import-oriented growth? Development of economic geography in Japan

Yoshihiro Miyamachi, Oita University, Japan

 

 

Chair: Sam-Ock Park, Seoul National University, South Korea

 

The emergence of computer and video game clusters: Seoul and Hamburg in comparison

Robert Hassink, University of Oslo, Norway

 

Creative industries, spatiality and flexibility—the example of film production

Margareta Dahlström, Nordic Centre for Spatial Development, Sweden (with Brita Hermelin)

 

Factors affecting recent spatial changes of the electrical household appliance industry in China

Boyang Gao, Chinese Academy of Sciences (with Weidong Liu)

 

Geography of the Polish transition

Tadeusz Stryjakiewicz, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poland

 

Globalization and the property development industry

Andrew Wood, University of Kentucky, USA

 

Hybrid space, technology, and development discourse in the Thai silk industry

Mark Graham, University of Kentucky, USA

 

Chair: Markus Hassler, Philipps-University Marburg, Germany

 

Scaling up regional development in globalizing China

George Lin, University of Hong Kong

                        

From OEM to own brand-name: the organizational governance and territorial extension/embeddedness of Taiwanese PC production-distribution networks in China

You-Ren Yang and Jinn-Yuh Hsu, National Taiwan University

 

Cross-border production networks in the greater China: a comparative study of Taiwan PC clusters in Dongguan and Suzhou

Chun Yang, University of Hong Kong

 

Understanding the changing geography of China’s state-owned enterprises: a ‘new regionalism’ perspective

Zhiyong Hu, Chinese Academy of Sciences

 

Balanced development in globalizing regional development: unpacking the new regional policy in South Korea

Yong-Sook Lee, National University of Singapore

 

Foreign multinationals and agglomeration economies in Thailand

Jessie Poon, State University of New York, USA (with Suksawat Sajarattanachote)

 


 

2:00 – 4:00 pm

Session 2.16 Geographies of international trade and investment 1 (Room 201-A)

 

Session 2.17 Evolutionary economic geography 2 (Organized by Ron Boschma and Ron Martin) (Room 201-B)

 

Session 2.18 Rural and resource economies 1 (Room 201-C)

Chair: Godfrey Yeung, University of Sussex, UK

 

An assessment of the failure to internationalize: a comparison of Greece with the late transition economies

Athanassios Kalogeressis and Lois Labrianidis, University of Macedonia, Greece

 

Living next to the transition: the role of cultural and geographical proximity in flows of FDI, migration and trade between transition and developed economies

Lois Labrianidis and Athanassios Kalogeressis, University of Macedonia, Greece

 

New patterns of food trade in Asia Pacific: the role of China

Niels Fold, University of Copenhagen, Denmark (with Lasse Moller-Jensen)

 

Changing role of research and development in the foreign direct investments in Central Eastern Europe

György Kukely, Hungarian Academy of Sciences

 

Indo-Myanmar trade through northeast India

Sukanya Sharma, Indian Institute of Technology

 

Internationalization and localization of Korean SMEs in Silicon Valley

Yeonmi Seo, Seoul National University, South Korea

Chair: Jan Vang, Lund University, Sweden

 

Exports and plant productivity in southern California: analysis using the Longitudinal Research Database, 1987-1997

Sebastien Breau, McGill University, Canada, and David Rigby, University of California, USA

 

Self-renewal capacity and economic growth

Toni Saarivirta, University of Tampere, Finland

 

Local innovation policy from an evolutionary perspective: is self-renewal capacity a key?

Markku Sotarauta, University of Tampere, Finland

 

R&D activities in foreign-owned firms in the UK: strategy, power and globalisation

Helen Lawton Smith, University of London, UK

 

Regional technology evolution in Japanese manufacturing

Jurgen Essletzbichler, University College London, UK (with Kazuo Kadokawa)

 

Self-renewal capacity of evolving industrial clusters in the less favoured Finnish regions

Kati-Jasmin Kosonen, University of Tampere, Finland

 

 

Chair: Markku Tykkyläinen, University of Joensuu, Finland

 

The cultural labelling of natural tourist areas

Jean Corneloup, Université Joseph Fourier, France (with Pascal Mao and Oliver Obin)

 

The French research about economic and territory impact of outdoor recreation

Pascal Mao, Université Joseph Fourier, France (with Marc Langenbach, Jean Corneloup, and Oliver Obin)

 

Types and changes of village-level economy since the 1990s: a case of Gongyi city in Henan Province

Jiajun Qiao and Xiaojian Li, Henan University, China

 

What geography plays in determining rural household income? A township level study in Henan province, China

Xiaojian Li, Henan University, China (with Jiajun Qiao, Genghe Gao, Yunfeng Kong)

 

Destruction of natural sources and sustainable rural development

Mostafa Taleshi, Payam Nour University, Iran

 

East European capitalism? Property rights and stakeholder privatization in rural Russia

Peter Lindner, University of Frankfurt, Germany

 

 

 

4:00 – 4:40 pm

Routledge Reception (Foyer, Room Nos.2B/C)

 


 

4:40 – 6:00 pm

Session 2.19 Panel on Language, international communication and the practice of economic geography (Organized by Tim Reiffenstein) (Hall No.3)

 

Session 2.20 IGU commission on the dynamics of economic spaces 3 (Room 2B)

 

Session 2.21 RSA session on local and regional development in Asia 2 (Organized by Henry Yeung) (Room 2C)

Chair: Tim Reiffenstein, Mount Allison University, Canada

 

Panelists:

Harald Bathelt, University of Toronto, Canada

 

Karen Lai, University of Nottingham, UK

 

Fujio Mizuoka, Hitotsubashi University, Japan

 

Michael Samers, University of Kentucky, USA

 

Sarah Turner, McGill University, Canada

Chair: George Lin, University of Hong Kong

 

Cluster development in China: a perspective of industry relocation

Pengfei Li, Peking University, China

 

Internet and local development: from the ‘last’ to the ‘first’ kilometre

Christian Longhi, CNRS, France

 

Junctions towards more competencies in subsidiaries of international companies

Martina Fuchs, University of Cologne, Germany

 

Dublin’s digital hubris: lessons from an attempt to develop a creative digital cluster

Darrin Bayliss, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

 

 

Chair: Yong-Sook Lee, National University of Singapore

 

Firms as exceptions: creativity and the cultural politics of firm location in Malaysia’s Multimedia Super Corridor

Joshua Lepawsky, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada

 

Global reproduction networks in a Philippine growth zone

Philip Kelly, York University, Canada

 

Context-sensitive explanations of creation and appropriation of value: lessons from Vietnam

Hege Knutsen, University of Oslo

 

Changing production networks in Thailand: AFTA and its impact on regional development

Markus Hassler, Philipps-University Marburg, Germany

 

 


 

4:40 – 6:00 pm

Session 2.22 Geographies of international trade and investment 2 (Room 201-A)

 

Session 2.23 Evolutionary economic geography 3 (Organized by Ron Boschma and Ron Martin) (Room 201-B)

 

Session 2.24 Rural and resource economies 2 (Room 201-C)

Chair: James Murphy, Clark University, USA

 

Japanese foreign direct investment in manufacturing sector in Malaysia: a case study of Penang (1991-2000)

Swee Ean Tan, University Science of Malaysia

 

Learning to compete: communities of investment promotion practice in the spread of global neoliberalism

Nicholas Phelps, University College London, UK (with M. Power and R. Wanjiru)

 

Local players and markets in a global real estate economy: the case of Mexico City and Sčo Paulo

André Scharmanski, University of Cologne, Germany

 

Location of foreign R&D: evidences from Shanghai, China

Debin Du, East China Normal University

Chair: Jun Zhang, National University of Singapore

 

What determines the efficiency of regional innovation systems?

Michael Fritsch, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Germany (with Viktor Slavtchev)

 

Why New York arrived fashionably late: path-dependency in the spatial evolution of the fashion design industry, 1858-2005

Rik Wenting, Utrecht University, Netherlands

 

Differentiated knowledge bases, distributed knowledge networks and the role of sectoral and regional innovation systems: the case of biotechnology

Lars Coenen and Annika Rickne, Lund University, Sweden (with Björn Asheim and Jerker Moodysson)

 

Firms in knowledge producing projects: personal and system trust in the mechatronic industry in the SŅnderborg region, Denmark

Christine Benna Skytt and Lars Winther, University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Chair: Jinn-Yuh Hsu, National Taiwan University

 

Geo-economic transformation of the Russian North

Markku Tykkyläinen, University of Joensuu, Finland

 

Territory and heritage: the co-construction of one dynamic and its resources

Maud Hirczak and Nicolas Senil, Institut de Géographie Alpine, France

 

The economic assessment of rural energy programmes based on renewable energy of Maharashtra (state) Energy Development Agency (MEDA)

Arun Annasaheb Patil, Mahavir Mahavidyalaya, India

 

‘Small is powerful’: foreign companies in China’s on-shore oil industry

Baoling Wang, University of British Columbia, Canada

 

 

6:00 – 7:00 pm

Plenary Lecture (Hall No.3)

Chair: Weidong Liu, Chinese Academy of Sciences

 

Governing finance

Professor Gordon Clark

Oxford University, UK

 

7:00 – 8:00 pm

Economic Geography Reception (Foyer, Room Nos.2B/C)


 

 

THURSDAY 28 JUNE 2007

 

8:30 – 10:30 am

Session 4.1 IGU commission on the dynamics of economic spaces 4 (Room 2B)

 

Session 4.2 IGU commission on local development 1 (Room 2C)

 

Session 4.3 Geographies of international trade and investment 3 (Room 201-A)

Chair: Michael Taylor, University of Birmingham, UK

 

Organizational restructuring and spatial dynamics of the manufacturing industries in Japan

Hiroshi Matsubara, University of Tokyo, Japan

 

Revitalizing the old industrial base of northeast China: the process, policy and challenge

Pingyu Zhang, Chinese Academy of Sciences

 

The dynamics of organizing an industrial cluster in the periphery

Shuang Yann Wong, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

 

Changing rules, permanent business: the institutional environment for business activity in a transforming economy (the case of Poland)

Krzysztof Stachowiak, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poland

 

The international division of talent in the motion picture industry

Naomi Pope, University of Victoria, Canada

 

The interplay between cyber space and urban space

Kee-Bom Nahm, University of Seoul, South Korea

Chair: Michael Sofer, Bar-Ilan University, Israel

 

2005 Famine in Northern Bangladesh: an ecological analysis

Shajaat Ali Abu Muhammad, University of Texas, USA

 

A storm in a coffee cup: coffee open market and the local livelihoods in India

Shrinidhi Ambinakudige, Mississippi State University, USA

 

Actualising community development

Emma Allen, University of Newcastle, Australia

 

The breeding ground of cultural and creative Industry in China - a case study of Alley Nan-Luo-Gu in Beijing

Chun Zhang, Ching-Ning Wang, Ping Chen, and Ji-Ci Wang, Peking University, China

 

Barriers to local development in localities that are experiencing urbanization processes: a case study of Arab localities in Israel

Rassem Khamaisi, University of Haifa, Israel

 

Development of infrastructural facilities in India: a case for Madhya Pradesh state

I.K. Mansoori, Jiwaji University, India

 

 

Chair: Nicholas Phelps, University College London, UK

 

Locational and strategic determinants of Chinese FDI in the United States

Chris Johnston, State University of New York, USA

 

Organisational challenges and strategic responses of retail TNCs in China

Wance Tacconelli, University of Southampton, UK

 

Process R&D in the Irish pharmaceutical industry: the changing role of multinational subsidiaries in global networks

Chris van Egeraat, National University of Ireland

 

Reconceptualizing interdependencies of industrial globalization and regional development – the ‘industrial transition’ approach

Martina Fromhold-Eisebith, RWTH Aachen University, Germany

 

Regional competition and parallel imports in passenger vehicles: a preliminary investigation

Godfrey Yeung, University of Sussex, UK

 

The spatial diffusion of foreign catering chain stores in Beijing city: a case study of Kentucky Fried Chicken

Yi-ou Zuo, Beijing Normal University, China

 


 

8:30 – 10:30 am

Session 4.4 Clusters and networks 1 (Room 201-B)

 

Session 4.5 Rural and resource economies 3 (Room 201-C)

Chair: Jici Wang, Peking University, China

 

‘Clusters’, hubs’, ‘hotspots’ and ‘networks’: a case of fashionable discourse or a new geography of global knowledge production for higher education?

Susan Robertson, University of Bristol, UK (with Kris Olds)

 

Temporary face-to-face contact and the ecology of global buzz

Nina Schuldt, University of Marburg, Germany, and Harald Bathelt, University of Toronto, Canada

 

A loosely-articulated cluster: the case of the Korean motion picture industry

Sungjae Choo, Kyunghee University, South Korea

 

Beyond Marshallian industrial district: the trans-scalar spatial-organizational formation of TFT-LCD cluster in Taiwan

I-Jhy Su, Tainan National University of the Arts (with You-Ren Yang)

 

Cluster in agrarian value chains in Germany and Poland

Peter Dannenberg, Humboldt University, Germany

 

Creating an creative milieu – the case of Berlin-Adlershof

Elmar Kulke, Humboldt University, Germany

 

Chair: Baoling Wang, University of British Columbia, Canada

 

The new rice economy in Taiwan: towards a cross-border rice?

Wen-Cheng Wang, National Taiwan Normal University

 

Review and research perspective of land acquisition in China
Hongmei Yang, Chinese Academy of Sciences

 

The impact of Jajrood's climate upon the occurrence of landslide and its subsequent lands devaluation in neighboring communities

Zahra Beigom Hedjazizadeh, Teacher Training University, Iran

 

Rural migrant workers in China’s transitional cities

Li Zhang, Chinese University of Hong Kong

 

Land use rights, the informal economy, and labor policy change in China (1980-4)

Yiu Por Chen, DePaul University, USA

 

Industrial transformation and employment change of old industrial city: the case of Shenyang, China

Lijing Dong, Northeast Normal University, China (with Pingyu Zhang)

 

 


10:30 – 11:00 am

Tea Break (Foyer, Room Nos.2B/C)


 

11:00 am – 1:00 pm

Session 4.6 IGU commission on the dynamics of economic spaces 5 (Room 2B)

 

Session 4.7 IGU commission on local development 2 (Room 2C)

 

Session 4.8 Geographies of international trade and investment 4 (Room 201-A)

Chair: Jessie Poon, State University of New York, USA

 

The patent distributing in technology standard and value chain governance type – the case of global mobile communication industry

Hu Wen, Hunan University, China (with You-ren Yang)

 

Competing by design, specialisation and customization: manufacturing locks in the West Midlands (UK)

Michael Taylor, University of Birmingham, UK (with John Bryson and Richard Cooper)

 

Population aging and industries for the elderly in Korea

Yangmi Koo, Seoul National University, South Korea (with Sam Ock Park)

 

Agrarian nature management: sustainable development of unstable system

Krasnoyarova Bella, Russian Academy of Sciences

 

Building atmospheric liquidity: the opportunities and challenges of developing an interconnected emissions trading market

Janelle Knox, Oxford University, UK

 

Rebuilding China: land, power and territoriality

You-tien Hsing, University of California, USA

 

Chair: Jun Zhang, National University of Singapore

 

The metropolitan region of Sčo Paulo: industrial restructuring and new functions

Clélio Campolina Diniz, CEDEPLAR - Centro de Desenvolvimento e Planejamento Regional, Brazil (with Bernardo Campolina)

 

Economic reforms in Tanzania: regional development and livelihood insecurity of refugees

Opportuna Kweka, University of Minnesota, USA

 

Research on the human resource development of the Three Gorges region

Yinzhen Zhou, China Three Gorges University

 

Unequal local development in the Israeli rural space

Michael Sofer, Bar-Ilan University, Israel (with Levia Applebaum)

 

Value chain struggles: compliance and defiance in the plantation districts of South India

Bill Pritchard, University of Sydney, Australia (with Jeffery Neilson)

 

Rural development and relational spaces: a case of the tea industry in Longtan

Hung-Jen Tan, National Taiwan Normal University

Chair: Claes G. Alvstam, Goteborg University, Sweden

 

South-south trade and investment relations: new geographies of production, innovation, and consumption?

James Murphy, Clark University, USA

 

Spaces of power: foreign direct investment in India

Waquar Ahmed, Clark University, USA

 

Spatial dimensions of foreign direct investment in export services: evidence from Ireland

Proinnsias Breathnach, National University of Ireland

 

Strategic responses of Canadian and US exporters to increased US border security measures

Anneliese Vance, State University of New York, USA

 

Synchronizing export and import substitution: path of China’s high-tech industry

Yu Zhou, Vassar College, USA

 

Taiwan's latecomer firms and the Asian division of labour

David Edgington, University of British Columbia, Canada (with Lydia Lee and Roger Hayter)

 

 

 


 

11:00 am – 1:00 pm

Session 4.9 Clusters and networks 2 (Room 201-B)

 

Session 4.10 Labour geographies 1 (Room 201-C)

Chair: Jennifer Johns, University of Liverpool, UK

 

Firm networks and Korean subsidiaries in the United States

Douglas Gress, Ewha Womans University, South Korea

 

Franchises in Asia: relations of replication

Mary McDonald, University of Hawaii, USA

 

Global production network, the role of the Chinese state and Guangzhou automotive industry cluster

He Wang, Syracuse University, USA

 

Industrial cluster: the new development-patterns of the traditional farming regions under globalization

Er-ling Li, Henan University, China (with Xiaojian Li)

 

Institutional re-scaling, voice and innovation in clusters

Tod Rutherford, Syracuse University, USA

 

Review on regional industrial upgrading and a framework of upgrading dimensions

Tao Lin and Jici Wang, Peking University, China

Chair: Philip Kelly, York University, Canada

 

Temporary staffing agencies and the changing nature of the Japanese labour market

Neil Coe, University of Manchester, UK

 

International outsourcing and new forms of eWork: an economic boom for Africa?

Chris Benner, Pennsylvania State University, USA

 

Job mobility and local economic development

Daniel Felsenstein, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

 

Labor transition in Chinese urban services sector

Hongmian Gong, City University of New York, USA (with Fan Yang)

 

Labour mobility geographies & their intermediation in India’s call centre industry

Al James, University of London, UK (with Vira Bhaskar)

 

Regional knowledge dynamics in Swedish biomedicine

Annika Rickne, Lund University, Sweden (with Jens Laage-Hellman)

 

 

1:00 – 2:00 pm

Buffet Lunch (BCGH Level 2 Banquet Hall)

 


 

2:00 – 4:00 pm

Session 4.11 Reflexive economic geographies and China studies 1: a dialogue (Organized by You-tien Hsing) (Hall No.3)

 

Session 4.12 Geography of service economies 1 (Room 2B)

 

Session 4.13 Culture and ethnicity in economic geography 1 (Room 2C)

Chair: Yu Zhou, Vassar College, USA

 

Panelists:

Yuko Aoyama, Clark University, USA

 

Trevor Barnes, University of British Columbia, Canada

 

You-tien Hsing, University of California, USA

 

George Lin, University of Hong Kong

 

Larry Ma, University of Akron, USA

 

Jinn-Yuh Hsu, National Taiwan University

Chair: Peter Daniels, University of Birmingham, UK

 

Spaces of business education

Sarah Hall, University of Nottingham, UK

 

Intra-metropolitan distribution of daily retailing: an historical-geographical analysis of the Ankara case

Gulsen Yilmaz, Gazi University, Turkey

 

Discerning competing and agglomerative effects on retail store performance: an example of Walmart and Kmart stores in Cincinnati

Lin Liu, University of Cincinnati, USA (with Yingru Li)

 

Geographical analysis of banks in Istanbul metropolitan area in Turkey

Sule Karaaslan and Gulsen Yilmaz, Gazi University, Turkey

 

Manufacturing-producer services relationship: a case study of electric and electronic firms in Penang industrial areas

Che Leh Fauziah, University Pendidikan Sultan Idris, Malaysia

 

Micro-practices of globalizing education: branding

Nick Lewis, University of Auckland, New Zealand

Chair: Harvey Neo, National University of Singapore

 

Contemporary Chinese capitalism in practice: case study of the Lion City

Raye Ng, University of Liverpool, UK

 

Contested indigeneity: dichotomy, negotiation, and power of agricultural transformation and tourism development in Fataan, Taiwan

Po-Yi Hung, University of Wisconsin, USA

 

Diversifying highland livelihoods in Northern Vietnam

Sarah Turner, McGill University, Canada

 

Foreign direct investment and cultural change in the southern United States

Jonathan Leib, Florida State University, USA

 

Globalization and architectural practice

Donald McNeill, University of Western Sydney, Australia

 

Neoliberalism and the aestheticization of new middle-class landscapes in post-socialist Shanghai

Choon Piew Pow, National University of Singapore

 

 

 


 

2:00 – 4:00 pm

Session 4.14 Geographies of international trade and investment 5 (Room 201-A)

 

Session 4.15 Clusters and networks 3 (Room 201-B)

 

Session 4.16 Labour geographies 2 (Room 201-C)

Chair: Chris van Egeraat, National University of Ireland

 

Technological innovation, state rationality and design of international agreements: constraints affecting global transfers of technology

Yi Shin Tang, University of Turin, Italy

 

The Chinese shipbuilding challenge: global shifts in production and trade

Marion Eich-Born, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Germany

 

The globalisation of R&D: how about research and technology organisations (RTOs)?

Martin Berger, Institute of Technology and Regional Policy, Austria (with Reinhold Hofer)

 

The Netherlands as a cluster of trade and logistics

Melika Levelt and Pieter Tordoir, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Netherlands

 

The political-economic geography of EU-ASEAN trade

Claes G. Alvstam, Goteborg University, Sweden (with Lena Lindberg)

 

The politics of rice: the KORUS FTA and a changing U.S. Congress

Jeffrey Gower, State University of New York, USA

Chair: Tod Rutherford, Syracuse University, USA

 

Power and networks: the film and television industry

Jennifer Johns, University of Liverpool, UK

 

Provincial clusters? Horizontal relations and business associations in the provinces of Bohol, Cebu and Oriental Negros, the Philippines

Bram van Helvoirt, University of Utrecht, Netherlands

 

Geographical concentration of Chinese manufacturing industries

Canfei He and Pan Fenghua, Peking University, China

 

The role of trading cities in the development of Chinese business clusters

Zhenming Sun, Massey University, New Zealand (with Martin Perry)

 

The making of Hi-Tech enclaves and the politics of social exclusions: a case of Cyberabad (Hyderabad, India)

Diganta Kumar Das, National University of Singapore

 

The state, institutions, and supply networks: the case of the Canadian bicycle industry

Glen Norcliffe, York University, Canada

Chair: Neil Coe, University of Manchester, UK

 

Looking across the divide: industrial decline and adaptability of the labour force in Western European and Southeast Asian contexts

Niels Beerepoot, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands

 

Mobile elite in the global city - international managers' practices and their locational preferences

Rolf Schlunze, Ritsumeikan University, Japan, and Michael Plattner, University of Trier, Germany

 

‘New argonauts’ in Shanghai

Rolf Sternberg, University of Hannover, Germany (With Claudia Mueller)

 

Space as an instrument in constructing labor markets and labor relations

Wei Xu, University of Lethbridge, Canada

 

Taiwan labor ‘Import’ policy: twenty years and counting

Jonathan Walker, James Madison University, USA

 

The development of cybersecurity workforce in the United States

Sharmistha Bagchi-Sen, State University of New York, USA (with Sangmi Chai, H.R. Rao and S. Upadhyaya)

 

4:00 – 4:40 pm

Tea Break (Foyer, Room Nos.2B/C)

 


 

4:40 – 6:00 pm

Session 4.17 Reflexive economic geographies and China studies 2: production processes (Organized by Yu Zhou) (Hall No.3)

 

Session 4.18 Geography of service economies 2 (Room 2B)

 

Session 4.19 Culture and ethnicity in economic geography 2 (Room 2C)

Chair: You-tien Hsing, University of California, USA

 

Panelists:

David Edgington, University of British Columbia, Canada

 

Martina Fromhold-Eisebith, RWTH Aachen University, Germany

 

Meric Gertler, University of Toronto, Canada

 

Eric Sheppard, University of Minnesota, USA

 

Yifei Sun, California State University, USA

 

Xin Tong, Peking University, China

 

Yu Zhou, Vassar College, USA

Chair: Martin Hess, University of Manchester, UK

 

Offshoring and outsourcing by Norwegian organisations

Grete Rusten, University of Bergen, Norway (with John R. Bryson and Mai Stabell)

 

State intervention and the realignment of comparative advantage in a global environment: the case of the services sector in China

Peter Daniels, University of Birmingham, UK (with Y Qui)

 

Study on the status of SMES in the producer services development of China

Yun Zhong, Jinan University, China

 

The service sector as after use on urban potential sites in shrinking cities- the example Berlin

Daniela Schüler, Humboldt University, Germany

 

 

Chair: Choon Piew Pow, National University of Singapore

 

Politics, profits and purity: the restructuring Malaysian pig industry

Harvey Neo, National University of Singapore

 

Slaughterhouses in Mina and the Saudi project for utilization of sacrificial animals

Fayza Mohamed Karim Jan Abdulkaliq, Girls College, Saudi Arabia

 

The makings of a modern Beijing: processes of promotion, transformation and adaptation

Melissa Yang Rock, Pennsylvania State University, USA

 

The local embeddedness of arts industries: a case study of ‘798’ arts district in Beijing

Jimin Zhao, Chinese Academy of Sciences (with Shangyi Zhou)

 


 

4:40 – 6:00 pm

Session 4.20 Geographies of international trade and investment 6 (Room 201-A)

 

Session 4.21 Clusters and networks 4 (Room 201-B)

 

Session 4.22 Labour geographies 3 (Room 201-C)

Chair: Jessie Poon, State University of New York, USA

 

The sogo shosha revisited: 'glocalization' of the Japanese general trading companies

Yoshihiro Miyamachi, Oita University, Japan

 

Trade and investments between China and South Korea. Economical integration by region and geopolitics reconfiguration in Asia-Pacific

Enrique Pino, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Mexico

 

What role for geography and culture in Hong Kong’s foreign trade?

Junsong Wang, Peking University, China (with Canfei He)

 

Why does geography matter? Growing a global company from New Zealand

Christine Tamasy, University of Auckland, New Zealand

Chair: Glen Norcliffe, York University, Canada

 

The study on RMW cluster in the Central China – in the case of three different types of villages in Henan Province

Genghe Gao, Henan University, China (with Xiaojian Li)

 

Theory led by policy? The case of regional cluster policies in Germany

Matthias Kiese, University of Hannover, Germany

 

Towards interscalar network sustainability

Ronald Wall and Bert van der Knaap, Erasmus University, Netherlands

 

Multiple faces of the international advertising industry in the Amsterdam region

Robert Röling, Amsterdam institute for Metropolitan and International Development Studies, Netherlands

Chair: Wei Xu, University of Lethbridge, Canada

 

Working hard but still poor and foreign: returning emigrants in Seoul

Yeong-Hyun Kim, Ohio University, USA

 

Gender differences in commuting and employment in Japan

Masaki Kawase, Hiroshima Shudo University, Japan

 

Globalization, urban economic restructuring and informal employment

James Biles, Indiana University, USA

 

Industry restructuring, mobility and migration: Australia's aviation workforce

Sally Weller, Victoria University, Australia

 

6:00 – 7:00 pm

Plenary Lecture (Hall No.3)

Chair: Henry Yeung, National University of Singapore

 

The neglected king: the customer in the new knowledge ecology of innovation

Professor Gernot Grabher

University of Bonn, Germany

 

 

 

END OF CONFERENCE!!!!


ABSTRACTS OF PAID PARTICIPANTS

(In alphabetical order of first authors’ surnames)

 

Plenary Speakers

 

Hanson, Susan (Plenary Lecture on Monday morning)
Graduate School of Geography, Clark University 950 Main Street, Worcester, MA 01610-1477 USA; Email: shanson@clarku.edu
People and place in economic geography: Learning from women’s entrepreneurship
At the heart of economic geography is the relationship between people and place. Feminism has fostered new ways of thinking within economic geography, but the impacts have been largely confined to issues of labor and worlds of work. Examining entrepreneurship through a feminist lens illustrates new ways of thinking in economic geography that link to labor but go well beyond worlds of work to illuminate the relationship between people and place. I use studies of entrepreneurship as a gendered geographic process, undertaken in various places around the world, to show how people and place emerge in tandem. Of particular interest are (1) what is the object of study and what are the goals of economic geography, (2) why use gender and entrepreneurship as a way into thinking about the relationship between people and place, (3) why emphasize diversity, difference, heterogeneity—of both people and place—in processes of co-creation of people and place, and (4) what are the implications of these ideas for the practice of economic geography within and outside of academe?

 

Clark, Gordon (Plenary Lecture on Tuesday eevening)
Centre for Employment, Work and Finance, Oxford University Centre for the Environment, South Parks Rd., Oxford OX1 3QY, UK

Email: gordon.clark@ouce.ox.ac.uk

Governing finance

Financial institutions rule-the-world: they can price all kinds of tangible assets from corporate capacity to urban infrastructure and are in the market for intangible assets like brand imagine and reputation. From the smallest unit of activity to whole nations, financial institutions price expected returns while discounting and distributing the risks of adverse outcomes. While the regulation of financial institutions and markets is the subject of extensive research and policy practice, it is apparent that regulation often comes second to governance: that is, regulation is often there to clean-up unanticipated failures of governance in the internal management and performance of private financial institutions. In part, this is because of the economic scale and geographical scope of financial institutions compared to nation-state regulators. In this paper, I develop a three-part argument about the nature and significance of the ‘governance’ issue noting what is distinctive about financial institutions and markets as well as the problems of interest-alignment and the conflict over expertise and representation. To illustrate my argument, a set of examples are noted with the penultimate section devoted to an assessment of the issue in relation to emerging themes in globalization. Here, it is suggested that the governance of financial institutions may be more important than the nation-state regulation of financial markets for the development of the global economy.

 

Grabher, Gernot (Plenary Lecture on Thursday evening)
Socio-Economics of Space, University of Bonn, Meckenheimer Allee 166 D-53115 Bonn, Germany, Email: grabher@giub.uni-bonn.de
The neglected king: the customer in the new knowledge ecology of innovation
‘The customer is king’, of course. Despite this universal mantra, the role of the customer so far seemed confined to a passive recipient of products at the terminus of the value chain. More recently, however, this traditional perception has been challenged. On the one hand, users are increasingly appreciated as reflexive actors who are actively involved in the evaluation, modification and configuration of products. In fields like software, computer-games or sports equipment, for example, users are even ascribed entrepreneurial and innovative functions. On the other hand, firms are seeking to tap into new pools of knowledge in their relentless search for new sources of innovation. Beyond the established repertoire to access external knowledge through alliances and collaborative arrangements with R&D-institutions, firms increasingly attempt to harness user knowledge. These two concurrent shifts, however, do not result in a smooth convergence. Rather they open up a highly contested terrain on which habitual distinctions between producer and user are blurred. The prime aim of this paper is to map out the evolving terrain of user-producer interaction in innovation processes. More specifically, I will firstly contrast more traditional approaches to incorporate customer knowledge with an emerging class of innovative user-producer relationships, provisionally dubbed ‘co-development’. This preliminary term is intended to denote three key features: an increasing role of hybrid communities that involve unconventional combinations of experts and laymen; a re-distribution of power between users and producers; and novel modes of sharing knowledge and exerting control afforded by social software. Secondly, I propose a typology of different modes of co-development that is organized along two dimensions. The first dimension indicates the degree of user-involvement and stretches from producer-initiated consultation to user-initiated generation of knowledge. The second dimension differentiates between deliberate knowledge production in epistemic communities on the one hand and knowledge production as a by-product of practicing communities, on the other. The resulting typology seeks to capture the heterogeneity of co-development approaches and to provide a conceptual template for further empirical research into user-involvement in innovation. Finally, I will speculate about some wider implications of co-development practices for theorizing social and spatial dynamics of knowledge production in economic geography.

 

Paid Participants

 

Abdulkaliq, Fayza Mohamed Karim Jan (Session 4.19)

Girls College in Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, P. O. Box 13062, Jeddah 21493, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Email: fayzahkareem@hotmail.com

Slaughterhouses in Mina and the Saudi project for utilization of sacrificial animals

Since Allah exhorts Muslim people to make pilgrimage to Makkah , there has been hajj-related activities to ‘Al-Nnahr Nosok’, the sacrificial animals offered by pilgrimage goers. This activity happens once a year, in a specific place and for a limited time of four days, therefore slaughterhouses in Mina are unique examples of industrial location.

The Saudi project for the utilization of sacrificial hajj meat was implemented by the Islamic Development Bank. This meat has been distributed among the poor around the Holy Haram in Makkah and the charitable organizations in Saudi Arabia. Excess sacrificial meat has been transported and distributed to many Muslim countries.

 

Abu Muhammad, Shajaat Ali (Session 4.2)

Department of Social Sciences, The University of Texas at Tyler, 3900 University Blvd, Tyler, Texas 75799 USA; Email: aali@mail.uttyl.edu

2005 Famine in Northern Bangladesh: an ecological analysis
A country of 144 million people living on 144000 km2, Bangladesh is one of the most overcrowded countries on earth. Over the past 36 years since its independence, Bangladesh’s population has doubled and the nation has been able to double her food production via major technological changes which included multiple cropping of high yielding rice during both wet and dry seasons respectively with the help of monsoon rains and low lift pump irrigation. Use of chemical fertilizers has also resulted in major yield increments. While much success has been achieved in agriculture growth, rural development and poverty alleviation initiatives, there have been multiple occurrences of severe food shortage and famine in several districts in Northern Bangladesh. One such occurrence was in October of 2005 when Kurigram, Rangpur, Nilphamari, Lalmonirhat, Rangpur and Gaibanda districts in Northern Bangladesh had experienced severe famine that affected 9 million people and caused 40 reported deaths. The present study explores the demographic, environmental, socio-economic and institutional causes of this famine.

 

Ahmed, Waquar (Session 4.8)

Graduate School of Geography, Clark University, 950 Main Street, Worcester, MA 01610, USA; Email: wahmed@clarku.edu

Spaces of power: foreign direct investment in India

The Indian state tries to attract foreign direct investment (FDI) to achieve economic growth and promote development. Civil society institutions strongly influence investment and development. Investment therefore becomes the focus of a series of contentions. I have examined these through the lens of the former Enron subsidiary, the Dabhol Power Corporation, in Maharashtra, India. Objectives: These are - examining the impact of neoliberal discourses on the Indian state; the role of governments in attracting FDI; how civil society influencing the state on questions of FDI; and how the state manages problems and contestations on issues related to FDI.

Alam, M. Shamsul (Session 1.11)

Department of Geography & Environmental Studies, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi 6205, Bangladesh; Email: alam_ges@ru.ac.bd

Food security in Bangladesh: present state and challenges ahead

Bangladesh, the country once known as a bottomless basket, has over the years achieved remarkable progress in increasing food grain production for her burgeoning population. But insecurity has remained for many in spite of the impressive gain per capita food production; the problem of hunger and poverty still persists. The country is still a long way from achieving food security for all even if the total food bundle is considered. The paper examines the various dimensions of food security and its linkages in the country. The results shows the challenges ahead in this respect are meeting the balanced dietary requirements and the issue of resource use and resource degradation in a positive and negative way. The study also highlights various programmes of the government to meet such challenges and achieve food security for all in the country.

 


Ala-Rämi, Katariina (Session 1.10)

Department of Geography, P.O.Box 3000, 90014 University of Oulu, Finland; Email: katariina.alarami@oulu.fi

Collaborative networks in product development: case study of software companies in Oulu

In an increasingly globalised economy, the competitiveness of an urban region depends on how well firms adjust to increasing competition and growing complexity. In knowledge-based sectors, networks of actors are considered vitally important in keeping a firm’s information and know-how up to date. This study discusses the limitations of distant collaboration and the city’s urban scale and diversity in developing growth clusters. It uses a specific case as an example to explore knowledge transfer in product development. It studies social networking in collaborative product development and the role of physical and temporary clusters and ICT in that development.

 

Alimoradi, Ali (Session 1.7)
Islamic Azad University, Rasht branch, Urban Planning Depaprtment ,Rasht, Gilan, Iran; Email: ali_igl@yahoo.com

Economic rent and its impact on landuse in South Western Caspian Sea.

Extra value in urban fields has a negative effect on development planning. More than small town, growth rate of cities, distribution of cities and its texture could capture agricultural land in South West of Caspian Sea. The aim of this paper is in recognition of urban planning effects on economical extra value agricultural land. The research method for this paper has used from fieldwork with statistical date and economical analysis. The results have shown that the connection and inclusion of hinterland of the town close to each other, especially in the littoral strip, have also caused the formation of a connected and attached area which in turn has brought some problems for the management of space.

 

Allen, Emma (Session 4.2)

Centre of Full Employment and Equity (CofFEE), University of Newcastle, University Dr, Callaghan 2308, NSW, Australia

Email: emma.allen@studentmail.newcastle.edu.au

Actualising community development

Unmet remains persistent within our communities, and the prevalence of punitive policies and tokenistic interventions only seeks to further entrench societal disparities. This paper reports research findings from a national survey, in conjunction with data from Local Government Social Plans, revealing consistency of unmet need across space, with particular attention directed towards need for proactive initiatives concerning promotion of public health and safety. To promote community development this analysis indicates an urgent need for more progressive, spatially aware policies as the only feasible long term solution and suggests an alternative paradigm in employment policy as a possible way forward.

 

Ambinakudige, Shrinidhi (Session 4.2)

Department of Geosciences Mississippi State University Mississippi State, MS 39762, USA; Email: ssa60@msstate.edu

A storm in a coffee cup: coffee open market and the local livelihoods in India

For coffee growers and workers in Asia, Africa and Latin America, development of coffee as an international commodity regulated by national and international institutions had helped to sustain livelihoods. Deregulation of coffee market in 1990s forced the coffee growers to directly enter the unknown territory of international market. Growers were left alone fighting against the cultivation challenges on one hand and highly competitive international market on the other hand. This study found that in India, peasants and the tribal people became more vulnerable to coffee market volatility when the global and national coffee institutional measures to regulate the market were removed.

 

Aoyama, Yuko1 and Power, Dominic2 (Session 2.4)

1Graduate School of Geography, Clark University 950 Main Street, Worcester, MA 01610-1477 USA, 2Dept. of Social and Economic Geography , Uppsala University, Box 513, S-751 20 Uppsala, Sweden

Email: yaoyama@clarku.edu

User-led innovation, knowledge and economic geography

Growing numbers of economic geographers are now focusing on economic actors that have previously been marginalized in our accounts of innovation and competitiveness: users and consumers. With boundaries between producers and users breaking down into ever more complex innovation dynamics it is important that economic geography addresses the issue of users’ create and negotiate knowledge. In particular, we need to think rigorously about how users can be incorporated into existing models and approaches of knowledge and innovation. The presentation questions how we should conceptualize users and consumers and where we should place them in space and in economic knowledge processes.

 


Araki, Hitoshi (Session 2.11)

Faculty of Education, Yamaguchi University, 1677-1 Yoshida Yamaguchi 753-8513 Japan; Email: arakih@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp

Chicken and egg supply under the outbreak of Avian Influenza in Japan, 2004: what was the polluted food?

 Issues concerning food quality and safety are becoming ever more important with, for example, risks from BSE and genetic engineering. To better understand how such issues can affect food supply system in Japan, we investigated the effects of an outbreak of avian influenza that occurred at an egg farm in Yamaguchi prefecture, in January 2004. Two times of interview survey on ten supermarkets in Yamaguchi city were conducted to find out what countermeasures they took after the outbreak. The results showed that perceptions of food quality could have a greater impact than the real quality on the food supply system.

 

Asheim, Björn1, Coenen, Lars1, Moodysson, Jerker2 and Rickne, Annika1 (Session 2.23)

1Abildgaardsgade 5, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark, Lund University 2Department for Social and Economic Geography, Lund University, Sweden, Email: lars.coenen@circle.lu.se
Differentiated knowledge bases, distributed knowledge networks and the role of sectoral and regional innovation systems: the case of biotechnology

Biotechnology is affecting and reshaping innovation activities in existing sectors, such as pharmaceuticals, agriculture and food while also giving rise to the emergence of novel sectors such as bioinformatics. There is a large variety of knowledge sources and inputs used by firms and there is increased interdependence among actors Thus, the knowledge creation process becomes increasingly inserted into various forms of networks at regional, national and international levels This paper investigates the role of biotechnology as a platform technology in a system of innovation perspective and the challenges it poses to the sectoral and geographical boundaries of innovation system.

 

Atia, Mona (Session 1.14)

Department of Geography, University of Washington, Box 353550, Seattle, WA 98915, USA; Email: atia@u.washington.edu

The geography of Islamic banking and finance

This paper seeks to understand the transnational nature of Islamic Banking and Finance (IBF) and to pay attention to the distinctive forms that IBF takes in different places. I discuss the various facets of Islamic economics and the translation of this philosophy into material economic practices, illustrating that important distinctions exist between Islamic economic theory and on the ground practices. I illustrate these differences by examining the manifestation of IBF in diverse geographical locations. In addition, I consider the relationship between IBF and broader economic developments such as neoliberalism.

 

Bagchi-Sen, Sharmistha, Chai, Sangmi and Rao, H, and Upadhyaya, S. (Session 4.16)

Department of Geography 105 Wilkeson Quad State University of New York – Buffalo Buffalo, NY 14261, USA; Email: geosbs@buffalo.edu

The development of cybersecurity workforce in the United States: a study of institutional intervention and career choice
Since cybersecurity is developing as one of the critical areas in the Information Technology (IT) field with not enough skilled people to fill the area, the United States government has tried to address the shortfall in this area via a National Science Foundation (NSF) scholarship program in order to increase the number of trained and certified cybersecurity workforce. Yet to date, there is no academic research about the cybersecurity workforce and career choices about information assurance and the computer security field, though there have been many such studies in the general IT area. This study examines relationships between students' career attitudes and cybersecurity career choices based on the theory of reasoned action. The research studies Scholarship for Service (SFS) scholars who are funded by the NSF for pursuing information assurance and computer security study at the university level. Based on survey results from 157 respondents, the study finds that positive attitude and image of cybersecurity career have a strong impact on students' cybersecurity career decisions. Further, perceived career barriers and usefulness of cybersecurity education have a positive impact on students' career decisions. The survey analysis results and implications of this research are presented.

Baklanov, Peter (Session 2.1)
Radio Str., Bld. 7, Pacific Institute of Geography, Far Eastern Branch, RAS, 690041, Vladivostok, Russia; Email: baklanov@tig.dvo.ru
Territorial structures of economy in management by sustainable development of the region
Territorial structures of economy are identified as net double-layer formations: a spatial layer is formed by territorial compact enterprises with combinations of enterprises, companies, trading-logistical centers etc. interacting with them; a territorial layer is formed by the places of location of enterprises, a zone of resource- ecological and social-infrastructural connectedness, and market zones of resource and consumptive structures. The entire links of territorial economic structures are identified as territorial systems - for the goals of analysis, modeling and management. Matrix models to analyze their structural dynamics are offered. Functions of management by territorial structures of economy, their systems-on the stages of investment projects, construction, functioning, and innovations with evaluation of their contribution into economic, social and ecological quality of regional development in sustainable, balanced development of the region are under consideration.

 

Balej, Martin and Andel, Jirí (Session 1.6)

Department of Geography Faculty of Science JE Purkinje University Ceske mladeze 8, Usti nad Labem 400 96, Czech Republic

Email: balej@sci.ujep.cz

Development of economy in Central European countries with relation to environmental stress changes (case study from Czech-German borderland)

The article shows the possibility to apply the concept of the Theory of growth poles and the World-system theory upon socioeconomic processes in progress on levels lower than the global one. The case study attests the existence of specific socioeconomic features of the Central European area and Czech-German borderland (regional and local levels) that was acquired in this area in the so-called transformation period (second half of 20th Century). An exceptionally dynamic process of transition from centrally-directed economy into market economy influenced not only all spheres of national economy but its impacts were manifested also in the social, political, cultural and mainly environmental spheres.

 

Banski, Jerzy (Session 1.4)
Institute of Geography and Spatial Organization, Polish Academy of Sciences, 00-818 Warsaw, Twarda 51/55, Poland

Email: jbanski@twarda.pan.pl

Conceptions of spatial development in Poland

Three main periods can be distinguished, during which the majority of concepts and projects regarding the spatial development of Poland were created: the post war years, the seventies and the current period. Undoubtedly the most daring and far reaching concept was worked up just after the Second World War. Its basic point consisted in decentralization of industry and alleviating regional discrepancies in development. Over the 70s, a large number of various concepts were developed. The system of the moderate polycentric concentration and the task of moving a part of the industrial potential to less developed regions reflected an attempt to create a more balanced spatial structure. The Plan was overly optimistic and became a part of the then propaganda of success. A theory of polarized development forms the basis of the contemporary concepts. It assumes that innovations and other developmental factors will gradually spread from the growth areas to broadly understood peripheries. The whole post war period is characterized by an ever increasing polarization of space, in extreme cases leading to emergence of poverty areas. In spite of changes in administrative system of the country, as well as changes in socio-economic structure and totally new geopolitical environment, there is still a lack of a modern vision for the future shape of Poland.

 

Barros Nock, Maria Magdalena Guadalupe

Juarez 87, Tlalpan, Mexico City 14000, Mexico

Email: barros@ciesas.edu.mx

Swap meets and the social construction of space: the case of Mexican vendors

Swap meets have a long tradition in the San Joaquin Valley in California and they have gone through important changes through the decades were different ethnic groups have tried their luck as vendors in the market. In the 40s and 50s, mainly Anglo- Saxons sold used products and antiques in the market. In the 60s and 70s, Asians starting selling new products such as under ware, socks and shirts, by the end of the 70s and 80s, Mexican vendors started trying their entrepreneurial skills at the swap meets. These days, 95 per cent of vendors are of Mexican origin, selling produce for the Mexican families, the so-called nostalgia commodities but also all sorts of produce necessary for any household. In this paper I describe these swap meets and the role that Mexican immigrants have played in their development. The data used in this paper was gathered in a four month field work period carried out in central valley during which 17 swap meets were studied and more than 40 vendors were interviewed.

 

Barnes, Trevor1 and Sheppard, Eric2 (Session 2.13)
1Department of Geography, 1984 West Mall, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z2 Canada; 2Department of Geography, 414 social sciences tower, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis MN 55455

Email: tbarnes@geog.ubc.ca

The importance of ‘trailing ands’: economic geography as engaged pluralism

While fecund and dynamic, economic geography is fragmented into a series of intellectual solitudes that reinforce isolation, and monologues. Inspired by science studies and feminism, we argue for an engaged pluralist approach to economic geography, based on conversation, translation, and the creation of ‘trading zones.’ We envision a determined anti-monist and anti-reductionist engagement across, and recognition of, the diverse range of ‘local epistemologies’ circulating in the discipline: A politics of difference rather than of consensus or popularity. GIS has transformed itself over the last decade by embracing an engaged pluralism, creating new forms of knowledge. Similar possibilities exist for economic geography.

 

Bayliss, Darrin (Session 2.20)

Department of Geography, University of Copenhagen, Įstervoldgade 10, 1350 Copenhagen C, Denmark; Email: db@geogr.ku.dk

Dublin’s digital hubris: lessons from an attempt to develop a creative digital cluster
To develop a more sustainable knowledge economy in Ireland, state initiatives seek to develop the ICT sector, not least by investing in research and attempting to link economic development policy to exploiting the knowledge resources of third level and other research institutions.  Dublin’s Digital Hub project presents an example of this policy, based in large part upon attempts to link digital media enterprise and entrepreneurship with research and development and educational sectors.  Launched in 2000, the Digital Hub was intended to be an exciting industrial cluster of the future employing thousands of media, technology and creative workers, as well as a district boasting apartments, retail units and leisure areas.  However seven years after its inception, only two of the total nine acre site have been in any way developed, and serious doubts persist over the project’s viability.  This paper contours the rise and fall of the project, suggesting lessons to be learned from this attempt to plan and develop a creative digital cluster.

 

Beaverstock, Jonathan V. 1, Faulconbridge, James R. 2, Hall, Sarah E J1, and Hewitson, Andrew1

1Department of Geography, Loughborough University, Loughborough, UK; 2Department of Geography, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK

Email: j.v.beaverstock@lboro.ac.uk

Spaces of professionalisation: (re)producing the role of executive search in elite labour recruitment

Being ‘professional’ and purveying an aura of ‘professionalism’ is vital for the survival of headhunters in the market for executive search. By drawing on both cultural economy in economic geography and the sociology of the professions discourses, we tease out an apparent disjuncture between headhunters’ favouring an approach of relational rhetorical legitimacy and ‘professionalism in practice’ to ‘professionalisation’ and the industry’s regulatory bodies attempting to create a more traditional model of professionalism, based around closure and exclusivity. We conclude by considering the importance of these different models of ‘professionalisation’ for the continued growth and internationalisation of the headhunting industry.

 

Beerepoot, Niels (Session 4.16)
Department of Geography, Planning and International Development Studies, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Email: n.p.c.beerepoot@uva.nl
Looking across the divide: industrial decline and adaptability of the labour force in Western European and Southeast Asian contexts
This paper uses the analysis of the adaptability of the labour force in the aftermath of industrial decline in North East England and in the Philippines as starting point for a discussion on the divide between economic geography and development geography. The fall and restructuring of industrial regions has long been the subject for research in Western Europe, but is a new phenomenon in Southeast Asia. Here, many examples can be found of industrial regions that, under conditions of deepening globalisation, are confronted with a situation of distress as more and more industrial activities are shifted to neighbouring low-cost countries (like Vietnam and China). Comparative analyses of regions (and its place-bound labour) in the North and South, confronted with similar challenges, can contribute to ending this divide within geography and enable the development of a globally integrated geography discourse.

 

Benner, Chris (Session 4.10)

302 Walker Building, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802. USA; Email: cbenner@psu.edu

International outsourcing and new forms of eWork: an economic boom for Africa?

One of the most promising opportunities for new employment creation in Africa is the growth of call centers and business process outsourcing (BPO). Poor infrastructure, quality concerns and cultural differences, however, limit the growth potential. This paper compares call centers and BPO operations in Mauritius, Botswana and Ghana. It identifies which types of outsourced services are growing in each country and the reason why they are growing there. The paper argues that for African nations to benefit from future growth, they must address key human resource challenges that undermine long-term sustainability in these types of outsourced work processes.

 

Berger, Martin and Hofer, Reinhold (Session 4.14)

Joanneum Research Forschungsgesellschaft mbH Institute of Technology and Regional Policy Haus der Forschung, Sensengasse 1 A- 1090 Wien, Austria; Email: martin.berger@joanneum.at

The globalisation of R&D: how about research and technology organisations (RTOs)? Some conceptual notions and qualitative insights
Recently, the internationalisation of business R&D has received much attention. Much less attention has been paid to another group of actors within national systems of innovation: namely, non-university research and technology organisations (RTOs). The paper aims to conceptualise this very diverse sector and to ascertain how its characteristics influence RTOs’ internationalisation propensity. Since China is/ will be one of the principal destinations for R&D-related foreign direct investment, we present empirical findings about five European RTOs having set up representative offices in China. We conclude by tentatively comparing the internationalisation process between enterprises and RTOs.

 

Bergmann, Luke1, Sheppard, Eric1, and Plummer, Paul2 (Session 1.4)

1University of Minnesota, 414 Social Sciences Building, 267 - 19th Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN, USA 55455; 2University of Calgary, Canada Email: berg1388@umn.edu

Capitalism beyond harmonious equilibrium: mathematics as if human agency mattered

In narrating a world of flux, it can be useful to move beyond assuming equilibria. We employ complexity mathematics to represent unevenly shifting economic landscapes: modeling spatiotemporal dynamics in multiregional, multisectoral economies, beyond equilibrium. Our approach highlights many points of potential interest, including: 1) the unexpectedly heightened dynamical importance of regions in a globally connected world, 2) that cherished theoretical principles (e.g. supply and demand) become re-negotiated as relationality leads to emergence, and 3) that it is both possible and interesting to make space for human agency, through modeling praxis appropriate to ‘incomplete systems’.

 

Berndt, Christian (Session 2.8)
Department of Human Geography, University of Frankfurt, Robert-Mayer-Str. 6-8, 60325 Frankfurt/Main, Germany

Email: c.berndt@em.uni-frankfurt.de

Market b/orders: performing transnational production-consumption-networks

Stylized debates of globalization processes often overlook that movements of capital, goods and people are set in ambivalent frames always involving de-bordering and bordering processes at the same time. In this context, the success of transnational economic integration projects depends on the ability of decision-makers to keep these paradoxes under control, for instance by celebrating certain cross-border mobilities and connections while veiling others (‘smart border regimes’). Expanding the commodity chain concept with the notion of performativity and with insights from praxis theory and the ‘new mobilities paradigm’, the paper illustrates the processes at work on the example of Nafta.

 

Beyers, William B. (Session 2.5)

Department of Geography, University of Washington, Box 353550, Seattle, WA 98195-3550, USA; Email: beyers@u.washington.edu

Revisiting the geography of the new economy

The phrase ‘New Economy’ emerged in the late 1990’s to characterize the impacts of the change in productivity associated with the widespread adoption of information technologies (IT) in advanced economies on the geography of production systems. These impacts included shifts in the structure of industrial production and occupations in advanced and developing economies. With the ‘.dot-com’ bust, attention drifted away from this concept, but with economic recovery in the last few years it is important to re-examine the relevance of this conceptualization on the part of economic geographers. This paper addresses this research need, building upon analyses for regions in the United States, with an extension of considerations of key dimensions to other countries.

 

Bhattacharyya, Rituparna (Sarma) (Session 2.9)
University of Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, 57 Newington Drive, Preston Grange, North Shields, Tyne and Wear, United Kingdom, NE29 9 JA
Email: rituparna.sarma@ncl.ac.uk
‘Selective westernisation’: an example from Assam

Recent structural reforms and economic liberalism of India are having a positive impact on at least middle class women’s lives, by creating new job opportunities and improving access to higher education. Alongside such positive impacts, the social geography of India, particularly with respect to its urban multicultural market spaces, has redefined the lifestyles of hundreds and thousands of city dwellers including young women wearing trendy clothes, threatens to undermine traditional Indian modes of dress and ways of life. Given these competing trends, this paper develops a theoretical framework to explain how people deal with selective westernisation on the ground. This paper focuses on the specific case of Assam, located in the north-eastern part of India and within it a sub-population of young, middle class, educated Assamese women. The exercise draws on in-depth interviews and focus groups conducted with a sample of students pursuing higher education in different educational institutes of Assam. The narrative analysis reveals the tensions arising from ‘selective westernisation’ where young women find their freedom of movement severely restricted in public by sexual harassment is symbolic of the advancing threat of heightened cultural globalisation: the proliferation of ‘immodest’ (western) modes of dress. However, the manifestation of this process is locally specific and highly uneven and contradictory.

Biles, James J. (Session 4.22)
Department of Geography, Indiana University, 114 Student Building, Bloomington, IN 47405-7100 USA; Email: jbiles@indiana.edu

Globalization, urban economic restructuring and informal employment

Globalization has brought about profound changes in urban economies throughout Latin America, with concomitant implications for the livelihoods of those who live and work in cities. In light of the structural reforms associated with globalization, recent research stresses the need to reconceptualize the nature of work and the role of informal employment. This paper, based on a survey of nearly 600 households in the city of Mérida, Mexico, employs an expanded typology of informal employment to assess the livelihoods of those who work informally and identifies patterns of mobility between and within formal and informal sectors of the urban economy.

 

Boschma, Ron (Session 2.10)
Utrecht University, PO Box 80 155, 3508 TC Utrecht, The Netherlands

Email: r.boschma@geo.uu.nl

Related variety and regional development
Related variety is a promising concept in Evolutionary Economic Geography. Examples taken from economic history tends to suggest its empirical relevance for regional development. If a pervasive feature, it implies that long-term development of regions depends on their ability to diversify into new applications and new sectors while building on their current knowledge base and competences. First, we explain what related variety is, and why it may affect long-term economic development. Then, we present some studies that have made an attempt to assess its importance at the firm level and at the regional level. At the firm level, we will present a long-term case study of the spatial evolution of the British automobile industry since 1895. At the regional level, we present an empirical study that accounts for the effect of related variety on economic performance of Italian regions during the period 1995-2005.

 

Breau, Sébastien1 and Rigby, David2 (Session 2.17)

1Department of Geography, McGill University, 805 Sherbrooke St. West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H3A 2K6, 2Dept of Geography, University of California Los Angeles LOS ANGELES, CA 90095, USA

Email: sebastien.breau@mcgill.ca

Exports and plant productivity in Southern California: analysis using the Longitudinal Research Database, 1987-1997

This paper investigates the relationship between plant productivity and export market participation in Southern California using unpublished plant-level data from the US Census Bureau’s Longitudinal Research Database. Two key questions are examined: (i) do plants that export learn in foreign markets and become more efficient and/or (ii) do more efficient plants self-select into export markets. Analytical results support previous claims that more productive plants tend to self-select into export markets. Little support is found for the learning-by-exporting argument.

 

Breathnach, Proinnsias (Session 4.8)

Department of Geography, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, County Kildare, Ireland; Email: Proinnsias.Breathnach@nuim.ie

Spatial dimensions of foreign direct investment in export services: evidence from Ireland

Investments in service activities now dominate global flows of foreign direct investment (FDI).  A significant proportion of such investment involves the use of overseas locations as bases for serving export markets.    Originally dominated by low-grade employment in such activities as call centres and data processing, FDI in services has been moving up the value chain due to a combination of developments in information technology, locational incentives and the availability in certain regions of supplies of skilled workers.  This paper shows how these considerations have influenced the evolution of export services in Ireland, where services now account for over one third of total exports.

 

Burnett, Rebecca (Session 2.9)

University of Washington, Department of Geography, Box 353550, Seattle, WA 98195 USA; Email: rburnett@u.washington.edu

Neoliberal economic restructuring and representations of the Black welfare queen

My paper investigates the welfare reform plan of 1996 and how this affected representations of welfare recipients in the media. By historicizing the role of welfare in the United States, I examine how neoliberal economic restructuring has shifted discourses surrounding welfare. Through an analysis of news articles from 1996 to 2006, I argue that welfare reform reflected a regulatory project aimed at impoverished communities in general and nonwhite mothers in particular. I argue that the changes in welfare target an imagined ‘welfare queen’ and that this raced and gendered stereotype is used to enact punitive regulations on the poor.

 


Carroll, Michael1, Smith, Bruce2 and Reid, Neil3 (Session 2.7)
1109 South Hall - Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH, 43403 USA 2Department of Geography, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403, USA, 3Department of Geography and Planning, The University of Toledo, Ohio 43606, USA

Email: neil.reid@utoledo.edu

Social network analysis in cluster-based economic development

Cluster-based economic development can be viewed as a network-driven strategy stressing communication among cluster participants. This research is a case study of the social networks in a northwestern Ohio greenhouse cluster that has been developing since 2003. We map the networks through which participants share knowledge, particularly innovations, and engage in collective learning. Through this mapping, we identify information gatekeepers in the greenhouse cluster. The utility of this analysis for the strategic management of the cluster is evaluated. This paper is the initial phase of a larger project focusing on the role of networks in local economic development.

 

Chaminade, Cristina, Coenen, Lars and Vang, Jan (Session 2.10)

CIRCLE Lund University, PO BOX 117, 22100 Lund, Sweden

Email: cristina.chaminade@circle.lu.se

Learning from the Bangalore experience: the role of universities in an emerging regional innovation system

This paper is concerned with the role of universities and public research organizations initiating and sustaining the development of regional innovation systems in developing countries. It focuses the discussion on the Bangalore software cluster. Innovation systems research has paid significant attention to the importance of universities and other publicly financed research institutions as engines of growth and innovative performance in regions. With noble exceptions, these papers tend to ignore the specific context in which this interaction between the university and the industry takes place, that is, the specific competences and capabilities of the universities and the firms’ specific needs, particularly in developing countries. The papers aims at reducing this gap by making an empirically-based analysis of the role that universities can play in initiating, sustaining and deepening Bangalore’s regional innovation system for the IT-service and software industry embedding the discussion on the specificities of the strategies of the firms and the universities located in the cluster.

 


Chen, Guo (Session 2.3)

Pennsylvania State University, 304 Walker, University Park, PA 16802, USA; Email: guc110@psu.edu

State, market, and those in-between: the changing geography of poverty in urban China

This paper explores the changing political economy and role of state in China and their spatial consequences: (1) a devolution of inequality; (2) a shift of opportunity and despair at the regional level; and (3) the formation of spaces of despair within cities and their impacts on the poor. The paper demonstrates the fallacies of conventional understandings about China’s transitional economy and the state- market dichotomy. The intertwined, mutually contributive opportunity structures embedded in both the market-oriented economy and pre-existing institutions in China have changed some lives at unprecedented rates, and left some others permanently behind.

 

Chen, Lihui1 and Gibson, Katherine2 (Session 1.14)

1College of Resources, Environment and Earth Science, Yunnan University 2 Cuihu Beilu, Kunming P.R. China 65009, 2Department of Human Geography, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia

Email: chenlh@ynu.edu.cn

Diversity economy and flexible management on land use of Lahu minority in Jinghong, southwest of China

Local action is close related with the globe sustainable development. There are many disputes of impacts on traditional knowledge and culture. Based on the analysis of the decision-making on land use of Lahu minority in Jinghong, this paper gave a demonstration on diversity economy. The results indicate the co-existing of capitalism with others. Further, this study shows the importance of policy and information access to the local and suggests more flexible management in order to provide the possibility on diversity economy.

 

Chen, Yiu Por (Session 4.5)

DePaul University, 25 E. Jackson Blvd, Suite 1250, Chicago, IL 60604, USA; Email: ychen16@depaul.edu

Land use rights, the informal economy, and labor policy change in China (1980-4)

This is the first paper that analyzes factors that contributed to the growth of urban informal product and labor market development in China from 1980 to 1984, a critical period in the country’s market transition. I argue that the 1980s Household Responsibility System (HRS), which brought family farming back from the communal system, endowed rural households not only with land use rights but also with de facto labor allocation and output control rights. This paper shows the way shifts in property utilization rights induced another sequence of institutional changes that led to the rise of rural-urban labor migration in China.

 

Choo, Sungjae (Session 4.4)

Department of Geography, Kyunghee University, Seoul 130-701, Korea

Email: sjchoo@khu.ac.kr

A loosely-articulated cluster: the case of the Korean motion picture industry

This study aims to explain the emergence of Gangnam Region of Seoul as a new cluster of the Korean film industry in the context of its history of growth, recent development characteristics, and its production system. Statistical analyses of Korean industries and in-depth interview surveys to film producers were conducted. The results of the analyses show that there has been an obvious tendency of film makers' move from Chungmuro, a traditional cluster of Korean film industry, to Gangnam, or the many births of new film makers in Gangnam. This new cluster, however, is focused on informal networking between film makers and related personnel, not on formalized production systems composed of specialized functions and labor markets. Therefore, it could be called a 'loosely-articulated cluster'. This form of cluster has much to do with the production milieu of Gangnam, such as advantages of obtaining information and consumer trends, a diverse atmosphere which makes it easier to meet diverse people, a favorable environment to embed creativity and fresh ideas, etc. This trend of the film industry to orient a specific area can be explained in conjunction with the uniqueness of the film industry, such as uncertainty, project-based work, generation gap between film makers, and the participation of large companies and the increasing size of their investment.

 

Chi, Charlene (Session 2.6)
Ohio State University, 6394 Windcliff Drive Grove City, OH 43123, USA
Email: chi.39@osu.edu 

‘NGOzation’ of the Third World: a study of donors, NGOs, and the poor

I examine why increases in foreign government donor – NGO partnered development projects have failed to increase the welfare of the recipient poor in developing countries. Rational choice theory and the capabilities approach form the framework for studying the relationships between donors, NGOs, and the poor. Principal-agent problems indicate that divergent interests between donors and the poor lead NGOs to abide by donor, not poor interests. This lack of representation and accountability to the poor is worsened under conditions of asymmetric information. Opportunistic NGOs crowd out poor-representative NGOs from donor selections and obstruct information updates. The combination of these relationship characteristics leads to ineffective development projects.

 

Coe, Neil (Session 4.10)
School of Environment and Development, Geography, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK

Email: neil.coe@manchester.ac.uk

Temporary staffing agencies and the changing nature of the Japanese labour market

The temporary staffing industry has undergone significant growth and internationalization over the past decade. This paper explores the nature and dynamics of the emerging temporary staffing sector in Japan. The opportunities for staffing companies are enormous: the market is already one-third the size of the US and continues to show strong growth. Using case study evidence collected in 2006, we argue that the interaction between transnational agencies and national regulatory systems needs to be seen as contingent and context-specific. In Japan, leading transnational agencies have struggled to gain market share in a context where large domestic agencies have emerged as the key players.

 

Corneloup, Jean1, Mao, Pascal and Obin, Oliver (Session 2.18)

1CERMOSEM – Institut de Géographie Alpine, Université Joseph Fourier, Domaine Olivier de Serres, 07 170 Mirabel, FRANCE

Email: j.corneloup@libertysurf.fr

The cultural labelling of natural tourist areas

Tourist sites in natural areas constitute a remarkable subject of study for better understanding the way in which the local area or territory participates in the production of a localised cultural system (LCS). Indeed, while the economic function of such sites consists in producing wealth for the entrepreneurs proposing multiple services to the tourists present on the sites, it seems simplistic to consider a tourist destination as being no more than a simple aggregation of actors. The existence of ties with the territory that can be qualified locally points to the presence of a cultural process that plays an important role in the creation of resources that are essential to the efficient operation of such a system. Drawing on several examples of sports and tourist sites in the French Alps, we show how this localised cultural system is built up and how it takes shape. The study of the forms of development set up by the different service providers and of the sports culture of the tourists provides valuable insights into the make-up and practical organisation of these cultural resources in an outdoor recreational site.

 

Dahlström, Margareta1 and Hermelin, Brita2 (Session 2.14)
1Nordregio, Nordic Centre for Spatial Development, Box 1658, SE-111 86 Stockholm, Sweden, 2Department of Human Geography, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden

Email: margareta.dahlstrom@nordregio.se
Creative industries, spatiality and flexibility—the example of film production

At the beginning of the 1990s, film production in Sweden was centralised in the capital city of Stockholm. Fifteen years later, the geography of film production has decentralised to include three regional film production centres far from the capital. The aim of this paper is to understand this decentralised location, focusing on the aspects of flexible film work and film workers. Labour and work practice flexibility create conceptual lenses through which the analysis is developed. The major empirical data is a survey of film workers with 1,104 respondents. Different structures of the film industry are discussed. The results show that the geography of film workers diverges from the geography of film work, reflecting spatial mobility among film workers. Multiscalar relations in film work and film projects appear to be the organisational norm within film production.

 

Daniels, P. W.1 and Qiu, Y.2 (Session 4.18)

1Services and Enterprise Research Unit, School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK, 2Trade Efficiency and Facilitation Section, Trade and Investment Division,

United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, Bangkok 10200, Thailand

Email: p.w.daniels@bham.ac.uk

State intervention and the realignment of comparative advantage in a global environment: the case of the services sector in China

The accession of China into the WTO in 2001 further consolidated recognition by national policy makers that the services sector has a key part to play in the transition from a centrally-planned to a market economy supported by a rapidly changing domestic market and greater integration with international markets. Advanced (producer) services as sources of the knowledge and expertise that will support sectors across the Chinese economy in their efforts to enhance their comparative and competitive advantages are crucial agents in this process. This has been fully recognized in the Chinese Eleventh Five Year Plan (2006-2010). This paper explores recent initiatives undertaken by policy makers at central and local levels to accelerate the development of producer services in ways that will enhance the competitiveness of client firms as well as China’s services sector. The prospects for success as well as the limitations of these state-driven initiatives are also analyzed.

 

Dannenberg, Peter (Session 4.4)
Humboldt-UniversitŠt zu Berlin, Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche FakultŠt II, Geographisches Institut, Abteilung Humangeographie, Wirtschaftsgeographie, Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin, Germany

Email: dannenberg@geo.hu-berlin.de
Cluster in agrarian value chains in Germany and Poland
The analysis of spatial concentrations of manufacturing industries and the development of cluster models is a major research area of Economic Geography. But up to now, there are hardly any studies on the development of cluster-like structures of agriculture in rural areas. The presentation shows the results on an analysis on the questions:

Š                To what extent cluster-like structures can be found in rural areas, which linkages?

Š                Which linkages are important elements of cluster formation?

Š                Do the included firms have a better position in competition compared to other firms?

 

Das, Diganta Kumar (Session 4.15)

Dept. of Geography, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Block AS-2, 1 Arts Link, #04-01 National University of Singapore, Singapore 117570

Email: dkd@nus.edu.sg

The making of Hi-Tech enclaves and the politics of social exclusions: a case of Cyberabad (Hyderabad, India)

Advances in information technology have led to the restructuring of cities. City or city-regions have become the core of the global economy in this new informational mode of development. The contemporary literatures on high-technology firms, new industrial spaces, information parks etc. indicates that such high-tech spaces are more ‘connected’ to the global economy than to the regional or local economy. Cyberabad, a 52 sq. km ‘hi-tech’ enclave within Hyderabad, provides an important context to examine the growing social polarization, splintering of urban spaces and emerging disparities at different scales. This hi-tech enclave has been carved out of 17 villages situated within the Hyderabad Urban Agglomeration boundary (HUA). The paper intends to examine the role of state in the making of Cyberabad and in the resultant socio-spatial and economic changes. The focus is on two villages, Gopanpally and Nanakramguda, within the enclave and the ensuing imperative problem of social exclusion and marginalization.

 

Davies, Tamsin (Session 1.5)
Institute of Geography and Earth Sciences, University of Wales Aberystwyth, Penglais Campus, Aberystwyth, SY23 3DB, UK.

Email: ted@aber.ac.uk

Developing innovation in a peripheral region: university – industry links in Wales
Wales is a peripheral region of the UK that has undergone substantial deindustrialisation. Regional policy has since sought to develop Wales as a knowledge economy based on innovative high-technology industry. The untapped knowledge from its universities has been identified as important to such development. However, exploiting academic knowledge for the purposes of innovation is challenging in a region with a historical dependence on the production of staples and low-skilled manufacturing, and little history of R&D. This paper explores the significance of knowledge transfer, translation and transformation between universities and industry in enabling learning and innovation in the region.

 

Delaney, James M. (Session 2.11)

Department of Geography, 100 St. St. George Street, University of

Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3G3, Canada

Email: j.delaney@utoronto.ca

Consumption spaces and the politics of placemaking: managing commercial change on two Toronto commercial strips

In this paper, I examine the process of commercial change and redevelopment on two Toronto commercial strips. Drawing on the ‘new retail geography’ and its attention to how cultural and institutional factors shape spaces and places of consumption, I examine the process of commercial retail change at two scales of analysis: first, the individual store, and second, the Business Improvement Area (BIA). BIAs offer an interesting example of associational action that attempts to drive innovation and growth through place-making. They thrive in gentrified environments that appeal to middle-class consumers through a focus on developing distinct consumption experiences and distinct places for consumption. I shall argue that this process of place-making is driven in large part by a relatively new breed of entrepreneur, driving changes in both the structure of retail and the built environment of commercial strips. BIAs play an important role in this process through promoting the interests of change while excluding many other stakeholders.

 


Diniz, Clélio Campolina and Campolina, Bernando (Session 4.7)

Rua Felipe dos Santos, 344 apto. 01 – ZIP CODE 30.180.160. Belo Horizonte, Brazil; Email: camp@cedeplar.ufmg.br

The metropolitan region of Sčo Paulo: industrial restructruing and new functions

The aim of the paper is to analyze the economic and industrial restructuring of the Metropolitan Region of Sčo Paulo (MRSP) and its relative importance in the national and international contexts. We discuss its economic and demographic growth in the last decades, the nature of its economic crises and, its productive and industrial restructuring. Then, we analyze the integration of the metropolitan area Sčo Paulo and four neighbors urban industrial areas (Campinas, Sčo José dos Campos, Sorocaba and Santos) and the constitution of a City-Region and a pole of more knowledge intensive activities in Brazil.

 

Do, Thi Minh Duc (Session 2.3)

Faculty of Geography, Hanoi National University of Education, 136 Xuan Thuy Road, Cau Giay, Hanoi, Vietnam; Email: dothiminhduc@gmail.com

An analysis of poverty alleviation in fishing communities in Van Don district, Quang Ninh province, Vietnam

Van Don Island is the largest one in the Vietnamese Tonkin Gulf. Together with 600 surrounding smaller islands, it makes up the Van Don District. About 30 percent of total households there are engaged in fisheries. The findings of this study came out from a household survey in two communes of Ha Long and Thang Loi. Associations between poverty alleviation and changes in capture, aquaculture and small trades were identified; feasible options for alternative livelihood and diversification of income sources were proposed to help local fishing communities to escape from poverty and to gain sustainable development.

 

Dombroski, Kelly (Session 1.14)

Department of Human Geography Department, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University, ACT 0200 Australia; Email: kellydombroski@gmail.com

Mothers in a diverse economy: development agencies and mothers’ economic activities in Qinghai

Through programmes that emphasise income generation activities, development agencies in Qinghai continue to promote a rather narrow view of the economy that fails to include much of the household-provisioning work and mothering activities women are engaged in. I argue that development practitioners could open up their understanding of the ‘economy’ to include a diversity of provisioning activities, transactions, labour and enterprise, and thus recognise and support the important economic activities that mothers are already engaged in. I present an initial sketch map of the diverse economic activities of Hui Muslim Chinese mothers as a starting point for appropriate community-building development.

 

Dong, Lijing1 and Zhang, Pingyu2 (Session 4.5)

1College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024, China, 2Institute of Northeast Geography and Agricultural Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, China, 130012; Email: ljdong1978@gmail.com

Industrial transformation and employment change of old industrial city: the case of Shenyang, China

An important issue affecting state security and economic prosperity is industrial transformation of the old industrial city in China's regional economy, yet it still remains unresolved. Here we investigated the changes in the interaction of industrial transformation and employment in Shenyang. As a typical old industrial city in China, Shenyang's industrial transformation is a representative one. This paper explores the industrial transformation of Shenyang from the perspective of industrial upgrading, industrial replacement and industrial convergence. Then, it analyses employment effects on industrial transformation, which include the change of employment structures, institutions and cultures. Eventually, it summarizes the characteristics of industrial transformation and employment change in the old industrial city and discusses the countermeasures of employment enhancement in Shenyang.

 

dos Santos, Rogerio (Session 1.7)
Cornell University, 313 N Geneva St, Apt 1 Ithaca NY 14850 USA

Email: ra239@cornell.edu

Entrepreneurship, innovation and regional development in Sao Paulo: from postindustrial illusions to a new research and policy agenda

This paper will provide a theoretical and empirical alternative to the so-called global cities literature, which argues that the socio-economic organization of the global economy tends to transform the productive role of cities and metropolitan regions into spaces of global-oriented tertiary activities. In this sense, it is argued that there has been a transition from manufacturing to services in Sao Paulo metropolitan region. Alternatively, I hypothesize that a ‘new’ economy based on dense networks between manufacturing and services has emerged, thus reinforcing manufacturing agglomeration around the city of Sao Paulo. These patterns emphasize the role of the city as a center of innovation and entrepreneurship in manufacturing as well as services. Finally, I analyze the implication of these processes for development policies in Brazil.

 


Dunford, Michael (Session 1.2)

School of Social Sciences and Cultural Studies, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9SH, England; Email: m.f.dunford@sussex.ac.uk

After the Three Italies

The aim of this paper is threefold. The first is to present a re-interpretation of trends in development and inequality associated with the evolution of the Italian economy and its constituent regions particularly in the last 30 years. At the centre of this re-interpretation is a critique of analyses of the Three Italies rooted in the new regionalism with their emphases on area-centred concepts and the weight attached to cultural and institutional considerations. Considerable importance is attached to the capacity of any reinterpretation to permit an understanding of the Italian economy's loss of economic momentum in the context of contemporary financialization and globalization tendencies. The second is to identify methodologies that permit the integration of aggregate and firm-centred case-study research and the simultaneous consideration of meso-economic trends and their micro-foundations of regional change The third is to re-emphasise the importance of theories of the uneven development of contemporary capitalism rooted in the political economy and regulation theoretic traditions for any understanding of the changing economic geography of contemporary capitalism.

 

Edgington, David1, Lee, Lydia2 and Hayter, Roger2 (Session 4.8)

1 Department of Geography, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada V6T 122; 2Department of Geography, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver BC, Canada; Email: edington@geog.ubc

Taiwan’s latecomer firms and the Asian division of labour in the electronics industry.

This paper focuses on the role of Taiwan’s so-called ‘latecomer firms’ in Asia’s evolving intra-regional division of labour within the electronics industry. Latecomer firms are innovative, dynamic, large and indigenous influences on Asian economic development but their impacts on technology development and the division of labour are under-appreciated. Conceptually we connect latecomer firms with the triad business segmentation model and technology learning as summarized by reverse product cycle dynamics. Empirically, the study focuses on the evolutionary dynamics of a latecomer case study, the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company to reveal the extent to which Taiwan has developed internationally competitive technological capabilities.

 


Eich-Born, Marion (Session 4.14)
Geographisches Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Löbdergraben 32, 07743 Jena, Germany

Email: marion.eich-born@uni-jena.de

The Chinese shipbuilding challenge: global shifts in production and trade

Over the past 50 years we can observe a dramatic global shift in shipbuilding activities rather than in shipping: Great Britain losing ground to Continental Europe, from there to Japan, to South Korea and most recently to China. The presentation will draw a global map of production and trade, outlining the differentials within and between the major regions concerning competitive strategies. Recent developments in China and their possible effects on the dominant shipbuilding regions will be at the center of attention.

 

Elsner, James and Jagger, Thomas (Session 1.11)

Department of Geography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA; Email: jelsner@fsu.edu

Forecasting insured hurricane losses
Coastal hurricanes generate huge financial losses within the insurance industry. The relative infrequency of severe coastal hurricanes implies that empirical probability estimates of the next big loss will be unreliable. Hurricane climatologists have recently developed statistical models to forecast the level of coastal hurricane activity from climate conditions prior to the season. Motivated by the usefulness of such models, here we analyze and model a catalogue of normalized insured losses caused by hurricanes affecting the United States. The catalogue of losses dates back through the 20th century. The purpose is to develop a preseason forecast tool that can be used for insurance applications. Although wind speed is directly related to damage potential, the amount of damage depends on both storm intensity and storm size. As anticipated, we find climate conditions prior to the hurricane season provide information about the likelihood of insured hurricane losses. The models exploit this information to predict the distribution of likely annual losses and the distribution of a worst case catastrophic loss aggregated over the entire U.S. coast.

 

Enrique Pino (Session 4.20)

Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Monrovia 1202, PH-4, Portales Sur, CP. 03300, Mexico City; Email: pinohen@hotmail.com

Trade and investments between China and South Korea. Economical integration by region and geopolitics reconfiguration in Asia-Pacific

I research the tendencies of trade and investments between the Peoples’ Republic of China and South Korea. The flow of merchandises and capital comprise a chief dimension of economic integration in Asia-Pacific, next to a geopolitical reconfiguration. Both processes define the stage of the economic relationships between China and Korea. The achievements in this matter are the result of a new strategy in foreign politics of the Chinese authorities (cooperation and multilateralism). The dynamics of trade and investments of the last ten years has made China the second largest business partner of Korea. Also, it has become a chief money-market for Korean investment, as a foreign one. Korea is an expansive market of a high income to the Chinese exportations and therefore, a source of capital. For Latin America, specifically for Mexico, the goal is to take part and receive benefits from this region’s boom that shows the biggest dynamism in growth, investments and consumption.

 

Essex, Jamey (Sesion 2.6)

Department of Political Science, University of Windsor Chrysler Hall North, 401 Sunset Ave., Windsor ON N9B 3P4, Canada

Email: jessex@uwindsor.ca

Deservedness, development, and the state in USAID’s foreign assistance framework
US development policy and foreign assistance allocation are undergoing profound changes, central to which is a new framework for foreign aid built around a taxonomy of developing states that reflects a neoliberal understanding of deservedness in aid allocation. The US Agency for International Development (USAID) has played an important role in this framework’s evolution, and this paper investigates the agency’s relationship with the new framework. I argue that current shifts in US development policy, especially those emphasizing ‘transformational development’ abroad and centralization over strategic decision-making domestically, reflect both continuity and change in the geographic understandings and structures underlying USAID’s work.

Essletzbichler, Jurgen and Kadokawa, Kazuo (Session 2.17)

Department of Geography, University College London, 26 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AP, UK; Email: j.essletzbichler@geog.ucl.ac.uk

Regional technology evolution in Japanese manufacturing

The Japanese manufacturing sector went through several waves of restructuring to maintain its international competitiveness. While the macroeconomic changes are well understood, the impact on regions has been neglected. This paper examines the impact of the restructuring process on regional trajectories of technological change since the 1980s and whether regions are able to maintain their relative technological positions or whether technological convergence occurred. Changes in regional variation in technology levels will be decomposed into the effects of industry-mix and technological catch-up.

 

Fan, Peilei (Session 1.9)

Michigan State University, School of Planning, Design & Construction, Urban & Regional Planning Program , 215 UPLA Building, East Lansing, MI 48824-1221, USA; Email: fanpeile@msu.edu

Staged catching-up theory and its spatial manifestation: development of domestic ICT firms in China

This paper presents a staged catching-up theory that analyzes the catching up process of domestic firms in late industrializing countries when there is the presence of multinational corporations (MNCs). I describe this process through a sequence of four characteristic stages. At each stage, I analyze the characteristics of the market, the behavior of domestic firms, the role of the government, and the behavior of MNCs, and its spatial manifestation. This framework incorporates insights from Schumpeterian growth dynamics, staged theory, the product-cycle theory, and the profit-cycle theory and is testified by the development of the domestic telecom-equipment and PC manufacturers in China.

 

Faulconbridge, James (Session 1.5)
Department of Geography, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4YW, UK; Email: j.faulconbridge@lancaster.ac.uk

Ecologies of knowledge in global architectural firms

There has long been interest in the geography of architecture, often focusing upon built forms and their socially constructed meanings. There has been less interest, however, in the architects designing these contemporary urban forms and their ecologies of knowledge that inform the design process. In this paper I attempt to unpack the geographies of the practices, social networks and technologies that makeup the knowledge ecologies of architects in leading global firms. It is argued that understanding the way these are (re)produced can inform a number of contemporary debates about the spatiality of neoliberal knowledges and the characteristics of urban environments.

 

Fauziah, Che Leh (Session 4.12)
Geography Department, University Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI), 35900, Tanjong Malim Perak, Malaysia; Email: fauzia@upsi.edu.my

Manufacturing-producer services relationship: a case study of electric and electronic firms in Penang industrial areas
Economic globalisation has exposed the electric and electronic industrial sector to competition, which is intense and global in character. This situation subsequently influences the capability of firms to plan production based on a new perspective. Affected firms thus implement several strategies to upgrade their competitiveness at the global scale through product upgrading; and this is related to the capacity arising from the producer services sector. Following from the above, this paper aims to examine to what extent industrial upgrading in the manufacturing sector is possible via the integration of the capacity arising from local producer services component, which is in line with the ‘Manufacturing Plus Plus’ strategy of the IMP2. Using research methods such as face-to-face interviews and questionnaire surveies, and focussing on R&D and IT, this research on the electric and electronic firms in industrial areas in Penang (30 firms) indicates that industrial upgrading efforts in the manufacturing sector could be achieved through the integration of advanced producer services components in the production process. In this respect, this research contributes to current knowledge and understanding (from the perspective of theory and practice) on the producer services─manufacturing sector relationship.

 

Felsenstein, Daniel (Session 4.10)
Department of Geography, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Mount Scopus, Jerusalem 91905 Israel; Email: msdfels@mscc.huji.ac.il

Job mobility and local economic development

Economic and urban geographers have long used the 'chain' metaphor to conceptualize the operation of key parts of the economy. Mobility in the housing, labor and production markets have all been explained as subject to predictable linear processes whereby a change in one part of the system elicits responses in other parts. This paper presents an approach to using the chain construct to understanding labor mobility in local economies. In addition, the chain approach explicitly considers the welfare and distributional labor market issues in local economic development. These are often acknowledged but seldom estimated. The paper presents an example of the approach relating to the establishment of a large auto plant in a major Midwestern city in the US. The mechanism of job mobility is identified and traced through local labor markets vacancies. Efficiency and distributional gains to workers are estimated with special emphasis based on Rawlsian-type effects through the opening up of labor market chains.

 

FlŅysand, Arnt1 and Jakobsen, Stig-Erik2 (Session 2.4)
1Department of Geography, University of Bergen, Fosswinckelsgt 6, N-5020 Bergen, Norway, 2Institute for Research in Economics and Business Administration, Breiviksveien 40, N-5045 BERGEN, Norway

Email: arnt.floysand@geog.uib.no

Theory of innovation: A multi-level gaze from non-metropolitan Norway
Much of the existing innovation literature are based on empirical evidence from metropolitan areas and urban agglomerations, and assume a geographical co-location of a comprehensive business milieu and an advanced knowledge infrastructure. In the proposed project we will develop new concepts that are able to capture innovation processes that take place in the shadow of international metropolitans. By analysing innovation practice among firms within local industrial milieus in non-metropolitan areas in Norway our study confront the existing literature. First, we will introduce the resource-based view (RBV) approach to uncover the actually innovation practice of firms. In the current research on innovation there is a lack of a deeper understanding of the construction, maintenance and development of the capabilities of firms. Secondly, we will apply a multi-level methodology. Within existing innovation research there is an emphasis on institutional and knowledge proximity, and a tendency to frame regional development in terms of lines and boundaries. We view economic activity in regions as structured by flows of people, images, information and capital, and through the application of the concept of social field we will capture the multi-level character of economic practice. Our theoretical approach will be informed by case studies of industrial milieus in non-metropolitan Norway.

 

Fold, Niels and Moller-Jensen, Lasse (Session 2.16)

Department of Geography and Geology, University of Copenhagen, Oster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 K, Denmark; Email: nf@geogr.ku.dk

New patterns of food trade in Asia Pacific: the role of China

Previous studies on food trade in the Asia Pacific have focused on the so-called East Asian food import complex within the theoretical framework of food regimes. Particular attention has been paid to major ‘iconic’ components of the complex, for instance the regionally integrated production and processing of beef. This paper discusses the emergence of new patterns of food trade in Asia Pacific since 1990 by examining the major intra-regional export flows of food with respect to trend, stability, market concentration and driving factors. We argue that trade flows in fresh as well as processed seafood and produce (fruits and vegetables) now constitute the dynamic element in Pacific Asia’s food trade, not least because of the increasing importance of exports from China since the turn of the century.

Fritsch, Michael and Slavtchev, Viktor (Session 2.23)

Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Carl-Zeiss-Str. 3, D-07743 Jena, Germany

Email: m.fritsch@uni-jena.de

What determines the efficiency of regional innovation systems?
We assess the efficiency of regional innovation systems (RIS) in Germany by means of a knowledge production function. Spillovers within the private sector as well as from universities and other public research institutions have a positive effect on the efficiency of private sector R&D. It is not the mere presence and size of public research institutions, but rather the intensity of interactions between private and public sector R&D that leads to high RIS efficiency. The relationship between the diversity of a regions’ industry structure and the efficiency of its innovation system is inversely u-shaped.

 

Fromhold-Eisebith, Martina (Session 4.3)

Department of Geography, RWTH Aachen University, Templergraben 55, D-52056 Aachen, Germany
Email: m.fromhold-eisebith@geo.rwth-aachen.de

Reconceptualizing interdependencies of industrial globalization and regional development – the ‘industrial transition’ approach

Recently, patterns of internationalized production and global-local dynamics have become increasingly complex, deviating from conventional explanatory frameworks (e.g. ‘new international division of labour’, regulation theory and post-fordism). While the ‘global production networks’ approach of the Manchester School provides a valuable new guideline for addressing various interdependent processes across spatial scales, it underemphasizes regional dynamics, which deserve to become subject to renewed conceptual considerations in their own right. Introducing the notion of ‘industrial transition’, the presentation highlights new facets of the development of internationally integrated industrial spaces in highly developed countries and aims at conceptualizing emergent systemic, versatile and volatile qualities.

 

Fuchs, Martina (Session 2.20)

Department of Economic and Social Geography, at the University of Cologne, Albertus-Magnus-Platz, 50923 Cologne, Germany
Email: fuchs@wiso.uni-koeln.de

Junctions towards more competencies in subsidiaries of international companies

The paper discusses the development of compe­tencies on the plant level as an important driving force for regional change, especially in peripheries of large market regions. By means of a critical reception of the evolutionary view and of empirical insights, the contribution studies ‘junctions’ towards pathways with new competencies in the subsidiaries. The paper concentrates on the situation of change. It does not focus on the history of long-term evolution, but the specific state of affairs when the subsidiary leaves the previous path and steps onto a new path.

 


Fuhrer, Bernhard (Session 2.12)

Hallerstrasse 28, 3012 Bern, Switzerland; Email: fuhrer@giub.unibe.ch

The limits of copying successful institutional settings – the (failed) French case of emulating the U.S. biotechnology regime

In the mid 1990s, the largely U.S. - led commercial success of biotechnology led the French government to launch the Genopole Biotech Initiative. Its declared aim was the commercialization of the existing science base in a bid to bolster national competitiveness. Thus the Genopole Biotech Initiative bound public research, technology transfer agencies and private players together in a geographically and scientifically focused greenfield campus in Evry, 20 miles south of Paris. The paper examines this French Initiative in the perspective of institutional and technological change (Nelson 2005, Thelen 2005) and the literature on 'varieties of capitalism' (Hall 2007). The main question is how the largely U.S.-inspired best-practice policy rhymes with the existing French institutional setup. The analysis shows that the institutional mismatch between the U.S. and France leads to a costly process of institutional emulation where the Genopole initiative functions as a coordination agency mimicking the targeted institutional environment straddled on pre-existing structures. While this process of institutional emulation is found to be costly and time-consuming it is nevertheless theorized as one possible pathway of institutional change.

 

Gál, Zoltán (Session 1.1)

Centre for Regional Studies of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, PÉCS Papnövelde u. 22. 7621, Hungary; Email: galz@rkk.hu
‘Future Bangalores?’: role of offshoring in the financial centre formation in the major Central Eastern European cities
Today, offshoring, in combination with the BPO activities, is one of the key drivers of regional corporate concentrations, happening even increasingly in financial services. Offshoring means the relocation of certain financial activities from one site to another, which requires the geographical reorganization of their service value chains by choosing among a number of locations. Offshore locations need to differentiate themselves more smartly in order to make their location more competitive. My paper deals with the participation & performance of the 3 major CEE cities (Warsaw, Budapest & Prague) in the world-wide offshoring & BPO activities in financial services. While lower cost is still the primary driver of many offshoring location strategies, other factors clearly need to be considered in deciding the most suitable location (considering the possible second tier city locations too) and the reorganization of companies’ value chain. Collecting the broader sets of factors (drivers) aggregating from different indicators (financial market indicators, costs, HR, Business Environment, Market Potential, Infrastructure, Real Estate) I would like to set an alternative model to cost saving objectives, positioning (processing indicators) the CEE cities in comparison with the 'rising stars' of South and South East Asia.

 

Ganzey, Sergey (Session 1.16)

Radio Str., Bld. 7, Pacific Institute of Geography, Far Eastern Branch, RAS, 690041, Vladivostok, Russia; Email: ganzei@tig.dvo.ru

Problems of sustainable development of Northeast China and the Russian Far East transboundary territories

Significant distinctions are observed from the beginning of 1990 in economic development of frontier territories of Northeast China and the Southern Russian Far East. The fast growth of the Chinese economy has caused the additional needs covered by natural resources in frontier areas of the Russian Far East. It concerns wood, fuel and energy resources. Statistical data connecting with frontier economic cooperation and the map of types of modern economic use in the Amur River Basin are analyzed. The prospects of sustainable development on the basis of landscape planning for transboundary territories are offered.

 

Gao, Boyang and Liu, Weidong (Session 2.14)

Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research (IGSNRR), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing, 100101, China, Datun Road, Anwai, Chaoyang District, Beijing, China

Email: gaoboyang06@mails.gucas.ac.cn

Factors affecting recent spatial changes of the electrical household appliance industry in China: a case of color TV manufacturing

Industrial location is a result of the interactions between economic, social and physical factors. Since the 1990s, factors affecting industrial spatial distribution in China have changed a lot, with the decreasing role of traditional factors like natural resources and transportation and an increase of the role of a number of new factors, such as foreign direct investment (FDI), industrial cluster, and development of innovation networks. As such, manufacturing activities have experienced turbulent spatial changes in recent years. This paper, taking color-TV manufacturing as an example, tries to explore the changing factors affecting the recent spatial changes of the electronic household appliance industry in China. During the recent transition from the central planning economy to a market economy and from a closed economy to one integrated more and more into the global economy, the affecting factors have changed from government direction and participation to corporate strategies to cope with intensified market competition and to FDI of multinationals. The paper offers a case to understand the overall industrial spatial changes in China.

 

Gao, Genghe and Li, Xiaojian (Session 4.21)
Key Research Institute of Yellow River Civilization and Sustainable Development, Henan University; College of Environment and Planning, Henan University, Kaifeng 475001 China

Email: gaogenghe@yahoo.com.cn

The study on RMW cluster in the Central China – in the case of three different types of villages in Henan province

The study on location choosing of rural migrant workers (RMW) is the basis for exploring the space laws of RMW flows. In analyzing three different types of villages, this paper found that employment location of RMW is obviously clustering in some places. At the village scale, few locations have the majority of RMW, which depends on their social capital. The guan-xi network, based on traditional family values and regional beliefs plays, an important role in the formation of RMW cluster, and the seed RMW or potential RMW results in the formation and diffusion of the cluster in the game dependent on relational intensity.

 

Gertler, Meric S. (Session 1.5)

Munk Centre for International Studies, University of Toronto, 1 Devonshire Place, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3K7, Canada

Email: meric.gertler@utoronto.ca

Buzz without being there? Communities of practice in context

A core idea emerging from the recent geographical literature on communities of practice is the insight that geographical proximity should not be confused with relational proximity. This means that the former need not imply the latter. Equally if not more intriguing for economic geographers, it also presents the possibility that relational proximity can be achieved at a distance. While this argument makes sense conceptually, its limits – both theoretical and empirical – have not yet been fully explored. Under what conditions should we expect relational proximity to be achieved effectively at a distance? In this paper, I suggest that the evidence accumulated thus far is still underdeveloped, drawing on a small sample of sectors and empirical settings. It is also somewhat undertheorized, lacking any systematic attempt to identify critical determinants of relational proximity. I then review recent findings from a number of case studies in which distributed teams participating in joint problem-solving projects have attempted to engage in long-distance learning and knowledge translation, with varying degrees of success. Deterrents to effective distanciated learning are both logistical and institutional in nature. The frictional effects of distance are shown to depend to some extent on the types of knowledge base supporting innovation in each case. I argue that it is through this kind of analysis that we might begin to develop more compelling answers to questions like: under what circumstances will relational proximity be stronger or weaker? What are the conditions that facilitate long-distance circulation of knowledge, or its joint production by distanciated actors?

 

Gibson, Katherine (Session 1.14)

Department of Human Geography, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, The Australian National University

Email: katherine.gibson@anu.edu.au

The ‘moral economy’ meets ‘diverse economies’: rethinking rural transformation and local development in the Philippines

How we describe and explain rural change shapes local imaginaries and development pathways. The dynamics of mechanization, monetization, commoditization, proletarianization and out-migration are seen to have accomplished the ‘great transformation’ from moral/non-capitalist to rational/capitalist economies in much of Asia. In this paper I revisit calls made more than a decade ago to rethink the problematic metaphors of rural identity and transformation employed in the literature on agrarian transition. With reference to the Philippines I suggest that an alternative geography of possibility emerges if we attend to the diverse economies in place and theorize heterogeneous, non-deterministic, dynamics of change.

 

Glasmeier, Amy (Session 2.3)

Department of Geography, 304 Walker Building, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 USA; Email: akg1@ems.psu.edu
The creative class meets the poor: segregated spaces or urban geographies of inclusion?

A substantial literature exists recounting the spatial segregation of the poor and minorities. Traditionally, poor and non-white individuals and families have occupied spaces distance from whites and persons of high income. An emergent literature suggests individuals of high skill and diverse immigrant status are breaking down barriers leading to spatial inclusion of traditionally excluded groups. Examining two spatial scales and two time periods, counties and census tracts for 1990 and 2000, we explore the propensities of co-location of members of society that heretofore have been marked by spatial separation. After exploring aggregate patterns, using two case study locations Austin, Texas and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania we look closely at how landmarks and established land uses affect the propensity of individuals of high skill to ‘co-locate’ thereby helping to diminish long standing patterns of spatial segregation.

 


Glassman, Jim1 and Park, Bae-Gyoon2 (Session 1.3)

1Department of Geography, University of British Columbia, 217 – 1984 West Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z2 Canada, 2Dept. of Geography Education, Seoul National University San 56-1 Sillim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-748, South Korea; Email: glassman@geog.ubc.ca

Failed internationalism and social movement decline: the cases of South Korea and Thailand

In the late 1980s and into the 1990s, South Korean social movements converted a former military dictatorship into a more democratic regime, while raising hopes for yet more improvements in the position of Korean workers and farmers. In the 1990s, Thai social movements also cast aside a military dictatorship and opened a period where popular movements seemed poised to make yet greater gains. Yet as of 2007 it is apparent that social movements in both South Korea and Thailand have faced increased difficulties and have seen a number of significant setbacks. In this paper we analyze what we take to be one of the reasons for these setbacks: the failures of social movements in each of these countries to more successfully internationalize their efforts. Failed internationalism is far from the only significant factor in this social movement decline, and it has not necessarily occurred in precisely the same way in South Korean and Thai cases. We show, however, that by analyzing similarities and differences in the patterns of social movement decline between South Korea and Thailand one can discern some common conundrums faced by social movements in an era of neo-liberalism and neo-conservatism.

 

Gong, Hongmian1 and Yang, Fan2 (Session 4.10)

1Department of Geography, Hunter College of the City University of New York, 695 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10021, USA; 2The University of Hong Kong; Email: gong@hunter.cuny.edu

Labor transition in Chinese urban services sector

This study examines the labor transition from tertiary to quaternary and quinary services in Chinese cities and investigates the forces driving the shift. It demonstrates that the transition since the late 1990s has occurred in a manner similar to that in Western countries, but much of the services employment is still accounted for by low-order tertiary activities. A quantitative analysis of a panel of 227 cities from 1998 to 2002 reveals that the transition is influenced by such factors as increase in per capita GDP, the size of the city, the level of urbanization, and local institutional arrangement.

 


Gower, Jeffery L. (Session 4.14)

University at Buffalo, Dept. of Geography, 105 Wilkeson Quad, Buffalo, NY 14261, USA; Email: jgower@buffalo.edu

The politics of rice: the KORUS FTA and a changing U.S. Congress

As political party power shifted in the U.S. Congress to the Democratic Party following the 2006 elections, a greater degree of protectionist rhetoric has been inserted into the Korea-United States Free Trade Agreement (KORUS FTA) negotiations. Korean rice farmers protested in Seoul recently over these current negotiations which they deem unsatisfactory. South Korea desires to protect its highly-subsidized domestic rice market from foreign competition. This paper focuses on the recent changing events affecting the KORUS FTA, with an emphasis on the rice market negotiations.

 

Graham, Mark (Session 2.14)

University of Kentucky, 4809 Cypress St.; Pittsburgh, PA 15224; USA

Email: mark.graham@uky.edu

Hybrid space, technology, and development discourse in the Thai silk industry

The Internet is often touted as a panacea for perceived deficiencies in economic development. Its space-transcending abilities, which can instantly connect producers with consumers, have the potential to cut out intermediaries and to redistribute economic surplus in a more equitable manner. This paper asks whether the promises of the Internet are being realized in the context of development programs in the Thai silk industry. Using interviews and surveys with producers and sellers of silk in the Isaan region of Thailand, this paper examines: the characteristics of people and firms using the Internet in the Thai silk industry, the effects that the Internet is having on the organization of silk commodity chains, and the economic beneficiaries of such changes.

 

Gray, Mia1 and Burchell, Brendan2 (Session 1.15)

1 Dept of Geography, Univ of Cambridge, Downing Place, Cambridge CB2 3EN England, 2Cambridge University, Dept of Social and Political Science; Email: pmg27@cam.ac.uk

Spaces of learning: proximities and knowledge flows

Studies of innovation and knowledge diffusion in economic geography have traditionally emphasised the importance of spatial proximity to furthering the diffusion of tacit knowledge. Project-based organisational forms, in particular, are thought to require proximity, as workers’ competencies are combined for only limited periods in order to deal with increasing levels of complexity. However, more recent literature is challenging the link between non-codified knowledge flows and proximity. Furthermore, the emphasis on proximity is difficult to reconcile with the growth of many firms’ globalised research functions. As part of this we explore the mechanisms involved in the creation and maintenance of relational forms of proximity between workers in cross-site projects around the world. This paper explores these themes by analysing one company’s global R&D efforts; that is the ways in which the firm structures work practices and collective learning in cross-site teams located in different sites, the firm’s ability to promote group cohesion, and, conversely, we analyse how localised teams, working on cross-site projects affect the structure of the organisation and its approach to innovation.

 

Greenaway, Alison (Session 1.16)

School of Geography Geology and Environmental Sciences, University of Auckland, Aotearoa New Zealand and Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research, Private Bag 92170, Auckland, New Zealand

Email: greenawaya@landcareresearch.co.nz

Sustainable development trajectories: how stories from Asia shape environmental management in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Not limited to New Zealand, yet uniquely shaped in NZ, are political projects utilising discourses and practices of sustainable development, the knowledge economy, and deliberative democracy. This paper presents ideas being developed in my PhD research exploring the performance of knowledge through spaces of collaborative learning in environmental management. In the context of this Economic Geography conference in Beijing I pay particular attention to trajectories of sustainable development discourses. For example, are the practices of participatory evaluation and monitoring I am involved with informed by or related to the struggles for ‘stories not indicators’ voiced by women in South Asian NGO’s?

 

Gress, Douglas (Session 4.9)

Ewha Womans University, 405-15 SeoGyo-Dong (4th Floor) Mapo-Gu Seoul, Korea 121-840; Email: Douglas_gress@hotmail.com

Firm networks and Korean subsidiaries in the United States

This paper examines the role of intra, inter and extra-firm networks in influencing the location and investment of Korean firms and their subsidiaries in the United States (US). Based on a survey of Korean subsidiaries in the US in 2004, this paper finds that inter-firm relations with customers and suppliers, as well as intra-firm relations in the form of parent firms’ knowledge of the US play an important role in locational decision. Korean subsidiaries’ relationships with US places are strongly influenced by home-based practices that favor hierarchical intra-firm organization and embedded socio-political extra-firm relationships that emphasize blood, school and regional ties. Location in US industrial clusters does not increase Korean subsidiaries’ level of autonomy from parent firm’s control that could help facilitate the sourcing of local knowledge and resources. Only improved intra-firm network positionality positively contributes to increased subsidiary autonomy. Overall, the findings indicate that while inter-firm relations may be important in locational selection among Korean firms, network norms are largely maintained through intra-firm and, to a lesser extent, extra-firm relations.

 

Grote, Michael1, Umber, Marc1 and Frey, Rainer2 (Session 1.1)

1Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, Postfach 11 19 32, 60054 Frankfurt am Main, Germany, 2Deutsche Bundesbank, Economics Department. Wilhelm-Epstein-Straße 14, D-60431 Frankfurt am Main

Email: grote@finance.uni-frankfurt.de

How integrated is the internal market?: the role of distance in M&A-transactions in Europe

This paper examines spatial aspects of intra-European mergers and acquisitions transactions. We show that most acquirers still have a strong and consistent preference for domestic target companies. This ‘home bias’ has only gradually eroded over time. Domestic transactions still also yield better returns for acquirers’ shareholders around the announcement of the deal. But companies do prefer spatially proximate targets irrespectively of the presence of a border (see Grote and Umber 2006), so it is not clear whether the finding of a home bias means that the European market is not integrated enough. Therefore, we measure the home bias against benchmark portfolios of hypothetical targets for each deal and estimate – with respect to M&A transactions – how ‘thick’ borders are in today’s Europe.

 

Gu, Chaolin1, Wu, Fulong and Guo, Chen2 (Session 2.3)
1School of Architecture, Dept. of Urban Planning, Tsinghua University, China; 2Pennsylvania State University, 304 Walker, University Park, PA 16802, USA; Email: gucl@tsinghua.edu.cn

New urban poverty in Chinese transitional economies

Previous studies of poverty under Chinese state socialism have emphasized on rural areas. This article stresses the new urban poverty under political transition and economic transformation. In China, the transitional systems, economic reconstructions and the entry of the floating population into the urban labor market result in the new urban poverty problem. This essay discusses the concept of new urban poverty and the developments of the domestic and foreign researches on the new urban poverty, focused on the present states, characteristics and the causes of the Chinese new urban poverty first; it then offers some theoretical explanations in the respects of the economics, sociology, Poverty Research and geography to the phenomena of the new urban poverty. This paper explores the linkages of existing concepts and researches on the new urban poverty between Western countries and China, and then examines the origins, trends and spatial characteristics of the new urban poverty in China. It concludes that the urban poverty in China is a complex problem inextricable from current social economic structural changes in China, namely, the restructuring of SOEs (State Owned Enterprises), low income in private owned and self-employed sectors, and the changing urban labor market induced by massive rural in-migrants. Several policies should be taken in employment, social security and public services sectors to alleviate the severity of urban poverty in China.

 

Hadipour, Halimeh Khatoon (Session 1.2)

Faculty of Geography, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran

Email: hadipor@ut.ac.ir

Economic effects of accelerated urbanization in developing countries: Tehran a case study

Since 50 years ago, the world has experienced an increasing rate of urbanization. The trend has been different in developed and developing countries. In developed countries Urbanization was occurred simultaneously with industrialization but developing countries are faced with an overwhelming growth of urbanization without necessary industrial infrastructures. In this article we present a case study which focused on major economical effects of accelerated urbanization in Tehran as a typical metropolitan. Tehran has suffered from these effects in several ways such as increasing rates of land price, domination of service sectors to industrial ones, increasing number of unemployed people. The function of small cities and reallocation of resources in decentralization will also be discussed.

Hall, Sarah (Session 4.12)

School of Geography, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, UK; Email: Sarah.Hall@nottingham.ac.uk

Spaces of business education

Business schools, together with management gurus and consultants, have been identified as central actors in the dissemination and legitimation of business theory and knowledge. Within such debates, economic geographers have highlighted the changing institutional strategies of business schools in the global marketplace for professional education. However, comparatively less attention has been paid to the relationship between the burgeoning business education sector and economic practice. In response, this paper uses the case of professional, post-graduate financial education to advance conceptual understandings of the business education sector more generally and its role in shaping economic practice.

 


Hamilton, Trina (Session 1.14)

Department of Geography, SUNY at Buffalo (North Campus), 105 Wilkeson Quad, Buffalo, NY 14261-0055, USA

Email: trinaham@buffalo.edu

Breaking the brand: geographies of corporate responsibility and political possibility

In this paper I will use my research on environmental and social justice campaigns directed at U.S. multinational corporations to evaluate the types of social contracts that are being renegotiated between corporations and their stakeholders with this form of politics. Corporate campaigning is often dismissed as an inadequate political strategy for an extensive renegotiation of social priorities, yet I will argue that corporate campaigning can either constrict or reinvigorate the traditional political sphere depending on how it is enacted and conceived, and that these campaigns are in fact key sites in the diverse economies debate.

 

Hanzawa, Seiji (Session 2.5)

University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba Meguro-ku Tokyo 153-8902 Japan

Email: hanzawa@humgeo.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp

A comparative study about the agglomerations of the Japanese animation and home video game industries

The animation industry and the home video game industry represent two of the most widely-known contemporary Japanese cultural industries. These two industries share some similar characteristics: industrial agglomeration in Tokyo, SMEs, and intimate inter-firm relationships. Each agglomeration, however, has developed through different trajectories. These differences mainly arise from their peculiar distribution systems and production processes, which influence the behaviors of individual companies in each cultural industry. The former factor, in particular, influences each cultural industry companies' location decision about whether to value creativity or efficiency arisen from the agglomeration benefits.

Harrison, John (Session 1.7)

Department of Geography, Martin Hall Building, University of Loughborough, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU, UK

Email: j.harrison4@lboro.ac.uk

From competitive regions to competitive city regions: a new orthodoxy, but some old mistakes

Under the titles of ‘global city-regions’ and the new ‘city regionalism’, there has been a growing support for a resurgence of city-regions within economic geography. While sympathetic to the general tenor of the new city-regionalism, this paper argues for a more synthetic approach to understanding the significance of the city-region. It is argued that the same inherent weaknesses that undermined the previous new regionalist orthodoxy within economic geography, have been collapsed into the present focus upon the scale of the city-region. The paper concludes by looking at the broader implications of this for the future of economic geography.

 

Hassink, Robert (Session 2.14)

University of Oslo, Dept. of Sociology and Human Geography, P.O. Box 1096, NO-0317 Oslo, Norway; Email: robert.hassink@sgeo.uio.no

The emergence of computer and video game clusters: Seoul and Hamburg in comparison

In Germany and South Korea there are strong spatial concentrations of the computer and video game industry in Hamburg and Seoul. To what extent can we use the new industrial spaces concept to explain the emergence and concentration of this industry in these cities? Based on a recently carried out pilot project, the paper preliminary concludes that the new industrial spaces concept is of limited use in explaining the emergence of the computer and video games cluster in Hamburg and Seoul. Path dependent and contingent factors do play a more important role in explaining the observed spatial patterns.

 

Hassler, Markus (Session 2.21)
Department of Geography, Philipps-University Marburg, 35037 Marburg, Germany; Email: hassler@staff.uni-marburg.de
Changing production networks in Thailand: AFTA and its impact on regional development
Based on the recent debate on global production networks, this paper aims to contribute a context-sensitive theorization for the analysis of regional development in Thailand. This theorization aims in particular to pay tribute to the impact of multi-scalar political frameworks for regional development in Asia and the way they regulate local and non-local business linkages. In the case of Thailand, this multi-scalarity has been extended by the rather recent macro-regional establishment of the free trade area, AFTA. In theory, the formation of AFTA now allows for the extension of the potential market space for the sourcing of raw materials and components or the for sale of Thai manufactured goods. In this paper, the empirical sections aims to analyse the impact of the establishment of AFTA on sub-national regional development and how this regulatory framework has enhanced the establishment of macro-regional Southeast Asian production networks. This analysis is based on two comparable sets of extensive interview material, which were conducted prior to and after the establishment of AFTA in Thailand.

 

Haverluk, Terrence W. (Session 2.9)

US Air Force Academy, 2354 Fairchild Drive, USAF, CO 80840 USA

Email: Terrence.haverluk@usafa.af.mil

Feminist geopolitics: the US Air Force Academy, democracy, wealth, and power
In 1976 the US congress mandated that the US Air Force Academy (USAFA) and the US Military Academy (USMA) accept women. Since 1976, approximately 15% of the student body at these institutions is women. The change to allow women at the academies was in part a result of the feminist movement of the 1970s and reflects the increasing role of women in the military. Women are now essential to the US military, without them it could not function properly. This paper addresses potential linkages between women in the military and economic and political freedom, and state power.

 

Hayder, Adnane (Session 2.1)

Faculté des Sciences Humaines et Sociales. Université de Tunis. 94, Bd du 9 avril. 1007. Tunis. Tunisia; Email: adnanehayder@yahoo.fr

Regional dynamics in Tunisia

During the last four decades, the economic space in Tunisia changed in many aspects, due to globalization and increasing role of the private sector. A new structure is born where tourism, textile and other exporting activities constitute by their location and their relations determining factors. From a structure where the spatial dynamics tended to create ‘regional economic systems’, the Tunisian economic space began to be organized in a ‘gradient East- West’ with two coastal core regions, an intermediate band and an aggregate of interior zones. Within this structure, economic relations tend to be larger administrative units.

 

Hayter, Roger1 and Barnes, Trevor2 (Session 2.8)

1Department of Geography, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada, 2Department of Geography, 1984 West Mall, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z2 Canada

Email: hayter@sfu.ca

Neo-liberalism and its limits: a comparison of three forest economies

Resource peripheries from their inception under capitalism occupy the leading edge of neo-liberalism. Utterly reliant on outside free markets to sell their goods, resource peripheries also depend upon those same markets for imported equipment, capital and labour. This relation is not always straight forward, however, with neoliberalism always embedded in extant institutions and infrastructure of the local resource periphery, and which both enable and constrain. Using our three case studies of forest economies in BC, North Island New Zealand and Tasmania, we focus on two constraints found in neoliberal resource peripheries originating outside the market, aboriginalism and environmentalism.

 

He, Canfei and Pan, Fenghua (Session 4.15)

Department of Urban and Regional Planning, College of Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, 100871, China
Email: hecanfei@urban.pku.edu.cn

Geographical concentration of Chinese manufacturing industries: natural advantages, agglomeration economies and institutional changes

This paper examines the micro foundations of industrial agglomeration for three digit manufacturing industries in China at the province and county level using the most recent economic census data. The empirical results indicate that natural advantages, agglomeration economies and institutional changes together influence industrial location in China. Overall, industries bearing higher transportation costs and difficulty in shipping are largely dispersed. Resource-based industries follow the pattern of natural advantages and show less agglomeration, but metal mineral consuming industries are agglomerated at the county level. Trading establishments and foreign enterprises are heavily concentrated, confirming the globalization effects. However, local protectionism has discouraged industrial agglomeration, but provincial governments are more likely to succeed in exercising local protectionism and imitation strategy compared to the county governments. Agglomeration economies have done a better job in driving the geographical concentration of Chinese industries at the county level than at the province level. Proxies for knowledge spillovers are only significant at the county level. The findings suggest that the spatial scale matters in understanding industrial clustering and economic transition and its consequence are also critical in explaining the spatial pattern of Chinese industries.

 

Hedjazizadeh, Zahra (Session 4.5)

Associate Professor, Department of Geography, Teacher Training University, No 90, Mofatteh AVE, Tehran, Iran

Email: Hedjazizadeh@yahoo.com

The impact of Jajrood's climate upon the occurrence of landslides and its subsequent land devaluation in neighboring communities

Human modification and intervention has resulted in a very varied rural and urban spaces and landscapes. However, their sustainability entails more concerns with regard to the physical environment. Undue and improper attention to this matter may lead to the occurrence of natural hazard and calamities. Landslides are being considered as one of these calamities which threat rural and urban settlements. It is argued that frequent snow fall, precipitation over 400 mm, and the prevalence of cold and dry climate paved the way for landslide occurrence. The Last major landslide (2004) in the region has resulted in the removal of tonnes of debris, destruction of the only regional rout, inundation of the houses, pollution of river, and dissipation of toxic gases due to the sanitation field. These in turn, resulted in devaluation of land prices and subsequent changes in land uses. The major objective of this study is first to represent Jajrood climatic specifications, those which are very influential upon occurrence of landslide. The second aim is to evaluate and measure the economic impacts of landslide upon devaluation of land prices through comparable studies pertaining to last consecutive decades.

 

Hermelin, Brita (Session 2.1)
Department of Human Geography, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden; Email: brita.hermelin@humangeo.su.se

Swedish cities in ‘the space of flows’: national, European and global networks
Cities are internally related to the ‘outside’ via interconnections, which involve flows of information, persons, and goods. The idea about the importance of the situation of cities is widely acknowledged and discussed by a large number of authors and concepts such as ‘world cities’, ‘global cities’, and ‘globalising cities’ have emerged. This paper presents a literature overview of studies about Swedish cities in national, European and global networks of interconnections and flows. The paper also comprises a study of the advertising sector in Sweden and how firms in this sector are involved in national and international connections.

 

Hirczak, Maud and Senil, Nicolas (Session 2.24)

UMR PACTE 5194, Laboratoire Territoires, Institut de Géographie Alpine, 14bis rue Marie Reynoard, 38000 GRENOBLE, FRANCE

Email: nicolas_senil@yahoo.fr

Territory and heritage: the co-construction of one dynamic and its resources
Heritage is taking a growing place in regional planning policies. We want to approach this concept using the specific resource tools built from research in localized production systems. This allows us to cross-analyse the concepts of resource and heritage, which helps us to complete our initial theoretical point of view. Finally we propose a new form of resource which we call ‘territorial’, and the first pieces of its definition.


Hsing, You-tien (Session 4.6)

Department of Geography, #507 McCone Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Email: yhsing@berkeley.edu

Rebuilding China: land, power and territoriality

This paper is a summary of my forthcoming book entitled Rebuilding China: Politics of Land Development. As a result of a decade-long research on urban development in post reform China, this book starts from the twin issues of the transformation of the state and that of the society. While the former generates new intra-state reconfiguration of power, the latter triggers new frameworks in governance and resistance. The focus of this book is about how these twin phenomena shape and are shaped by the issue of land, and how land and power together shed lights on the question of territoriality of post-Mao China. The question of territoriality includes both the elite-oriented geopolitical analysis as well as the opportunities found in civil space. In this presentation, I will use three types of space, namely, inner city, urban-rural interface area, and rural towns to tell the story of three types of territorial politics in post-reform China.

 

Hsu, Jinn-Yuh (Session 1.10)

Department of Geography, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan; Email: jinnyuh@ntu.edu.tw

Transnationalism and Technology Transfer
Based on a perspective of social network, a growing body of transnationalism, or globalization from below, tried to decode the technology diffusion and transfer which were usually engaged exclusively with the transnational corporations and nation states. It contended that a transnational community of engineers has coordinated a decentralized process of reciprocal industrial upgrading by transferring capital, skill, and know-how to the source region and by facilitating collaborations between specialist producers in the two regions. In spite of the truth and contributions, most of the arguments did not take social network analysis seriously enough to tackle the potentials and pitfalls of transnationalist explanations. This paper will address the network structures by resorting to the concepts such as ‘structural holes’ and ‘tie strength’ which were raised by some well-noted economic sociologists.

 

Hu, Zhiyong (Session 2.15)

Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road, Chaoyang Distric, Beijing 100101, China; Email: huzy@igsnrr.ac.cn

Understanding the changing geography of China’s state-owned enterprises: a ‘new regionalism’ perspective

The growth dynamics of socialist transitional economy in general and China’s state-owned enterprises (SOEs) in particular, has long been the subject of great scholarly interest and extensive documentation. However, much of the existing literature is built upon analytical concepts and theoretical perspectives from economics, management science and other cognate social science disciplines without any significant contribution from economic geography. Drawing insights from the recently resurgent theories of firm-region nexus in new economic geography, this paper attempts to bridge this knowledge gap by examining the internal variations of SOEs situated in different regional economies undergoing profound structural changes. Through three sets of statistical analyses, this paper finds that there exists strong correlation between the spatially varied performance of SOEs and the extent of external economies unfolded in their situated regions. Empirical tests suggest that region is not passive receptacles of productive activities as implied by the extant literature in China studies, but instead active sources of external economies, the spatial manifestation of which affect to a considerable degree the success or failure of SOEs located therein. Introducing the perspective of new regionalism into the study of China’s SOEs proves to be an innovative geographical lens for Chins specialists to better examine the heterogeneity and complexity of China’s state-owned sector.

 

Hung, Po-Yi (Session 4.13)

Department of Geography, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 550 North Park Street, Madison, WI 53706, USA; Email: hung2@wisc.edu

Contested indigeneity: dichotomy, negotiation, and power of agricultural transformation and tourism development in Fataan, Taiwan

This paper examined the images used in representations of village life for Taiwan’s indigenous Amis people, focusing on the ecotourism destination village Fataan. Fataan is packaged as a site for ‘leisure agriculture,’ a local modality of ecotourism. By seeing Fataan not as a ‘given community,’ but a place of ongoing reconstitution, Fataan’s culture can be situated in and understood by a broader view of social relations and spatial reconstructions. Fataan’s culture cannot be interpreted as rigid territorialization or order; on the contrary, the invisible power battlefield inherent in historical and political processes has made it a re-created and changing product.

 

Inkinen, Tommi (Session 1.10)

Department of Geography, PO box 64, University of Helsinki, FIN-00014

Email: tommi.inkinen@helsinki.fi

Economic geography of Finnish research and development

This presentation focuses on the economic geography of Finnish research and development (R&D) activities. I will use R&D expenditure and employment figures to show the centralising tendencies supporting regional growth that is reflected to national level benchmark indicators. I use some examples from public sector policy documents to broaden the view to Finnish national innovation system that has several implications for regional policy. The role of university institutions is also acknowledged and the national condition of current university organisation is discussed with references to economic indicators. I will also propose some general guidelines for future research programming and trends.

 

Jin, Fengjun, Wang, Jiao’e and Mo, Huihui (Session 1.7)
Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research Chinese Academy of Sciences, Datun Road, Chaoyang Distric, Beijing 100101, China; Email: Jinfj@igsnrr.ac.cn
Railway network expansion and spatial accessibility evolution in China

This paper discusses the railway network in China from 1906 to 2000 mainly on three aspects: (1) expansion of railway network; (2) evolution of its spatial structure; (3) relationship between railway network expansion and economic growth. The evaluation is based on accessibility indexes such as  and using ‘the Shortest Path Model’. Firstly, an overview on the history of railway network expansion is presented, showing that China has been through four developmental phases: primary-constructing, pro-network-forming, network-extending and network-upgrading, with the special ‘Inland Expansion Pattern’. After more than 100 years of construction, China’s railway network has basically turned out to be mature with a pattern of ‘Temporal-Spatial Convergence’, that is, a formation of concentric circles with their axis in North China. The areas with higher than nationwide average level in accessibility, expanded from North China to East China and Middle China, and the center of railway network gradually moved from Tianjin to Zhengzhou. Moreover, we conclude that China’s railway network expansion has remarkably improved spatial economic structure and will be much more if the modernization in transport corridor is realized.

 

Jocoy, Christine L. (Session 2.3)

Department of Geography, 1250 Bellflower Blvd, California State University, Long Beach, CA 90840 USA; Email: cjocoy@csulb.edu

Geographies of homelessness policy in the US

The geography of local governmental jurisdiction plays a significant role in shaping social welfare policies in the US. Geographic narratives and economic practices underpin policy formulations and plans for human service delivery. This paper provides an overview of homelessness policy in the US. Through an analysis of policy documents and fieldwork as a participant observer, this paper examines the geographic narratives and economic practices invoked in existing legislation and by community involved in the creation of homelessness policies in Southern California. This work provides a basis for comparing the US context with other parts of the world.

 

Johns, Jennifer (Session 4.15)

School of Environment and Development, Geography, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, UK

Email: jennifer.l.johns@manchester.ac.uk

Power and networks: the film and television industry

Positioned within current concerns with the conceptualisation of ‘power’, this paper seeks to examine the nature of inherent power relations within film and television networks. The paper uses empirical data to illustrate how power relations affect the formation, maintenance and development of networks at all stages of the production process. Power dynamics between firms, individuals and institutions are conceptualised and examined. There are distinct differences in the power relations of networks across and within production stages. The paper concludes with links back to how such empirical observations can contribute to theories of power within economic geography.

 

Johnston, Chris (Session 4.3)

University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Department of Geography, 103 Highland Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14222, USA

Email: ctj4@Buffalo.Edu

Locational and strategic determinants of Chinese FDI in the United States

The purpose of the research is to explore the locational determinants and patterns of Chinese outward foreign direct investment (FDI) in the United States. At its simplest, it will begin to research where Chinese FDI is going within the United States, what industries are being selected, and the patterns of location choice. A secondary objective is to examine the factors that influence the location decision. My central proposition is that China is investing in the U.S. as a means of acquiring technology and know-how by establishing subsidiaries and/or acquiring existing companies. This represents a new trend in China’s recent economic trajectory, as the country largely acquired technology and know-how via inward FDI.

 

Jones, Andrew (Session 1.9)

School of Geography, Birkbeck College University of London Malet Street London, WC1E 7HX UK; Email: a.jones@bbk.ac.uk

Theorising face-to-face interaction in the global corporation – towards a conceptual framework

Recent debates in the ‘new’ economic geography have developed renewed interested in the role of face-to-face interaction in (global) business activity. However, much of the conceptual discussion of face-to-face interaction has been situated in debates around agglomeration, global cities and physical proximity in ‘place’. This paper argues that the nature and key significance of face-to-face interaction within and between transnational firms has been neglected, and that better theories to be developed. Drawing on empirical examples, it thus proposes a conceptual framework for understanding the key importance of face-to-face interactions to the activities of transnational firms in all sectors of the global economy.

 

Juniper, James (Session 2.2)

Rm SRS 239, School of Economics, Politics & Tourism, University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW, 2300, Australia

Email: james.juniper@newcastle.edu.au

Macroeconomics, regional development and regional innovation: a framework for integration
The objective of this paper is to review influential theories of Regional Development and Corporate Governance from a Post-Keynesian macroeconomic perspective with a view to developing at a rigorous inter-disciplinary framework for the analysis of Innovation and Regional Development. In particular, it will combine Lazonick and O’Sullivan’s ‘Social Conditions of the Innovative Enterprise’ framework with Mitchell and Juniper’s (2007) ‘Spatial Keynesianism’ to focus on the relationship between (spatially articulated) macroeconomic policies of full employment, infrastructure development and training, and regional innovation policy, with a view to promoting regional development more generally.

Kalogeressis, Athanassios and Labrianidis, Lois (Session 2.16)
University of Macedonia, Egnatia 156, 54006 Thessaloniki, Greece

Email: kaloger@uom.gr
An assessment of the failure to internationalize: a comparison of Greece with the late transition economies
The paper analyses the different trajectories that Greece, versus the late transition economies, followed with regard to delocalisation of economic activities. In fact, while some transition economies were latecomers, they seem to be doing much better than Greece. The paper is based on a European Union (FP 6) research project on the delocalisation of labour intensive industries and was focused on five countries; two 'older' EU members, i.e. the UK and Greece, two recent ones, i.e. Poland and Estonia and one from the very last 'wave' of accession, i.e. Bulgaria. The focus of the project was on four sectors, i.e. clothing, footwear, electronics and software. A total of 756 extensive semi structured questionnaires that contained 272 variables were conducted during the June 2005-August 2006 period. The qualitative part of the questionnaire was processed on the SPSS while the qualitative part on the Nvivo. Furthermore, 100 key informant interviews were conducted with academics, business people, trade union leaders etc.

 

Karaaslan, Sule and Yilmaz, Gülsen (Session 4.12)

Gazi University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of City and Regional Planning, 06570, Ankara, Turkey

Email: sulekara@gmail.com

Geographical analysis of banks in Istanbul metropolitan area in Turkey

Banks in Istanbul offers a unique opportunity to understand changes in the urban economy and urban development. The aim of this study is to analyze the spatial distribution of banks in Istanbul metropolitan area in the urban transformation context. Firstly, within the globalizing world, the transformation of Istanbul from mono-centric to polycentric is investigated. And then the historical development of central business districts (CBD) is generally overviewed. Finally, the spatial distributions of banks are analyzed according to districts.

 

Karreman, Bas (Session 1.1)

Erasmus University Rotterdam, Department of Applied Economics (H13-11), P.O. Box 1738, 3000 DR Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Email: karreman@few.eur.nl

Functional complementarity of financial centers: the case of Shanghai and Hong Kong

The contemporary rise of China in the new geo-economy is increasingly pressurizing the spatial and functional distribution of financial activity in mainland China and Hong Kong. With the re-emergence of Shanghai, many people foresee the future demise of Hong Kong as the most important financial center for the Chinese mainland. By analyzing the regional distribution pattern and sectoral division of mainland China controlled companies listed on the Hong Kong or Shanghai stock market, it is argued that the future development paths of both financial centers are rather distinct. Therefore, both financial centers can be characterized as functional complements.

 

Kaswan, Nathuram (Session 1.9)

Govt. College, SriGanganagar #887,Ward No. 15, Purani Abadi, SriGanganagar - 335001, Rajasthan, India

Email: nrkaswan@rediffmail.com

Ecocentric geophilosopy of sustainable economy

Ecocentric geophilosphy of sustainable economy deals with the preservation of intact and unspoiled earth on the one hand and restoration of degraded and wounded earth on the other. Longevity of the earth, within a purposefully designed universe, is the prime concern of ecocentric geophilosophy. The green vision of a peaceful world moving beyond industrialism is now more compelling and urgent than ever before. Green politics has spread throughout the world. A green movement has emerged to transform the industrial technology to a green technology. A green perspective can change the way people think and act. Ecocentric geophilosophy of sustainability is based on a perennial green vision of peaceful world. Hence ecocentric geophilosophy is somewhere very near a deep ecological consciousness. This does not mean the rejection of a man-in-environment image but favours a deep interrelationship between man and environment. Sustainable economy is a function of an integration of environment and development concerns. Ecofriendly economic development will lead us to achieving our basic needs, better life style, safer tomorrow and prosperous future for all. Sustainable economy refers to the problem of poverty eradication keeping in view the fact that poverty anywhere is a challenge to prosperity everywhere. Fighting against poverty is our obligation not aspiration. A sustainable economy keeps the developmental level from falling once it is attained. Ecocentric economic awareness does not allow one to damage or deform the structural and functional design of natural infrastructure of the given set of surrounding, rather it helps to ameliorate the degraded situation and maintain sustainability for the system society as well as for the system earth.

 

Kawase, Masaki (Session 4.22)

Faculty of Commercial Sciences, Hiroshima Shudo University, 1-1-1 Ozukahigashi, Asaminami-ku, Hiroshima, 731-3195 Japan

Email: kawase@shudo-u.ac.jp

Gender differences in commuting and employment in Japan
Women's employment has been approached through analysis of regional labor markets in Japanese economic geography. Moreover, gender difference in life actions has been mentioned in commuting studies and time geography. The average commuting time of married women is shorter than unmarried men because household responsibilities limit employment opportunities and commuting distance for wives. Conversely, the average commuting time of unmarried women is longer than unmarried men in metropolitan suburbs because many unmarried men live alone near workplace; unmarried women,
however, are forced into long distance commuting from their parents' home.

Kelly, Philip (Session 2.21)
Dept of Geography, York University, 4700 Keele St, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. M3J 1P3; Email: pfkelly@yorku.ca

Global reproduction networks in a Philippine growth zone
This paper pursues the concept of the global production network, but traces it through the connections created by households rather than firms. By examining the effects of industrial investment in a rapidly growing area of the Philippines, the paper shows that it is not just firms in their global networks that determine local development processes. Instead, we see the most dramatic forms of local development fostered by networks that encompass processes of social reproduction and incorporate flows of domestic and international migration and remittances.

 

Khamaisi, Rassem (Session 4.2)
Department of Geography and Environment Studies, University of Haifa, Haifa, Mount Carmel 31905, Israel; Email:
Rassem@013.net

Barriers to local development in localities that are experiencing urbanization processes: a case study of Arab localities in Israel
In general, urbanization processes go hand in hand with economic growth, industrialization activities and the creation of jobs in service sectors. These processes lead to local economic development. In some cases, this development must cope with both external and internal barriers, which often result in a 'false urbanization'. False urbanization occurs when local development is limited and the gaps between local development among localities expands. These gaps are a result of ethno-national belonging and geographical locations. In Israel, Arab Palestinian citizens account for about twenty percent of the country's population. Most of these indigenous people live in small localities undergoing urbanization processes, located in the periphery of the country, and suffer from barriers which reduce their economic development. The lecture will describe, analyze and discuss these external and internal barriers which limit local development and create false urbanization processes among Arab localities in Israel.

 

Kiese, Matthias (Session 4.21)

Leibniz University of Hannover, Institute of Economic and Cultural Geography, Schneiderberg 50, D-30167, Hannover, Germany

Email: kiese@wigeo.uni-hannover.de

Theory led by policy? The case of regional cluster policies in Germany

Conceptual deficiencies and unsatisfactory empirical evidence notwithstanding, clusters enjoy continuing popularity amongst policymakers and economic development practitioners while academics have apparently been overrun by the cluster hype. Economic geography can help reverse this tide by analysing the theoretical content of cluster concepts as they are interpreted in politics and ultimately put into practice. The paper develops a political-economy framework distinguishing a conceptual, a political and a practical actions space, each of which are governed by different rationalities. This is then tested and modified using case studies from three federal states in Germany and seven sub-regional and local political cluster initiatives therein, based on over 100 in-depth interviews with practitioners, consultants and observers.

 

Kim, Sook-Jin and Wainwright, Joel (Session 1.3)
Department of Geography, The Ohio State University, 1036 Derby Hall, 154 North Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210-1361, USA

Email: kimx0630@umn.edu

Neoliberalism, transnationalism and the Korea-USA Free Trade Agreement

By examining the dynamics of the Korean farmers’ movement against the Korea-USA Free Trade Agreement negotiations in Seattle in September 2006, we argue that the negotiations and resistances in Seattle reflect (a) elite practices that aim at facilitating neoliberal transnationalism and (b) resistance practices that reflect ‘anti-neoliberal’ transnationalism. Yet states, social movements, and elites are not transnationalizing in the same ways, through the same practices, or in the same spaces. This is not only because they reflect the positions of different social classes, but also because the ‘nation’ that they transcend is different, and the practice of transnationalism varies spatially and in ways that reflect global-local articulations.

 

Kim, Yeong-Hyun (Session 4.22)

Department of Geography, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701, USA

Email: kimy1@ohio.edu

Working hard but still poor and foreign: returning emigrants in Seoul
This research explores the socio-economic and spatial marginalization of ethnic Koreans (Korean Chinese) in Seoul. The Korean Diaspora in Northeast China, estimated at two million people, was created during the Japanese colonial period. Since the early 1990s, however, a growing number of ethnic Koreans have returned to South Korea as low-wage migrant workers. A reasonable estimate of ethnic Korean migrants, legal and illegal combined, is 200,000 250,000. The return migration of ethnic Koreans has challenged the established notion of Korean-nes among South Koreans, but the returning emigrants have encountered severe socio-economic and spatial marginalization in their ethnic homeland.

Knox, Janelle (Session 4.6)
University of Oxford, Green College, Woodstock Road 43, Oxford, OX2 -6HG, UK; Email: janelle.knox@green.ox.ac.uk

Building atmospheric liquidity: the opportunities and challenges of developing an interconnected emissions trading market

Carbon emissions markets are gaining momentum in Europe and the United States as one of the main approaches to addressing climate change. Although much political and financial support has been bolstered for the schemes, they still face considerable challenges. Based on conversations in New York and London, this paper reviews the developing opportunities for a global market of carbon emissions, and the current difficulties the schemes face in becoming interconnected. Of particular concern is regulatory cohesion across the United States and Europe, underlying differences in financial market structures, and problem of how to successfully engage the trading schemes on a global scale.

 

Knutsen, Hege Merete (Session 2.21)

Department of Sociology and Human Geography, University of Oslo, Box 1096 Blindern, 0317 Oslo, Norway; Email: h.m.knutsen@sgeo.uio.no

Context-sensitive explanations of creation and appropriation of value: lessons from Vietnam

Conventional notions of context tend to refer to place-specific conditions only. The paper addresses why it is important to apply a multidimensional concept of context including place, space, scale, institutions and time, and how this could be applied in analyses of creation and appropriation of value in different industrial networks. The relationship between the context at large and its institutional dimension will be discussed. First, shifting global and regional trade regimes, investment regimes and labour regimes are institutional trans-local forces that affect the structure of industry at the place-specific level. Second, while operationalizations of the concept of the institutional often are limited to state organisations and government policies and regulations in a given study area, findings from Vietnam illustrate the importance of applying the concept in its full breadth, which also includes informal regulations and norms and values in the study area. Last but not least, it is important to revitalize the notion of time in development of context-sensitive theories. This is in order to assess challenges of being a late-comer country to industrialization and participation in global and regional networks. Shaped by trans-local and local forces, industry structure and employment relations are essential factors in explanations of creation and appropriation of value. This is highlighted by networks formed around low-cost products such as textile and garments.


Koo, Yangmi and Park, Sam Ock (Session 4.6)

Department of Geography, College of Social Sciences, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Shillim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, Korea
Email: yangmi@snu.ac.kr
Population aging and industries for the elderly in Korea

Population aging is one of the main issues in 21st century and is expected to affect individual and society extensively. Korea has already become ‘aging society’ in 2000 indicating that the percentage of the population aged 65 and over is above 7%, and that percentage is increasing rapidly. Facing these social and economic challenges, Korean government and institutions are interested in promoting industries for the elderly under the policy of ‘Plan for Aging Society and Population’. This paper focuses on the overview of elderly market and firms, particularly the sector of products for the elderly in Korea.

 

Kosonen, Kati-Jasmin (Session 2.17)
33014 University of Tampere, Finland (Yliopistonkatu 60 A)
Email: kati-jasmin.kosonen@uta.fi
Self-renewal capacity of evolving industrial clusters in the less favoured Finnish regions
The idea is to develop the framework of self-renewal capacity in certain diversifying industrial clusters in Finland. The self-renewal capacity represents here a set of processes that can be intentionally designed and constructed, but are open for emergent ideas and linkages to global knowledge networks. The aim is to analyse how creative and interpretative spaces enhance continuous renewal and innovativeness in diversifying and therefore evolving industrial clusters. For the researchers, developers and policy-makers in industrial clusters in the LFRs as Hämeenlinna, Pori and Seinäjoki town regions, it would be of importance to have analytical tools for understanding their roles in the regional development in those spaces.

 

Krueger, Rob1 and Gibbs, David2 (Session 2.8)

1WPI 100 Institute Road Worcester, MA 01609 USA, 2University of Hull, UK; Email: krueger@wpi.edu

New-liberalism and sustainability? An institutional approach

Two recent phenomena indicate that major shifts are underway in the organisation of economies – the growth of a new knowledge-based economy, located in competitive city-regions, and the adoption of sustainable development as an overarching guiding principle for local development policies. This paper is concerned with looking at the emergence of new institutional forms that exist at this nexus between these two phenomena. Some authors have suggested that these forms are functional for neo-liberal policies in a competitive environment. While this may be true to some extent, we are interested in exploring whether these institutional changes represent a more fundamental shift in economy-environment relations. We build upon work in geography and political science on institutions, drawing in particular upon a decentred institutional approach to explore the political struggles involved in creating new institutional forms. We examine these issues through a study of smart growth policies in a number of US knowledge-based city-regions.

 

Kukely, György (Session 2.16)

Centre for Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1380 Budapest P.O.Box 1182, Hungary; Email: kukely@rkkmta.hu

Changing role of research and development in the foreign direct investments in Central Eastern Europe

There is an increasing competition among nations and regions due to the multinational enterprises (MNEs) and their high value-added activities. After the millennium, the motivation of the R&D location has changed. Since then, more and more R&D centers of the MNEs have been established in Central Eastern Europe. The MNEs are playing a growing role in the national innovation systems by deepening the cooperation with the local universities and research institutes. However, the further embeddedness of the R&D activities of the MNEs should be strengthened by economic policies.

 

Kulke, Elmar (Session 4.4)

Department of Geography, Humboldt-University at Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin, Germany; Email: elmar.kulke@geo.hu-berlin.de

Creating an creative milieu – the case of Berlin-Adlershof

Spatial concentrations of research, development and production with intensive cooperation and the exchange of tacit-knowledge pose competitive advantages. But up to now, it is open to discussion, whether spatial economic policy is able to encourage the development of these creative milieus. 15 years ago, spatial economic policy started to support the development of the technology park Berlin-Adlershof. This study explains the development path of Berlin-Adlershof and analyses to what extent networks have developed. The innovative strength of the location is documented and it is evaluated, whether spatial policy is able to create a creative milieu.

 

Kusar, Simon (Session 2.1)

Department of Geography, Faculty of Arts, University of Ljubljana, Askerceva 2, SI – 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia, European Union

Email: simon.kusar@ff.uni-lj.si

Regional development agencies: new institutional factor influencing the dynamics of regional development in Slovenia

The institutional approach in economic geography emphasizes the role of different institutions for the enhancement of economic development. Changes in Slovenian regional policy in 1999 introduced regional development agencies as institutions for promoting regional development in statistical regions (NUTS 3). The main question is therefore how this new form of governance on the regional level influences the economic performance of regions. The article will bring the analysis of their plans and evaluation of their efficiency using a selected set of indicators. In the end some current problems and future orientations for the new programming period will be discussed too.

 

Kweka, Opportuna (Session 4.7)
University of Minnesota, P.O. Box 13267 Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Email: kwek0001@umn.edu
Economic reforms in Tanzania: regional development and livelihood insecurity of refugees

This paper provides a temporal and spatial analysis of the implementation of economic reform policies in Tanzania. A review of studies on economic reforms in Africa reveals that there are no enough empirical data to support the claim that economic reforms have had negative impact on development. Most of the studies are generalized for a country, but localities’ history and geographical backgrounds account for differential impact of the policies. In this paper, I examine the impact of changes in the labor market, land tenure system, role of the state, on regional development and livelihood of Burundian refugees in Kigoma.

 

Laage-Hellman, Jens and Rickne, Annika (Session 4.11)

CIRCLE Lund University, P.O. Box 117, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden

Email: annika.rickne@circle.lu.se

Regional knowledge dynamics in Swedish biomedicine

This paper deals with the puzzle of how to create regional innovation and growth in a context where firms and research organizations are highly linked to the global economy. Biomedicine and biotechnology – often identified as areas that could be used to stimulate economic growth – are good examples of such regionally based but globally interlinked sectors. In this paper the case of a regional development initiative for biomedicine in Sweden is used to address questions related to the development of sectoral regional innovation systems.

 

Labrianidis, Lois and Kalogeressis, Athanassios (Session 2.16)

University of Macedonia, Egnatia 156, 54006 Thessaloniki, Greece

Email: loisl@uom.gr

Living next to the transition: the role of cultural and geographical proximity in flows of FDI, migration and trade between transition and developed economies

The paper analyses how different localities present different opportunities and threats for delocalisation of economic activities. The paper is primarily focused on the Greek - Bulgarian borders and analyses how proximity (geographic, cultural etc.) constitutes an enabling factor even for very small firms to become international (Local Delocalisation).

The paper is based on a European Union (FP 6) research project on the delocalisation of labour intensive industries that was focused on five countries; two 'older' EU members, i.e. the UK and Greece, two recent ones, i.e. Poland and Estonia and one from the very last 'wave' of accession, i.e. Bulgaria. The focus of the project was on four sectors, i.e. clothing, footwear, electronics and software. A total of 756 extensive semi-structured questionnaires that contained 272 variables were conducted during the June 2005-August 2006 period. The qualitative part of the questionnaire was processed on the SPSS while the qualitative part on the Nvivo. Furthermore, 100 key informant interviews were conducted with academics, business people, trade union leaders etc.

 

Lai, Christine A.1 and Poon, Jessie P. H.2 (Session 1.12)

1Damen College, 130 Patton Place, Williamsville, NY 14221 USA, 2105 Wilkeson Quad, Dept. of Geography, University at Buffalo-SUNY, Buffalo, New York 14261, USA; Email: clai@daemen.edu

The role of location in the marketing strategy of nonprofit performing arts organizations

This paper seeks to determine the relative importance of location in the marketing strategy of nonprofit performing arts organizations (PAOs). Based on a survey of PAOs in six second tier U.S. statistical metropolitan areas (SMAs), this paper will investigate: (i) the attributes that explain the location of PAOs in the SMAs and (ii) the extent to which location influences the success of PAOs. All six SMAs have a population range of 1 million to 2.5 million. While they are located in a region that has witnessed a decline in manufacturing activities, the cities however are relatively rich in cultural and arts activities.

 

Lai, Karen (Session 1.8)

School of Geography, University of Nottingham, University Park , Nottingham NG7 2RD , UK; Email: lgxpyl@nottingham.ac.uk

One country, two banking systems? Contesting visions of ‘markets’ in Shanghai

The process of market-making and the actors involved are spread across scales and much of what is happening within a financial centre is determined by economic and political considerations elsewhere on the national, regional and global levels. In this paper, I examine the relationship between states and global finance capital in Shanghai and different understandings of 'market'. How do different agendas, interests, knowledge, historical contexts and constraints faced by state institutions and global financial firms and their visions for the financial markets in Shanghai influence power relations between these actors and the process of negotiation and market formation? Discussions are drawn from fieldwork conducted with local regulatory authorities and foreign financial institutions in Shanghai, focusing on banking services, the securities market and the strategies of foreign banks as they negotiate between local regulatory environment and market conditions and the wider context of their global operations and strategies.

 

Larner, Wendy (Session 2.2)

School of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol, University Road, Bristol BS8 1SS, UK; Email: w.larner@bristol.ac.uk

Situating neoliberalism: geographies of a contested concept
Over the last decade social scientists from a wide variety of disciplinary and theoretical perspectives have developed analyses of neoliberalism. Despite the rapidly growing literature there remains a great deal of confusion. What exactly does the term capture? Is it an academic and activist caricature of a pragmatic policy consensus that now has adherents across the traditional left-right political spectrum? Does the term provide analytical purchase for those attempting to understand the new ways in which economic and social relations are understood and acted upon? Is neoliberalism a successor to post-war political formations or a temporary political accommodation? Or is it more useful to focus on the qualitative transformation of political spaces and subjects? The answers to these questions, of course, depend on how neoliberalism is understood both theoretically and politically.

 

Lawton Smith, Helen (Session 2.17)

Department of Management, Birkbeck, University of London, Malet St, Bloomsbury, London, WC1E 7HX, UK

Email: h.lawton-smith@bbk.ac.uk

R&D activities in foreign-owned firms in the UK: strategy, power and globalisation

One of the central concerns for both the European Union and at the member state level is how to retain R&D capacity in foreign-owned companies in the face of growing competition from developing countries such as China, India and Russia on the one hand, and the US with its major markets on the other. This paper reports on the findings from five interviews with R&D intensive multinational companies in the Oxfordshire region. These form the UK component of a current eight country European Commission Framework 6 study which is concerned with factors that drive locational decisions on R&D by internationally operating firms. Analytically the study is concerned with how power is exercised at the local level as a consequence of centralised decisions on R&D strategies in the global economy - the extent to which senior managers in the individual sites have autonomy to make decisions and determine practices relating to intra- and inter-organisational networks - for example with local universities. The study shows that in the short-term there are geo-historical reasons why companies will maintain core activities in Europe, while in the longer term, the pattern of relocation of R&D to countries which have supplies of the kinds of highly–skilled people that are diminishing in Europe will escalate.

 

Lee, Yong-Sook (Session 2.15)
Dept of Geography, National University of Singapore, 1 Arts Link, Singapore 117570; Email: geolys@nus.edu.sg

Balanced development in globalizing regional development: unpacking the new regional policy in South Korea

This article critically examines the new regional policy based on the 'new regionalism' idea in South Korea. In this paper, I argue that the new regional policy poses a dualism between endogenism and exogenism and thus fails to reformulate and re-articulate the theoretical and policy views on globalizing regional development. Instead of the dualism, I develop a concept of 'multi-scalar governance' as an analytical lens for understanding regional development in the era of globalization. Based on this viewpoint of multi-scalar governance, the drawbacks of the new regional policy - the triangular inter-scalar coordination problems are specifically reviewed. For this policy analysis, I have employed mainly archival analysis and in-depth interviews with the policy makers

 

Leib, Jonathan (Session 4.13)

Florida State University, Department of Geography, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-2190, USA; Email: jleib@fsu.edu

Foreign direct investment and cultural change in the southern United States

Over the past fifteen years, debates have occurred in the American South over the region’s cultural identity. One primary focus of these debates has concerned flying the American Civil War’s most recognizable symbol, the Confederate flag, seen by many of the region’s whites as a symbol of heritage and regional pride and by many African Americans as a symbol of racism. At the same time, many states in the region have been in vigorous competition for FDI, most notably branch plants of foreign automobile companies. As part of this effort, white business leaders have called for the removal of Confederate emblems from their state capitols and flags for fear that foreign investors will equate its presence with poor race relations. Through a series of case studies from the region, this presentation examines the debates over the flag and FDI in (re)constructing Southern identity.

 


Lepawsky, Joshua (Session 2.21)

Memorial University of Newfoundland, Department of Geography St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada, A1B-3X9; Email: jlepawsky@mun.ca
Firms as exceptions: creativity and the cultural politics of firm location in Malaysia’s Multimedia Super Corridor

In 1995 Malaysia inaugurated its Multimedia Super Corridor (MSC). Laws were passed to induce an agglomeration of ‘creative’, ‘high-tech’ industries in an urban zone exempt from national political-juridical norms. Firms have been overlooked in the literature that takes the MSC to be paradigmatic of new forms of urban economic development and social regulation in Asia. Drawing on theories of ‘exception’ I hypothesise that analyses of forms of economic development and social regulation like the MSC need to be sensitive to firms as emergent sites of the social, where economic action and cultural praxis fuse politically.

 

Leppänen, Laura (Session 2.10)

University of Turku, Department of Geography, FIN-20014 Turku, Finland; Email: laura.leppanen@utu.fi

The state space interaction in Finland – towards a Nordic Competition state?

My paper is about the interaction between the state and territory. I seek to provide a context sensitive theorization about the gradual transformation of Finland from the Keynesian welfare-state policies to the more competition-based state strategies. I suggest that the idea of the ‘central governmental problem’ of state administration is constituted in discursive structures and the discursive change from ‘the regimes of national survival’ to ‘international competition regimes’ inescapably influences the relationship between the Finnish state and its territory representing a complex combination of the marketplace model and one nation politics.

 

Leslie, Deborah (Session 1.7)

Department of Geography, 100 St. St. George Street, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3G3, Canada

Email: deborah.leslie@utoronto.ca

Geographies of displacement in the creative city: the case of Liberty Village, Toronto

This paper analyses new industry formation in Liberty Village – a cultural industry precinct in inner city Toronto, Canada. After an initial period of haphazard artist-led regeneration, city planners took a more active role in the 1990s, promoting cultural industry formation through the implementation of flexible zoning and public-private partnerships. Liberty Village has been the site of a series of conflicts surrounding changing land uses, rising real estate values, and shifting demographics. This paper highlights the various displacements associated with Liberty Village, examining three scales in particular- the level of the city, the neighbourhood and the precinct itself. An examination of these displacements foregrounds the contested nature of the creative city script.

 

Levelt, Melika and Tordoir, Pieter (Session 4.14)

AMIDSt, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Nieuwe Prinsengracht 130, 1018 VZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Email: m.levelt@uva.nl

The Netherlands as a cluster of trade and logistics

Why has the Netherlands a strong position in international trade? Whilst trade patterns are often explained as the result of competitive advantages of nations leading to industrial specializations and trade between countries, with gravitation models or more sociological as a result of the spreading of tacit knowledge within trade networks, these theories alone seem not able to explain the re-export flows that now count for almost half of Dutch exports. To explain these flows, we look at how trade and logistic activities are intertwined or clustered in the Netherlands and attract redistributional activities within value chains to the Netherlands.

 

Lewis, Nick (Session 4.12)
School of Geography, Geology and Environmental Science, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand
Email: n.lewis@auckland.ac.nz
Micro-practices of globalizing education: branding

This paper uses a case study of nation branding practices in the building of an export education industry in New Zealand to examine how education is being globalised. The paper directs attention to the micro-practices of both industry building and globalisation. It positions nation branding alongside calculative practices such as benchmarking, the establishment of accreditation schemes, the signing of credit agreements, and the building of student pathways. The paper argues that these practices are performative technologies that connect entrepreneurial universities to industry building institutions and neoliberal political projects.

 

Li, Er-ling and Li, Xiaojian (Session 4.9)
College of Environment and Planning, Henan University, Kaifeng 475001, China; Email: erlingli@yahoo.com.cn

Industrial cluster: the new development-patterns of the traditional farming regions under globalization

According to many analysts, the rural development based on industrial clusters in China can be classified into two types: endogenous development and exogenous development. However, there are not enough case studies to examine ‘the third way’ of rural development that stresses the interplay between the local and external forces. Based on a case study on the hair products cluster in Xuchang county, Xuchang city, Henan province, by means of social network analysis, this paper explores how a cluster located in traditional farming region in inland rural China exemplifies ‘the third way ‘ of global-local network linkages.

 

Li, Li (Session 1.2)
Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Datun Road, No 11 Plus, Anwai, Beijing, China; Email: lil.05s@igsnrr.ac.cn

An analysis of disparities in the growth of regional economies in China and its factor decomposition using prefecture level data

This paper analyzes the disparities in variation of regional economies in China between 1999 and 2004 period, using prefecture level data. Firstly, the growth of each region measured by GDP share and GDP per capita, is classified into five groups. Moreover, to better understand the role of regions in national growth, changes in the GDP share of cities in total are decomposed into provincial and prefectural factors which are further analyzed by decomposing them into changes in four major components using modified OECD approach. Finally, the results point out some major factors that policies might highlight in reducing regional disparities.

 

Li, Pei (Session 1.12)
Renmin University of China Yiyuan 3 Room 401, China 100872

Email: ruchansy@yahoo.com.cn

Metropolitan economic growth and spatial dependence: evidence from a panel of China

There are a number of theoretical reasons why cities interacts with each other. Such spatial interdependence has been largely ignored by the empirical literature with only a couple of recent papers accounting for such issues in their estimation. This paper takes spatial dependence panel data models in specifying and testing to analyze three metropolitan growth behaviors in China. We find that controlling for fixed-effects allows us to disentangle the effect of spatial dependence from that of spatial heterogeneity and of omitted variables and the three metropolitan areas might be said to represent three distinct stages during the urbanization of China.

 


Li, Pengfei (Session 2.20)

Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Peking University, Peking 100871, China; Email: mrlipengfei@gmail.com

Cluster development in China: a perspective of industry relocation

In the flat world, the role of geography is not nullified. Geographical concentration is a common phenomenon of economy throughout the world, especially in some districts in Italy, Germany and so on. So a body of literature is contributed to finding the reason of, as Ann Markusen termed, ‘the ‘sticky place’ in slippery place’. But what we find in China is that some industry clusters, for example, the lamp industry cluster studied here, might be relocated in an unexpectedly short time, like in just several years. In this paper, we find two interesting points which may shed some light to the literature of clusters. The first is state-owned enterprise plays an important role of the migration of lamp industry cluster from Wen Zhou to Gu Zhen. The second is that we conclude two different kinds of clusters formed by complete industry relocation and partial industry relocation respectively.

 

Li, Xiaojian, Qiao, Jiajun, Gao, Genghe, and Kong, Yunfeng (Session 2.18)
National Key Centre for Yellow River Civilization & Sustainable Development, Henan University, Kaifeng 475001, China
Email: xjli@henu.edu.cn

What geography plays in determining rural household income: evidence from 13000 rural households in Henan Province, China

Existing literature on regional income inequality in China has paid little attention to rural households, especially those in less industrialized rural areas. This study uses the data from a sample survey conducted in April 2007on 13 000 rural households in 11 villages of Henan, the largest less developed agricultural province in China, to examine rural inequality and factors contributing to rural income. It is found that rural income at the household-level is still significantly different across rural areas. Geographical location, as measured by distance from the closest city, has played an important role in explaining the difference. Other factors including natural resources endowment and the development of economic crops are also geographically related. Along with the relaxation of out-migration restriction in rural population, a new factor, rural-to-urban migration, becomes increasingly important in explaining rural household income. The development of rural economy makes geography less important in determining rural inequality.

 


Li, Xiuwei (Session 1.9)
Room 1521, 11A, Datun Road, Anwai Beijing 100101, China

Email: lixw.06b@igsnrr.ac.cn

The scientific connotation and space organization mechanisms of the Compact City
The Compact City is a new spatial form receiving wide discussions among planners and other urban scholars in searching for sustainable urban development. This paper probes into the scientific connotation of the Compact City through analyzing the relation between humanity and nature, the rule of technology and economy, the bearing capacity of resources and environment, the level of energy supply and consumption, and ethics and culture value. The paper then illustrates the space organization mechanisms of the Compact City in the context of system science, geography and economics.

 

Li, Yajing and Lee, Roger (Session 1.14)
Department of Geography, Queen Mary, University of London Mile End Road London E1 4NS UK; Email:
yajing.li@qmul.ac.uk
Geography, finance and trust: the Bank of China’s IPO, Hong Kong 2006
This paper examines the dynamic geographies of the relations of trust involved in the Bank of China’s IPO placed in Hong Kong in 2006. This IPO forms part of the Bank’s wider strategy of going global and, thereby, of changing its corporate geography and its wider relationships within the financial system. The paper argues that i) spaces of money and finance are negotiated among different actors whose actions are affected by their judgement about relationships of trust; ii) trust is a socio-spatial relation; and iii) as such, ‘going global’ involves significant transformations in the geographies of trust that have to be negotiated by the Bank. The IPO illustrates these processes in a variety of ways.

 

Lin, George (Session 2.15)

School of Geography, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong; Email: GCSLIN@hkucc.hku.hk

Scaling up regional development in globalizing China: local capital accumulation, land-centered politics, and reproduction of space

 The resurgent of regionalism after the globalization fever has shifted attention to some regionally specific relational assets as the sources of dynamic, innovative, and competitive regional development. Recent research has suggested, however, that extra-regional linkages have played a role as important as, if not greater than, that of internal relations. This article critically evaluates the perennial debate over endogenism or exogenism in the study of regional development ever since the dependency theory was introduced. It is argued that the current debate over the sources of regional development fall short in at least four important respects, namely 1) it fails to explain how a regional economy has come into being; 2) it privileges technological innovation and labor relations over capital accumulation and land development; 3) it gives inadequate consideration of the crucial role played by local state; and 4) it focuses on the gain of those who have competitive advantages but fails to explain the loss of the disadvantaged and powerless. Its explanatory power is severally limited because it fails to explain growing regional inequality, social unrest, peasants' resentment, and environmental degradation.

 

Lin, Tao (Session 1.12)
100 Guinlin Road, Shanghai, 200234, Geography Dept., Shanghai Normal University, China; Email: lin_tao@shnu.edu.cn

On the cross-border urban system development and planning: case study Yangtze Delta

In China, the local governments, especially the provincial and its subordinate governments, basically center the local urban system planning in its local administrative territory and take less considerations on the intra-region’s or cross-border’s development and planning for the urban system. In order to find an efficient way for pushing regional integration, the author takes the Yangtze Delta, which consists of three provincial regions, as a case study, exploring the integrating mechanism for cross-border urban system development and planning under current political and economic institutions in China.

 

Lin, Tao and Wang, Jici (Session 4.9)
Room 534, Building 2, Changchunxinyuan, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China; Email: toutostar@gmail.com
Review on regional industrial upgrading and a framework of upgrading dimensions

Literatures on regional industrial upgrading have significant theoretical implications, including industrial structure upgrading, labor division across regions, firm upgrading, cluster upgrading and so on. The practices of clusters in China indicate that industrial upgrading also involves the improvement of collective efficiency and the harmony of kinds of regional development goals. It’s strongly recommended that the theory of regional industrial upgrading needs to be reconstructed. The authors then raise a framework on upgrading dimensions, which suggests that regional industrial upgrading should be divided into three dimensions, embracing firm upgrading, cluster upgrading and regional harmony. Regional industrial upgrading means the achievement of and interaction between goals on different dimensions.

 

Lin, Wen and Ghose, Rina (Session 2.5)
Geography Department, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413,Milwaukee, WI 53201, USA
; Email: wenlin@uwm.edu

Constructing ‘e-governance’ in urban China: strategies and practices
In the past decade, ‘e-governance’ with increasing use of information technology in governmental agencies has been promoted and constructed in China, especially in its urban government. Arguing that technology use and its implications are inseparable from social, economic, and political conditions, this paper presents an attempt to examine the emergence of and transformation of ‘e-governance’ construction in China’s urban governance in the context of urban restructuring and globalization. Drawing upon literatures on scalar politics, network analysis, as well as information communication technology usage, this paper intends to provide a contextual analysis of the strategies and practice of the construction of e-governance in urban China. Through a case study in Shenzhen, it explores in what ways e-governance construction has been shaped by the scalar restructuring of urban governance in response to increasing inter-urban competition, and in turn, how the e-governance project has influenced ways of governing and managing urban spaces in China.

 

Lindberg, Lena and Alvstam, Claes (Session 4.14)

Goteborg University, P.O. Box 630 SE-40530 Goteborg, Sweden

Email: claes.alvstam@geography.gu.se

The political economy of EU-ASEAN Trade

The aim of this paper is to throw further light on how international negotiations regarding trade policy create rules and regulations for cross-border transactions of goods, services and capital. These rules constitute an essential element in the formation of the global strategy of the firm, affecting the geographical pattern of international trade and investment. The specific example taken is the relations between the European Union (EU) and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). It is demonstrated how the EU-ASEAN trade contacts are ‘squeezed’ between the multilateral arena and various forms of bilateral and regional trade arrangements.

 

Lindner, Peter (Session 2.18)

Department of Human Geography, University of Frankfurt, Robert-Mayer-Str. 6-8, 60325 Frankfurt/Main, Germany

Email: plindner@uni-frankfurt.de

East European capitalism? Property rights and stakeholder privatization in rural Russia

The unexpected results of the transformation process in Eastern Europe stimulated a general discussion on different conceptions of privatization and have led to a demand for stakeholder- instead of shareholder orientation. The paper takes this debate as a vantage point to analyze the emerging form of capitalism in rural Russia with respect to property rights, modes of their enforcement and the underlying justificatory principles. Stiglitz’ idea of ‘stakeholder privatization’ is in this perspective unveiled as an under-socialized concept which only insufficiently addresses the problems of rising disparities and inequalities.

 

Liu, Lin and Li, Yingru (Session 4.12)
Department of Geography, University of Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH 45221-0131, USA;  Email; Lin.Liu@uc.edu

Discerning competing and agglomerative effects on retail store performance: an example of Walmart and Kmart stores in Cincinnati

This study aims to analyze and explain, from a location perspective, differences in the performance of Walmart and Kmart stores in the Greater Cincinnati Area. Walmart and Kamrt, two of the largest retailers in U.S., have been developing toward two opposite directions. Wal-Mart has been growing at a phenomenal rate, while Kmart filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2002 and is still struggling to survive. This GIS-based study aims to analyze whether the different performances of Wal-Mart and Kmart are influenced by their location. A modified Huff model, taking into consideration spatial competition and agglomeration, has been developed to estimate the potential sales of individual Kmart and Wal-Mart stores. The operationalization of the competing and agglomerative effects has significantly improved the performance of the original Huff Model. Preliminary results confirm that the store location can partly explain the difference in the performance of these two store chains, with everything else being equal.

 

Lo, Lucia1` and Wang, Lu2 (Session 2.11)

1Department of Geography, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M3J 1P3, 2Department of Geography, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario, CANADA M5B 2K3

Email: lucialo@yorku.ca

Regulatory reform, retail internationalization, and Chinese consumption in transition

Economic reforms since the 1980s have dramatically altered the economic landscapes of China. Yet little attention has been paid to the changing retail and consumption topographies. Given the evolutionary nature of China’s regulatory reforms and the movement of international retail capital, the impact of change is neither spatially nor temporally uniform. Drawing upon case studies in Shanghai and Chongqing spanning over a five year period, this paper examines how changing retail structure affects the meanings and practices of shopping and consumption in contemporary China. Consumer acculturation, while both place and time dependent, is rapidly turning traditional consumption into lifestyle consumption.

 

Longhi, Christian (Session 2.20)
GREDEG, CNRS, 250 rue A. Einstein, 06560 Valbonne, France

Email: longhi@idefi.cnrs.fr

Internet and local development: from the ‘last’ to the ‘first’ kilometre
ICT have created new opportunities for local development. Internet and the generalization of broadband afford new possibilities. The paper aims to show that ICT are not driven by some uniform technological determinism, exogenous from the local economic system. On the contrary, the endogenous workings of the local system determine the nature of the impact of ICT and the internet on the local economies, and the form they take. Their developments are embedded in the existing economic, institutional, social, spatial characteristics of the territories, and they influence these characteristics in very specific ways. They will be shown to result from the interdependences of the infrastructures, the services, and the usages of the internet. The issue is thus not only a problem of access to the World Wide Web, i.e. in terms of the ‘last kilometre’, but the understanding of the nature of the Local Wide Web, i.e. the processes and services implemented in the ‘first kilometre’.

 

Ma, Li
Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Datun Road, No 11 Plus, Anwai, Beijing, China; Email: mali@igsnrr.ac.cn

Global environmental governance and its impact on local industrial transition
Given the public good and transnational emission of environmental problem, the production activity in one country could bring pollution to another country, which leads to environmental globalization. However, the effect and efficiency of environmental problem treatment are different in different countries as the result of disparities of GDP and inputs on environmental pollution. Also, there is no driving force for one country to bear the cost of another country’s actions when it formulates the policies in the field of environment treatment. Hence, it is best to build a global environmental governance framework which transcends all territory-country. In the paper, we will probe into the impact of global environmental regulation on local sustainable development, especially on the local industrial transition. Based on the review of its history and characteristics, we probe into the mechanisms of a global environmental governance framework on local sustainable development. Then, taking the UNFCCC as the case study, we study the relationship between regulation and industrial transition. With the input-output analysis and share-shifted method, we analyze the change of share of heavy energy-consumption industries and its related impact on local industrial structure.

 

Macleavy, Julie (Session 2.9)
School of Geographical Sciences, University of Bristol University Road, Bristol, BS8 1SS, UK; Email: julie.macleavy@bristol.ac.uk

Women and workfare resistance

In the US, attitudes towards welfare have progressively transformed, from a general consensus that welfare exists as a safety net for people with no or low incomes, towards a punitive approach which emphasises self-sufficiency and individual requirements to work. This change in attitudes has accompanied moves from flat-rate to graduated benefits, and from universalism to greater means testing. In response, grassroots organisations have been mobilised to build allegiances amongst the many affected groups. This paper explores the activities of groups, which have been actively organising on a broad range of welfare and labour issues, detailing strategies for articulating female experience as a catalyst for social and political change.

 

Maier, Urs and Schulz, Christian (Session 1.16)
University of Luxembourg, 162a avenue de la Faēencerie, L-1511 Luxembourg Email: urs.maier@uni.lu
Renewable energies and regional development: a research topic for economic geographers?

In recent years, various types of renewable resources have become increasingly important in Germany’s energy policy. Rural and peripheral areas in particular have recognized new forms of energy production, such as through biomass, wind, and solar power, as promising triggers for local economic development. After a brief introduction to the role of renewable energies within Germany’s regional policy, the main focus of this paper is on identifying the ways in which contemporary concepts in economic geography could be used to address relevant issues related to this political reorientation, and how its ecological and economic impacts could be evaluated.

 

Mansoori, I. K. (Session 4.2)

Jiwaji University, Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh, India

Email: ikmansoori@yahoo.com

Development of infrastructural facilities in India: a case for Madhya Pradesh state

This paper examines the development of infrastructural facilities in Madhya Pradesh state of India. This state is counted among one of the poorest states of India, while the availability of natural resources in the forms of forest, mineral, soil, and vast geographical area is enormous. The level of infrastructural facilities is not satisfactory. This paper emphasizes the need of a rational planning for development of infrastructural facilities. Data were gathered from primary and secondary sources.

 

Mao, Pascal1, Langenbach, Marc, Corneloup Jean, Oliver, Obin (Session 2.18)

1CERMOSEM – Institut de Géographie Alpine, Université Joseph Fourier, Domaine Olivier de Serres, 07 170 Mirabel, France

Email: pascal.mao@ujf-grenoble.fr

The French research about economic and territory impact of outdoor recreation

This contribution is a critical overview of French scientific research on social, economic and territory impact of outdoor recreation. Based on a bibliography of nearly 300 references, it analyses the links between different research studies and it proposes a typological approach by disciplines and study themes. This aims at understanding the diversity of the theoretical positions and their respective contributions to the study of the places of the outdoor recreation in the process of territory development. This study is financed by the French Tourism Secretary and the French Minister of sports.

 

Martinez-Fernandez, Cristina and Wu, Chung-Tong (Session 2.1)

University Western Sydney, Urban Research Centre, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith South DC, NSW 1797 Australia; Email: c.martinez@uws.edu.au

Shrinking cities in the new urban economy

The so-called new economy is characterised by footloose production systems with increased mobility of capital investment of what were once anchored industrial systems in cities and regions. The dominant paradigm to analyse this phenomenon is based on growth. In this paper, we discuss the context where shrinkage appears and focus specifically in one of the most common types of shrinkage worldwide: industrial centre shrinkage. Through the analysis of Australian case studies we discuss the potentials for this type of cities when the focus is not on expansion but on the connectivity of these urban spaces.

 

Marton, Andrew (Session 1.12)
Institute of Contemporary Chinese Studies, University of Nottingham, China House, Lenton Fields, University Park, Nottingham UK NG7 2RD, UK; Email: andrew.marton@nottingham.ac.uk

New urban formation in China’s lower Yangzi delta: functional specialisation and administrative restructuring in Kunshan

New urban formation in the lower Yangzi delta arises from strategies of functional specialisation and the substantial reconfiguration of administrative jurisdiction and space. Major shifts in the patterns of spatial economic change which have occurred since 2001 are highlighted. The paper illustrates how local strategies explicitly seek to globalise places like Kunshan in the lower Yangzi delta by directly mobilising international investment and production linkages. The findings emphasise that local forces continue to play a central role in determining the contours of new urban formation as response to, and to stimulate, accelerated global interactions and interrelationships in the lower Yangzi delta.

 

Matsubara, Hiroshi (Session 4.1)

University of Tokyo, Department of Human Geography, 3-8-1, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902, Japan

Email: matubara@humgeo.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Organizational restructuring and spatial dynamics of the manufacturing industries in Japan
The Japanese-style corporate governance system has drastically changed since the early 1990s. Leading corporation groups have been reorganized in response to the transformation of main bank relations and M&A has been aggressively utilized to survive competition in global markets. These changes in corporate organizational structures are accelerating selective plant closures and large employment decline in Japan’s local areas. Recent significant recovery in the number of locations of new plants at homeland is due to corporate strategies, such as the need to concentrate of business functions and the need to keep core technologies in ‘mother factories’.

 

McAfee, Kathleen (Session 1.11)

Department of International Relations, San Francisco State University, 2842 Delaware St. Oakland, CA 94602, USA; Email: kmcafee@sfsu.edu

Markets in environmental services: the missing link between conservation and development?
Commodification of environmental services - carbon storage, water filtration, flood control, wildlife habitats, genetic diversity, and scenic beauty - has become a leading environmental policy trend. This paper questions whether transnational environmental services markets can yield either net conservation or net equity gains. Instead, to the extent that transnational markets in ‘permits to pollute’ make it easier to avoid reduction of GHGs and other ecological damage at the source, they promote net environmental harm. Moreover, carbon sequestration, waste storage, or habitat maintenance are cheaper in global South because land rents, wages, and living standards are lower there. Thus, the pivotal premise of low-cost conservation by commercialization depends on the continuation of extreme socio-economic inequality. The discourse of global ES trading subsumes ecology within the smaller world of market economy. By leaving out the greater part of nature's meanings and uses to the world's poor majority, it radically discounts the existing and future values of ecological and eco-social production.

 

McDonald, Mary G. (Session 4.9)

Geography Department, University of Hawaii, Saunders 445, 2424 Maile Way, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA 96822; Email: mcdonald@hawaii.edu

Franchises in Asia: relations of replication

Franchise businesses proliferate rapidly in Asia today. This transformative process calls for a theory of the relations of replication, specifying means of grobalization and glocalization. This paper examines five dimensions of franchising, 1) the logics of replication as a business model, 2) franchises in property development processes, 3) the division of entrepreneurial labor, 4) the regulatory and legal environment, and 5) location in the consumer lifeworld. Franchises prove both global and local, big and small, chain and network, tree and rhizome, foreign and domestic, flexible and fixed.

 

McNeill, Donald (Session 4.13)

University of Western Sydney, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith South DC NSW 1797, Australia; Email: d.mcneill@uws.edu.au

Globalization and architectural practice

This paper examines the increasingly complex relationship between architectural design and firm organization in the US. Major US firms are increasingly adopting a self-consciously ‘global’ perspective in their operations, reflected in a series of strategic alliances, mergers, and branch office openings. Simultaneously, a small number of European firms are coming to monopolise the most prestigious civic commissions. However, each of these firms are required to carefully assess their market positioning, which is both geographical and sectoral, their organisational structure, and design leadership. This means that architecture design in the US is configured by a complex set of knowledge flows.

 

Mei, Lixia (Session 1.15)

Room 678, Changchun Garden, Peking University, Beijing, China, 100871

Email: pkumei@gmail.com

Learning by subcontracting: experience and lessons from Chinese bicycle industrial clusters

Learning is a significant way to accumulate firms’ innovation capability, while learning itself remains a black box requiring explanation. This paper tries to conceptualize learn-by-subcontracting and explains such a specific way of learning, with the case of Kunshan bicycle industrial cluster of South China. Knowledge would be classified into detailed types according to different firms’ learning ways; distinct learn-by-subcontracting patterns would be abstracted from local firms’ realities; at the same time, it proposes that subcontracting is somewhat like a patron-client relationship, or a family firm relationship, with which local suppler firms can on the one hand get help from big buyers, yet on the other, they have to obey and not infract the latter’s kernel interests. In the end, experience and lessons, as well as innovation-orientated policy implication would be discussed for business managers and policy makers. The research methodology is a case study based on in-depth interviews with managers of about twenty subcontracting firms, system integration firms, and a few local government officers in the Kunshan bicycle industrial cluster.

 

Meyer, David (Session 1.13)
Brown University,
625 South Skinker, Apt. 1001 St. Louis, MO 63105-2346 USA; Email: David_Meyer@Brown.edu
The global job mobility networks of Asian financial firms
Because Hong Kong is the premier business center for Asia, its job mobility networks reach globally. Thus, when top international financial firms in Hong Kong recruit, they draw on a talent pool that reaches to other global business centers. Most of the financiers recruited from outside Asia come from a small number of global centers such as London and New York City. However, when firms recruit from within Asia, the individuals typically come from a few top Asian centers, primarily Singapore, and, occasionally, Shanghai. Financiers increasingly move among firms, without regard to global headquarters cities or national origins.

 

Mishina, Natalya V. (Session 1.16)

Pacific Institute of Geography, Far Eastern Branch of Russian Academy of sciences (FEB RAS) Radio St. 7, Vladivostok, 690041, Russia

Email: mishina@tig.dvo.ru

The influence of international trade on the land use structure: the case study of the Amur River basin

The Amur River basin has transboundary characteristics. Its watershed includes portions of China, Russia and Mongolia. Present-day transformations of the natural environment and land use structure of Amur River basin is mostly determined by economic activity of humans. In this paper, international trade among China, Russia and Japan is considered as the driving force of land-use changes inside the transboundary basin. Trade effects on resources utilization were studied for several periods and on the different spatial levels of countries and their separate administrative units.

 


Miyamachi, Yoshihiro (Session 4.20)

Faculty of Economics, University of Oita, 700 Dannoharu, Oita 870-1192 Japan; Email: ymiya@cc.oita-u.ac.jp

The sogo shosha revisited: 'glocalization' of the Japanese general trading companies

The Japanese sogo shosha are one of the most globalized companies in terms of their extensive network of offices and subsidiaries across the world. They, however, need to become more firmly embedded within the local economy in order to extend their business. This paper takes the Japanese sogo shosha as an example and explores how they overcome a dilemma in business between global integration and local orientation.

 

Mizuoka, Fujio (Session 2.2)

Division of Economic Geography, Graduate School of Economics, Hitotsubashi University, Tokyo 186-8601, Japan

Email: fmizuoka@econgeog.misc.hit-u.ac.jp

Contrived laissez-faireism in Hong Kong under the British colonial rule
Neo-liberalism requires a political apparatus, which can steer the direction of competition to achieve its policy aim. The British colonial administration of Hong Kong subtly, yet deliberately prepared the stage for the harsh competition, by manipulating policy variables to create scarcity in order to pit the Chinese against one another to sustain the colonial regime. The crucial variables included space, which the British was the sole owner, manipulation of border porosity and number of places in higher education. The structure, which could be termed 'contrived laissez-faireism', has its origin in the administration of British Empire. Neo-liberalism is thus not a manifestation of freedom, but a way in which those dominate strengthen its grip on the subjugated.

 

Moisio, Sami (Session 2.2)
Department of Geography, University of Turku, Finland, 20014 TURKU, Finland; Email: samimo@utu.fi
Making European space: EU projects, governmental visuality and intellectual irony

This paper seeks to contribute to the debate on the space making at the European level. By leaning on both personal observations and material produced by the EU Commission the paper especially focuses on ‘the EU project space’ as an example on how the idea of Europe of meta-regions is spatially circulated by the Commission of the EU in its continuing efforts to increase intellectual and economic mobility within the Union. The paper aims to conceptualize the construction of the new transnational meta-regions from two perspectives. The EU project space is first approached through the concept of governmental visuality, the visualization of the supranational political body. Secondly, the EU project space is interpreted as a form of intellectual irony. The paper concludes that these two dimensions of the EU project space highlight the complexity and ambiguity of actorness in the political construction of the EU territoriality.

 

Monk, Ashby (Session 1.1)
Christ Church, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 1DP, UK

Email: ashby.monk@chch.ox.ac.uk
Government financed health care: a competitive advantage for Canadian manufacturers?

While there are many factors that contribute to the competitiveness Canadian firms, government financed health care is increasingly cited as being an important component. Indeed, for many US manufacturing firms the financing of health benefits has become a salient issue, as 'legacy costs' in the form of health care liabilities appear to be constraining corporate competitiveness in the global marketplace. Through an examination of firms' investment decisions, I intend to evaluate claims that the publicly financed health care system encourages firm location in Canada. Indeed, I hope to contribute to our understanding of how the structure and financing of health systems impacts and potentially alters the location decision of transnational corporations

Mukhopadhyay, Tapati (Session 1.2)

Siddharth College of Arts, Science & Commerce, Park Side – III, C/1308, Raheja Estate, Kulupwadi Road, Borivali (East), Mumbai – 400 066

Email: mukhopadhyay_tapati@rediffmail.com

Economic reform process and its impact on urban space and economy: an Indo-Chinese comparison

Economic reforms in China began in 1979 with the introduction of market - friendly economic reforms for establishing a ‘socialist market economy’ in China. India also introduced market – oriented reforms since 1991-92, albeit under a totally different background. Though there is a time lag in the process of implementation of reform between India and China, a sweeping change can be seen in the urban landscape due to the internal shift of population, shift of capital, changes in employment structure, and the emergence of foreign companies within urban areas. Since both are Asian countries, having many similarities and dissimilarities, the present paper envisages to take an assessment of the process of reforms in urban space and employment, with special reference to Shenzhen and Guangzhou (where the reform process were initiated) in China and Mumbai in India. With these case studies, it is expected that changes through the process of reforms in the space and economy would be quantified and comparative features between India and China would be derived. The study is based largely on secondary data, obtained from the Statistical Year Book of China. Data for Mumbai have been obtained from the Census reports of India and reports published by MMRDA. Data are classified both inter - urban and intra - urban levels and presented in graphical form. The spatial changes, which have emerged in the post reform period in Guangzhou, Shenzhen and Mumbai are also shown in maps prepared by applying GIS techniques and remotely sensed data.

 

Murphy, James (Session 4.8)

Clark University – Graduate School of Geography, 950 Main Street, Worcester, MA 01610 USA; Email: jammurphy@clarku.edu

South-South trade and investment relations: new geographies of production, innovation, and consumption?
‘South-South’ trade and investment relations have become increasingly significant in the global economy. Led by firms from countries such as China, India, South Africa, and Brazil, economic links between Southern economies may be fostering new kinds of industrial relationships, institutions, knowledge flows, and innovations. Despite their significance, we know little about these relationships, particularly
whether or not they might offer viable alternatives for regional development, upgrading, and global market integration in the Global South. This paper examines developments in South-South relations, assesses the utility of extant theories for understanding these ties, and frames a research agenda for future studies.

 

Murray, Michael (Session 1.12)
Institute of Spatial and Environmental Planning, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, BT9 5AG, Northern Ireland, UK

Email: m.r.murray@qub.ac.uk

Principles for strategic spatial planning and development: a critique of the Irish experience

Within Europe strategic spatial planning at multiple scales is emerging as a key driver of economic development. This is seeking to shape new spatial relationships, forge closer connections between spatial and sectoral development, facilitate environmental sustainability and create innovative governance alliances related to implementation, not least public sector expenditure. The paper focuses on the comparative experience of the Regional Development Strategy for Northern Ireland and the National Spatial Strategy for the Republic of Ireland. It examines the background to strategy formation, critically reviews the scope of strategy content, and assesses the initial contribution made to the establishment of new development trajectories within and across the two jurisdictions. Key planning principles with wider application are gleaned from this analysis.

 

Musson, Steven (Session 1.8)

Department of Geography, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading RG6 6AB, UK; Email: S.Musson@reading.ac.uk

Private finance / public service: the economic geography of PFI

The Private Finance Initiative (or PFI) is a form of public-private partnership that was developed in the United Kingdom in the early 1990s. Over the last decade, PFI has been integral to New Labour's plans for the renewal of public services. Initially the preserve of central government departments, PFI has been rolled out across all areas of government,

including local authorities and primary care trusts. Total investment under PFI exceeds £40billion since 1992. Although this is a relatively small sum in the context of overall public expenditure, the geography of PFI is highly uneven. This paper seeks to understand the geography of PFI. Historical and contemporary processes that influence this geography are considered, in particular previous rounds of public finance reform, including Compulsory Competitive Tendering. This leads to two conclusions. First, it is argued that accounts of national political projects such as PFI underestimate the capacity of local government to dissent and to find alternative forms of funding. Second, it is argued that public policy can only really be understood as a locally specific process, in which meta-level strategies are interpreted, adapted and applied in a wide range of often unexpected ways.

 

Nahm, Kee-Bom (Session 4.1)

Department of Urban Sociology, The University of Seoul, Department of Urban Sociology, The University of Seoul, South Korea

Email: nahm@uos.ac.kr

The interplay between cyber space and urban space: tentative model and its implications
As the use of ICT has deepen in everyday life space, the boundary between real space and cyber space has become blurred. This paper tried to analyze the differential impacts of cyber space on urban economic space. Based on the concept of co-evolution between on-and-off line economic spaces, it proposed the six effects: Synergy effects, Substitution effects, Generation effects, Enhancement effects, Inertia effects, Alienation effects. After analyzing web-based survey data, it concluded that the development of new ICT infrastructure has been asymmetrical and power-related processes. Moreover, utilizing cyber space has accelerated the polarization process in the real economic space.

 

Neo, Harvey (Session 4.19)
1 Arts Link, Department of Geography, National University of Singapore Singapore 117570; Email: harveyneo@nus.edu.sg

Politics, profits and purity: the restructuring Malaysian pig industry
The pig industry in Malaysia is unique as it is controlled by ethnic Chinese in a purportedly Islamic country. While the industry has faced several past and existing problems, it is argued that increasing religiosity in Malaysia is the biggest, most complex challenge that needs to be resolved. To better its chances of survival, the industry needs to, among other things, push for both greater clarity in regulation and for the establishment of legally-designated pig farming areas. However, the success of these initiatives depends on the prevailing debate on, and the use of, religion in contemporary Malaysia.

 

Ng, Raye (Session 4.13)
University of Liverpool, Department of Geography, Roxby Building, Liverpool, L69 7ZT, UK; Email: raye@liv.ac.uk

Contemporary Chinese capitalism in practice: case study of the Lion City

This paper addresses the notion of contemporary Chinese capitalism as a hybrid capitalism in practice. Using recent empirical evidence in a predominantly Chinese society, I illustrate how social networks, business networks and corporate culture reflect the dynamism of contemporary Chinese capitalism.

 

Nguyen, Khac Anh and Nguyen, Thi Bich Phuong (Session 1.2)

Faculty of Geography, Hanoi National University of Education, 136 Xuan Thuy Road, Cau Giay Distric, Hanoi, Vietnam
Email: khacanhhnpu@yahoo.com.sg

Building scientific ground for Khanh Hoa coastal zone development strategy

Khanh Hoa coastal zone, which is occupied in 52% of its total area, concentrates much socio-economic value and is a great power area for the development of this province. Building a development strategy for the Khanh Hoa coastal zone not only has important significance to Khanh Hoa Province, but also has a positive effect on the Central Coasts of Vietnam. The aim of our research, with the title ‘Building scientific ground for Khanh Hoa coastal zone development strategy’ was to seek for a methodology for forming nuclear-urban network. It also was one of the strategies for organizing of socio-economic territory in Khanh Hoa costal zone. This research also examines the motive for coastal area development, which is to enhance inner productive capacity and greater supply capacity of input factors. The velocity of the inner transfer of zone specialization and socio-labor assignment were considered as a power supply for area development.

Nguyen, Minh Ngoc (Session 2.9)

Hanoi National University of Education, 406/5 Lane 68 Nguyen Hong Street, Dong Da District, Hanoi, Vietnam; Email: ngocnmw@yahoo.com

The different roles and status of women in fishing families in Khanh Hoa, Vietnam

The important role of Vietnamese women in their society has long been understood and acknowledged, however gender equality is still an issue in some rural areas. This article highlights the difference between status and role of women by showing how some women from fishing households in Khanh Hoa coastal villages are being treated. The article also analyses possible reasons why gender inequality still exists in this particular area.

 

Ni, Pengfei (Session 2.1)
Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, 2 Yuetan Beixiaojiao St, Beijing 100836 China; Email: zgcsjzl@163.com
Research on the global urban competitiveness
Urban competitiveness mainly refers to a city’s abilities to faster create more and better wealth with fewer resources than other cities and to provide welfare for its inhabitants in the course of competition and development. According to the definition, long-term overall economic growth rate, comprehensive market share, comprehensive GDP per square of land, and general per capita income may synthetically indicate a city’s overall competitiveness. In this paper, relevant data of 110 global cities are utilized for calculating overall competitiveness. We find that some cities’ competitiveness is stronger in North American and European than other regions, but the growth of some cities’ competitiveness is faster in Asia than other regions.

 

Nikolaevich, Ryanskiy Feliks, Mihailovna, Ryanskaya Elvira and Feliksovich, Ryanskiy Arseniy

Nizhnevartovsk State Humanitarian University, Russia, Tjumenskaya region, Nizhnevartovsk town, Dzerjinskiy Street, 11, 628615, Russia

Email: arseny@intramail.ru

Terranomy and ethic-cognitive approach to division into districts of all levels from state up to municipal

The new scientific direction - terranomy - is a wider concept and qualitatively distinguished from the traditional economy. The economy operates with cost expressions of the material and other values expressed, as a rule, in the monetary form. Terranomy operates with real values: ground resources, mineral and other natural resources and conditions (climate, relief etc.), as a rule, having absolute biological value for animals, plants and the person; the human resources also have very complex social, ethnic, cultural and others non-cost structure. Non-cost structures are inadequately taken into account or in general are ignored in global financial systems. To us, the development of approaches, ways and the mechanism of terranomy at a regional level is represented today as the most accurate.

 

Nobuoka, Jakob (Session 2.4)
Department of Social and Economic Geography, Uppsala University, BOX 513, SE-751 20 Uppsala Sweden
Email: jakob.nobuoka@kultgeog.uu.se
User-led innovation and Japanese culture industries

The Japanese cultural industries are a rapidly growing export and sector of the economy. Japanese cultural industries are relatively unique in the diversity and scale of products and media they have as outputs. This presentation discusses these industries from a user-perspective by examining the case of Akihabara in Tokyo. Akihabara is a central place for the organization and production of Japanese cultural industries. However, its dynamics are based as much on user-led innovation and cultural dynamics as on inter-firm linkages. The paper argues that research on innovation milieus must take account of the role of users and consumers.

 

Norcliffe, Glen (Session 4.15)
Department of Geography York University 4700 Keele Street Toronto Ontario M3J 1P3 Canada; Email: gnorclif@yorku.ca
The state, institutions, and supply networks: the case of the Canadian bicycle industry

The international supply relations of the Canadian bicycle industry are examined at two contrasting historical moments, first during in the industry’s formative years, and second in the current neoliberal age. The formative years coincided with an era of industrial protectionism under Canada’s ‘National Policy’ when the industry was launched by importing many parts and attaching Canadian brand names to the machines. The declining years of the Canadian cycle industry correspond with the age of neoliberalism, as protective tariffs have been reduced, and Canadian producers exposed to competition from low-cost Asian producers who have captured much of the mass market. The remaining Canadian makers import many parts from East Asia, and are attempting to move up-market. The state and various institutions - notably the leading cycle trade shows - play an active role in the negotiation of these new supply networks.

 


Novotny, Josef and Nosek, Vojtech (Session 2.12)
Dept. of Social Geography and Regional Development, Charles University, Albertov 6, 12843, Praha 2, Czech Republic; Email: pepino@natur.cuni.cz

Regional dimension of socioeconomic inequality in the Czech Republic

The paper analyzes the development of socioeconomic inequality in the Czech Republic during the period of post-communist transformation focusing on the regional dimension of inequality. We assess the general direction of regional development (i.e. of regional disparities). In addition, we employ the method of spatial decomposition of (income and pay) inequality in order to explore the development of the relative extent of inequality attributable to between-region differences. We state the increasing importance of the between-region component on overall inequality and discuss potential determinants as well as some mechanisms of the inequality regulation.

 

O'Neill, Phillip (Session 1.8)
Urban Research Centre, University of Western Sydney, Parramatta Campus, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith South DC NSW 1797, Australia
Email: p.oneill@uws.edu.au
Infrastructure financing and operation in the contemporary urban economy

The paper presents an overview of approaches to infrastructure financing, delivery, management and control via a case study of the contemporary Australian economy with a particular emphasis on Sydney. The 'Macquarie Bank model' is analysed with attention drawn to sources of finance, relationships with governments, the nature of EVA involved and corporate strategy. Other models are contrasted. Implications for the nature and direction or urban economy are drawn.

 

Oh, Chung Weon (Session 1.9)
Dept. of GIS Eng. 21 Maejuri_SungHwanup Chunansi, Chung Nam, South Korea; Email: ohrora@nsu.ac.kr

Integration of geographic modelling with space syntax

Space Syntax theory is a method for measuring the relative accessibility of different locations in a spatial system. It has provided a configurational description of an urban structure, and attempts to explain human behaviors and social activities from a spatial configuration point of view. Space Syntax theory could provide an alternative spatial model for the representation of urban systems within Geography. So, integration of Space Syntax into Geographic Modeling which would stimulate researches about spatial analysis. The purpose of this study is to investigate how to integrate geographic modeling with Space Syntax theory for Spatial Structure analysis.

 

Ohdedar, Chandrani (Session 2.4)

302 Walker Building, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802. USA; Email: chandrani@psu.edu

Tacit knowledge and quality of work in voice-interactive services: a case study of call centers in India

Increasing global competition has made it imperative to provide high quality work at a low cost. Off-shored voice-interactive services are increasingly facing this challenge. An ethnographic study of call center agents in India explores the process of improving the quality of work over time among the agents. The study concludes that tacit knowledge is vital for skill development and consequently enables the agents to engage in more value-added voice-interactive work. However, certain characteristics of the labor processes within a call center often act as impediments to the effective translation of tacit knowledge into higher quality of services.

 

Olds, Kris1 and Robertson, Susan2 (Session 4.4)
1University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA, 2University of Bristol, UK

Email: kolds@wisc.edu

‘Clusters’, hubs’, ‘hotspots’ and ‘networks’: a case of fashionable discourse or a new geography of global knowledge production for higher education?
In this paper we review a wide variety of new and innovative discourses and practices that have emerged in the higher education sectors of national and regional (esp., Asia, Europe & North America) economies intended to strategically construct and promote competitive knowledge-based economies. These discourses, such as knowledge clusters, hubs, hotspots, and networks offer alternative and arguably more useful metaphors for thinking about the changing geometries of universities in the 21st century. The question at the heart of this paper is whether this increasingly fashionable discourse offers a more acute reading of changing knowledge/power relations within, between and across universities, states and industries, and has the capacity to shed light on which knowledges are promoted or excluded, locally, regionally and globally.

 

Onsager, Knut1, Wiig Aslesen, Heidi2, Isaksen, Arne3 and Langeland, Ove4 (Session 1.5)

1Norwegian Institute for Urban Research, 2NIFU STEP, Wergelandsveien 7, No- 0167, Norway, 3Agder University College, 4Norwergian Institute for Urban and Regional Research; Email: knut.onsager@nibr.no
City-regions, knowledge bases and regional advantages

Modern economies are denoted as knowledge-based and innovation driven economies in which city-regions are assumed to play a central role in enhancing innovation performance and national competitiveness. A striking aspect of the knowledge economy is that economic activity and growth seem to become more spatially concentrated and increasingly city-based. Based on the project ‘City-regions, knowledge bases and innovation support systems’ (2006-2009), the paper presents and discusses some of these theoretical approaches and concepts, tests some of the concepts on empirical material from Norwegian city-regions, and present some preliminary findings. The project will carry out comparative analyses of 10-12 knowledge intensive agglomerations located in small, medium and large city-regions of Norway in order to illuminate similarities and specificities of their regional advantages and development challenges. A revised theoretical framework and empirical evidence will then be used to develop new perspectives on local and regional innovation policy, and in particular discuss how policy tools can be adjusted to varying regional conditions.

 

Pan, Fenghua
Room 344, Building 26, Peking University, Beijing, China, 100871

Email: pfhpku@163.com

Spatial impacts of agglomeration externalities: evidence from China

Using county-level 3-dig industry data of 1996 and 2001 from Zhejiang province in China, this study tries to understand the spatial patterns and the evolutions of patterns of manufacturing distribution. Then, this research examines the extent to which spatial impacts affect employment growth by applying techniques of spatial econometrics. The dynamic production externalities are tested at both county and prefecture levels in Zhejiang province. As a significant improvement, this research introduces the variables reflecting the industry structure into the model.

 

Park, Bae-Gyoon1 and Choi, Young-Jin (Session 1.3)

1Dept. of Geography Education, Seoul National University San 56-1 Sillim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-748, South Korea

Email: geopbg@snu.ac.kr
Pursuing either nationalism or economic democratization: mixed responses of the Korean social movements to globalization

This paper addresses the ways in which the Korean social movements have responded to globalization and neoliberalization. Unlike what has been widely expected, the responses from the Korean social movements to globalization have been much more mixed and complex than something simply dominated by nationalist resistance against global neoliberalism. The Korean social movements have responded to globalization in contrasting ways. This paper aims to explain this mixed picture of the Korean social movements in the era of globalization by examining how the two contrasting responses have been differentially associated with, and influenced by, two important ideological tendencies that serve as the basis for their mobilization of support: 1) nationalism and 2) a strong orientation toward democratization. The main argument suggested in this paper is that different groups in the Korean social movements have been oriented towards one or the other of these two ideological traditions, so that the Korean social movements have been unable to contribute to the construction of successful transnational resistance practices against neoliberal globalization.

 

Park, Sam Ock (Session 2.7)

Department of Geography, College of Social Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-746, South Korea; Email: parkso@snu.ac.kr

Dynamics of socio-economic spaces in the aging society

Most important characteristics of socio-economic spaces in the global society, especially in the developed economies, are related with progress of globalization, knowledge-based information society, aging society, and service world. This paper aims to develop some notions of dynamics of socio-economic spaces in the aging society. Local vs. global networks, spatial cluster vs. virtual cluster, regional innovation systems vs. spatial division of labor and hierarchy of networks of economic activities are reviewed with regard to the dynamics of socio-economic spaces. Some empirical cases are analyzed in the core and peripheral areas of Korea.

 

Park, Sang-Chul1 and Lee, Sang-Chun2 (Session 2.4)
1Graduate School of Knowledge-based Technology and Energy, Korea Polytechnic University, 2121, Jeongwang-Dong, Siheung-Si, Gyeonggi-Do, 429-793, Korea, 2Changwon Cluster Development Agency 851-1 Oe-dong, Gyeongsangnam-do, South Korea 641-020; Email: scpark86@hotmail.net

The strategy for innovative cluster in Changwon industrial complex, South Korea

The South Korean GDP per capita increased from 80 US dollars in 1960 up to 18,970 US dollars in 2006 that contributed to becoming 11th largest economy in the world. In order to develop the nation as rapidly as possible, the government built several large-sized industrial complexes at the national level and small and medium sized industrial complexes at the regional level in the 1970s. In line with the central government policy, Changwon Industrial Complex was initiated in 1974 in order to develop the machine industry. As a result, 1,294 companies are operating, and over 73,000 employments are created in 2006. The average annual growth rate accounted for 9% during the 1990s. The complex is extremely competitive in hardware sectors such as infrastructure, manufacturing etc. Yet, it has a weakness in the area of software sector such as R & D, industrial design etc. Such an internal weakness limits the further development of the complex and refrains from creating high value added productivity. The paper argues that how the national development strategy has changed particularly in the advanced nations with the globalization process and why the Changwon Industrial Complex has to rearrange its development strategy to focus on innovative cluster enabling a convergence of high technologies.

 

Park, Won Seok (Session 1.13)
Daegu University, Dept. of Real Estate, 15 naeri, Jinryang, Gyeonsan City, Greongbuk Province, South Korea, 712-714

Email: wspark@daegu.ac.kr
Regional differences of project finance in Korea
The aim of this study is to examine the existence and characteristics of regional differences of project finance in Korea. Project financing has been mainly used in the real estate development and SOC projects since 1990s in Korea. The main results are as follows. The partial differences of financing conditions between the projects developed in capital region and local areas are appeared. Especially, local projects paid more excess interest rate than capital region projects in the commercial real estate developments. This is caused by the asymmetric information of evaluating a project’s risks and returns between capital region and local area.

 

Patil, Arun Annasaheb (Session 2.24)
Head, Department of Geography, Mahavir Mahavidyalaya,7/E, Vaishali Parisar, Bhausingaji Road, KOLHAPUR-416 003. (Maharashtra State), India; Email: arun_patilmmk@yahoo.co.in
The economic assessment of rural energy programmes based on renewable energy of Maharashtra (state) Energy Development Agency (MEDA)

The Oil Slick of 1970 prompted energy planners the world over to look for alternative sources of energy. Proper utilization of renewable energy such as solar, biogas, bio-mass, wind once again stated capturing the imagination of mankind. The Government of India set up an example, as one of the few countries that created independent ministry for renewable energy, the Ministry of Non-conventional Energy Sources in the early 1980s.

Likewise Maharashtra State created Maharashtra Energy Development Agency (MEDA) in 1986. MEDA’s objective is to undertake development of renewable energy and facilitate energy conservation in Maharashtra. The Agency did extensive work in the field of renewable energy focusing on rural areas. Integrated rural energy planning programme is its main activity. In this paper, the attempt is made to evaluate the work done by MEDA during last 20 years in the sector of renewable energy and thereby changing the rural resource economies.

 

Peck, Jamie and Theodore, Nik (Session 2.6)

University of Wisconsin-Madison and Urban Planning and Policy (UPP) Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago, USA

Email: japeck@wisc.edu

Variegated capitalism

The paper critically engages with the ‘varieties of capitalism’ school, which since its origins in the early 1990s has been consolidated into one of the most influential strands in comparative and heterodox political economy. While the ‘varieties’ approach can be credited with the development of several of the most evocative stylized facts in heterodox political economy, having served as a potent foil against the orthodox globalization thesis, its alternative vision of a bipolar global economy comprising two competing capitalisms is found to be wanting. The approach is limited by its methodological nationalism, a tendency towards static analysis and latent institutional functionalism, and by an inability to adequately balance national specificity and path-dependency on the one hand with common underlying tendencies in capitalist restructuring on the other. Nevertheless, the varieties approach has spawned an influential account of the spatiality of advanced capitalism from which economic geography can certainly learn, and to which it has much to contribute.

 

Perry, Martin and Sun, Zhenming (Session 4.15)

Department of Management & Enterprise Development, Massey University Wellington, Private Box 756, Wellington, New Zealand

Email: m.perry@massey.ac.nz

The role of trading cities in the development of Chinese business clusters

It is common to find one or more purpose designed wholesale markets attached to business clusters in China. The contribution of these markets to emergence and development of business clusters is a unique Chinese phenomenon that has so far had little investigation. China, as with other low income countries is challenged to obtain a sustainable position within global value chains. Developing trading cities within clusters is one strategy attempting to strengthen the position of Chinese producers in consumer industries dominated by value chains controlled by high income country buyers. This paper draws on existing literature to examine trading cities linked to a number of different business clusters. These markets are either embedded within an individual cluster or established to service multiple clusters. Through six-case studies, it shows that these markets can become information platforms, marketing centres and distribution centres for promoting clusters into a higher status within global value or national chains. Trading cities also drive the development of downstream industries. Alongside these benefits, the paper identifies problems arising from the establishment of trading cities including the level of support from producers.

 

Phelps, Nicholas1, Power, M.2 and Wanjiru, R.3 (Session 2.22)

1Bartlett School of Planning, University College London, Wates House, 22 Gordon Street London WC1H OQB, UK, 2Department of Geography, University of Durham and 3School of Geography, University of Leeds.

Email: n.phelps@ucl.ac.uk

Learning to compete: communities of investment promotion practice in the spread of global neoliberalism

In this paper we focus on the question of how nations currently are learning to compete for foreign direct investment (FDI). Our research draws upon interviews conducted between 2002 and 2004 with staff from national investment promotion agencies (IPAs) investment promotion arms of international organisations (IOs), and from consulting firms (with a specific focus on East Africa and East Asia). We begin by situating the competition for FDI and the growth of an IP community of practice within historical shifts in the liberal state model. We then go on to make three arguments regarding the contribution of such a community to the spread of neoliberal competition for capital. We then go on to illustrate these arguments with regard to IP practices in Southeast Asia and Africa. Finally, in concluding discussion we consider the issue of how to conceptualise the contribution of IP practices to processes of neoliberalisation.

 

Poon, Jessie and Sajarattanachote, Suksawat (Session 2.15)

University at Buffalo-SUNY, Buffalo, New York 14261, USA

Email: jesspoon@buffalo.edu

Foreign multinationals and agglomeration economies in Thailand

Much of the evidence supporting the advantages of agglomeration economies in the form of regional spillovers has originated from industrialized and industrializing economies. In contrast, we examine the nature of regional spillover effects in the context of a developing economy, namely Thailand. Long noted for its extreme level of urban agglomeration, the advantages of industrial concentration in Thailand’s capital city Bangkok have not been clear. We focus on the manufacturing activities of foreign multinational enterprises (MNEs) and compare the differences in regional spillover effects between Japanese and non-Japanese MNEs based on a survey that was carried out in 2005.

 


Pope, Naomi (Session 4.1)
Department of Geography, University of Victoria, PO BOX 3050 STN CSC, Victoria, B.C., V8W 3P5, Canada; Email: npope@uvic.ca
The international division of talent in the motion picture industry

In recent years the motion picture industry has been experiencing a decentralization process from Hollywood to more dispersed production locations such as Australia and Canada. This spatial trend in motion picture production has been underway for several years, and these new production locations are undergoing changes which are dramatically evidenced in the dynamics of the local labour market. It is normally crew talent (‘below-the-line’ occupations) that are contracted to work on these foreign productions, yet increasingly the more creative talent (‘above-the-line’ occupations) in each new production location are playing an increasingly central role in the production process. Through a survey of ‘above-the-line’ labour working on foreign productions in Australia and Canada, the advantages and disadvantages of working on these foreign creative projects are brought to light. This research highlights the international connectivity and mobility of specialized talent pools in the motion picture industry and presents the findings to inform regional economic development policy.

 

Pow, Choon Piew (Session 4.13)
1 Arts Link, Department of Geography, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, National University of Singapore Singapore 117570
Email: geopowcp@nus.edu.sg
Neoliberalism and the aestheticization of new middle-class landscapes in post-socialist Shanghai

The proliferation of ‘neoliberal’ forms of urban development such as ‘gated communities’ has drawn widespread contention amongst urban scholars. Research on gated communities however generally neglects the cultural dimensions of neoliberal forces at work. Using Shanghai's commodity housing enclaves as a case study, this paper examines the role of aesthetics in the politics of exclusion and urban segregation. To this extent, a central objective of the paper is to examine how the aestheticization of urban paces has become increasingly intertwined with and accentuated by neoliberal ideologies and exclusionary practices in the city.

 


Prince, Russell (Session 2.8)

Department of Geography, University of Bristol, University Road, Bristol, BS8 1SS, UK; Email: Russell.Prince@bristol.ac.uk

The birth of a discipline? The creative industries and the intersection of policy and economic knowledge

Worldwide, many university faculties have incorporated the creative industries into their programmes if not their departmental designations. This paper will explore how this came about given that this particular sectorisation of the economy was first conducted not in the name of academic research but by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport in 1998 in the service of New Labour in the UK. The popularity of this idea amongst government administrations at all levels around the world has coincided with a growing research focus on the sector. The dynamics of this nascent disciplinarisation will be examined in terms of the interface of power and knowledge and of the political and academic spheres.

 

Pritchard, Bill and Neilson, Jeffery (Session 4.7)
School of Geosciences, University of Sydney NSW 2006 Australia
Email: b.pritchard@geosci.usyd.edu.au
Value chain struggles: compliance and defiance in the plantation districts of South India

Economic and political struggles over the future of the tea and coffee plantation districts of south India provide an empirical lens into the question of how regional production systems are (re-)integrated into the global economy. In this production system there is a complex geographical mosaic of winners and losers. We explain these spatial outcomes using a hybridized Global Value Chain-institutional perspective which brings into focus the negotiations and struggles created as production systems embedded in socio-spatial contexts interact with GVC governance systems. This approach provides an analytical framework which conceptually accommodates the routine production of differentiated economic landscapes, accounts for global processes in terms of political struggle, and makes a practical contribution to the question of how to explain the development dilemmas of tropical producers.

 

Qiao, Jiajun and Li, Xiaojian (Session 2.18)
Key Research Institute of Yellow River Civilization and Sustainable Development Henan University; College of Environment & Planning; Henan, Kaifeng, 475001, China; Email: jjqiao@henu.edu.cn
Types and changes of village-level economy since the 1990s: a case of Gongyi city in Henan province

Based on the different standards of living and the reality of economy development in Henan province, this paper defines the borders of farmers’ living levels and, hereby, classifies them into six types: to be extremely poor, to make a living, to dress warmly and eat one's fill, to try to enrich, to be well-off, to be affluent. The development experience of society and economy of 282 villages in Gongyi city Henan province since 1990s has been reviewed, then the paper points out: (1) general differences among these villages take on a trend of enlargement, and relative differences among them fluctuating during the period; (2) the development of village-level economy makes the village’s development type become increasingly complicated; (3) of spatial distribution of these 282 villages, villages of ‘to reach affluence’ mainly located around the urban district, villages of ‘to be well-off’ and ‘to reach affluence’ form ‘core-periphery’ structure pattern, and these villages of ‘to dress warmly and eat one's fill’, and those that are below the type, are almost always located in mountainous areas with inconvenient traffic; (4) looking from its change, initial economic foundations, near to the urban district, and the driving of Industry parks bringing a strong effect on its spatial evolution.

Rahnemai, Mahamad Taghi (Session 1.9)

Faculty of Geography, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran

Email: rahnemai1323@yahoo.com

The role of higher education in centralization of Tehran

When Tehran became the capital of Iran in 1889, it had about 15000 inhabitants and covered ea. 8.5 km2. Based on recent national census in 2006, the national metropole Tehran in its 22 urban district has more than 8 million inhabitants within an area of 830 km2. The reasons for the rapid growth and extension of Tehran are as follows: administrative centralization, industrial centralization, business and banking, and transportation and communication. One of the most important factors of centralization in Tehran is the concentration of universities and higher education centers. There are 17 universities and more than 30 higher education centers with 315000 students in Tehran which account for 26% of total students in Iran. The consequences of this concentration are as follows: housing problems, increasing usage of public services, increasing consumption, traffic problems, and recreational problems. This paper is going to survey the above problems from an urban geographical point of view.

 


Rantisi, Norma (Session 1.15)

Department of Geography, Planning and Environment, Concordia University, 1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. West, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1M8 Canada; Email: nrantisi@alcor.concordia.ca

Local innovative dynamics and the global fashion city phenomenon: Montréal’s missing link

This paper engages with current debates on the local and global foundations of innovative dynamism through a comparison of the New York and Montréal fashion design innovation systems. It suggests that key marketing and distribution intermediaries centered in New York serve as locally situated ‘global pipelines’, enabling designers to tap into global networks and knowledge flows. In the case of Montréal, however, a disconnect between local designers and distributors, as well as a truncated marketing infrastructure, limits the ability of designers to access non-local networks or knowledge pools and poses challenges for long-term viability in an increasingly global economy.

 

Ramachandraiah, C. (Session 2.11)
Centre for Regional Studies, School of Social Sciences, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad - 500046, India; Email: crchandraiah@gmail.com

Emergence and management of high-tech parks: experiences from Hyderabad, India

Growth of information technology (IT) sector in Hyderabad led to the setting up of a 150-acre ‘HITEC City’ and demarcation of a 52 km2 area as Cyberabad, which incorporates the former. Several IT parks came up in Cyberabad. The Andhra Pradesh Industrial Infrastructure Corporation (APIIC) and Cyberabad Development Authority collect certain taxes/fees from the high-tech parks and pass on some portion of it to the local bodies. The provision of basic amenities is done by other agencies. The present paper analyses the policies relating to the setting up and maintenance of high-tech parks and the roles of multiple agencies in Hyderabad.

 

Ramezani, Bahman and Shirzad, Farzad (Session 1.6)
Department of Geography-Islamic Azad University, Rasht branch-Guilan, Iran; Email: bahmanr2000@yahoo.com

Drought and its ecological effects in central area of Gilan –southwestern of Caspian Sea

We compared the changing precipitation (drought) with growth of tree rings index (TRI) in the central of Gilan at a statistical period (1995-2003). The research method this paper is field work, using cut wood and the capture of wood disk and preparation in the laboratory and counting of TRI yearly with comparing the precipitation rate at the same time (annual, monthly) with a correlation method. Results of this research showed that drought or a deficit of rain has a direct relationship with growth tree ring index ((TRI) diameter increment in (Populus Deltoids) Poplar trees and suggests that with irrigation and time, the risk of destruction would be lowered.

 

Ratajczak, Waldemar (Session 1.4)

Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland, Institute of Socio-economic Geography and Spatial Management, 27 Dzięgielowa Street, 61-680 Poznań, Poland; Email: walrat@amu.edu.pl

Fractal modelling in socio-economic geography
Fractals open up new possibilities, so far unavailable, of exploring the real world and its dynamics. They provide a new language of experimental geometry in modelling the various complexities of nature. They also enrich the methodology of geography, in which the most important uses of fractal geometry include: identification of the fractal dimension of point, linear and planar geographical objects, and fractal modelling of all kinds of socio-economic objects and phenomena. The present paper explores the latter avenues of research and is devoted to modelling hexagonal lattices in central place theory, spatial development of cities, and analysis of transport systems.

 

Reiffenstein, Tim (Session 1.10)
Department of Geography, Mount Allison University, Sackville, NB E4L 1A7, Canada; Email: treiffen@mta.ca

Writing knowledge across borders: patent attorneys and the authorization of intellectual property in Japan

Through a focus on patent intermediation, this paper recasts innovation as a persuasive art that involves a set of spatial practices for authoring, re-inscribing and authorizing novelty. Patent attorneys work at a critical intersection between the worlds of technology and law, public and private sectors, and increasingly national and international spaces. An examination of Japanese patent attorneys (benrishi) affords a window on the actor-network that comes together to write patents across jurisdictional spaces. This network is at once intensely local, particularly within certain neighborhoods of Tokyo, but it also operates at broader scales to translate patents across oceans and cultures.

 


Rigby, David1, Baldwin, John2 and Brown W. Mark2 (session 2.6)

1Dept of Geography, University of California Los Angeles LOS ANGELES, CA 90095, USA, 2Micro-Economic Analysis Division, Statistics Canada; Email: rigby@geog.ucla.edu

Measuring the sources of agglomeration economies: micro-data panel estimates from Canadian manufacturing

How much does geography matter to the performance of firms? Are the benefits of some locations as important to competitive advantage as the individual characteristics of business establishments themselves? What are the sources of increasing returns found in specific locations and do these agglomeration economies accrue to all types of establishments or only to some. These questions are examined using plant-level data for Canadian manufacturing. Analysis moves from cross-sectional models to fixed effects panel models to counter omitted variable bias. Results show local labor market matching, the density of buyer-supplier networks and clustering of own-industry plants significantly impact plant productivity.

 

Roberts, Susan (Session 2.2)

Dept. of Geography, University of Kentucky, 1457 Patterson Office Tower, Lexington, KY 40506-0027 USA; Email: sueroberts@uky.edu

Development is dead

What is happening to development in the present ‘security age’? What happens to ideas and ideals of development when poverty is no longer seen as a problem defined in terms of inequality nor humans’ basic needs and rights, but instead is re-defined through the security nexus in terms of risks and threats? Recent reorganizations in official US development institutions have enrolled development, perhaps more explicitly than ever, into foreign policy. Classically liberal ideas and ideals of development are being trumped by a mix of neoliberal, neoconservative, and realist logics. The paper considers these trends and their implications.

 

Rock, Melissa Yang (Session 4.19)

Department of Geography, 304 Walker Building, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 USA; Email: myrock@psu.edu

The makings of a modern Beijing: constructing images, transforming spaces

Beijing’s physical landscape and social arrangements have transformed into a confused patchwork mixing traditional and modern buildings, international businessmen and peasant migrants, not to mention a communist-socialist political ideology and market-based capitalist economy. This mixture of built form, demographic interface and ideology is a manifestation of the city’s struggle for a contemporary image. As Beijing prepares to host the 2008 Summer Olympic Games, the city faces internal and external pressure to transform into a modern metropolis. Through analysis of Beijing’s urban redevelopment and image-making process, this paper examines how place meanings are constructed through the dynamics of spatial configurations, representational discourses and social-economic institutions.

 

Röling, Robert (Session 4.21)

AMIDSt Amsterdam institute for Metropolitan and International Development Studies, Nieuwe Prinsengracht 130, 1018VZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Email: R.W.Roling@uva.nl

Multiple faces of the international advertising industry in the Amsterdam region

This paper focuses on the international advertising industry of the Amsterdam region. I will present a historical analysis of international advertising by describing four waves of advertising within 20th century capitalism. It was during the fourth wave (from the early 1990s onwards) that Amsterdam emerged as an increasingly important international advertising centre. The rise of Amsterdam coincides with changes in the organisational structure of the international advertising industry with both a tendency of de-concentration as small, flexible and independent international advertising agencies came to the fore as innovative players. The main research question is how the rise of Amsterdam is related to these two, seemingly contradictory changes in the structure of the international advertising industry? The key, as I argue, is to be found in the importance of the ‘project’, made up of a client network and creative networks with subcontractors, in advertising. Studying the project networks of both the global network advertising agencies and the independents of the Amsterdam advertising industry provides a strategic window on the processes of internationalisation. One of the early results is that the project networks of global network advertising agencies are, in general, nationally orientated, whereas the project networks of the small independents are much more international.

 

Rosales-Ortega, Rocio (Session 2.9)

Departamento de Sociología. Av. Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa. División de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades, Mexico

Email: rro63@att.net.mx

Feminizing economic geography: entrepreneurialism, networks and social capital

This paper reviews different approaches about entrepreneurialism and proposes a new way of analyzing women participation on the formation of enterprises. Based on the new economic sociology and its interlinkages with economic geography, we analyze the social construction of engendered networks which allow women to become micro and small entrepreneurs. In the Latin American context, this research approach becomes important given the predominance of research that attributes a great economic role to women’s unpaid labor, where women are mainly studied as community developers, or recently their role as professionals, but rarely women have been considered as key actors in the local development through their participation as entrepreneurs. This paper considers that an analysis of the relationship between women and entrepreneurial behavior has become a key issue in the understanding of today’s Mexican local economic processes.

 

Rusten, Grete, Bryson, John and Stabell, Mia (Session 4.18)
University of Bergen, SNF, Breiviksveien 40, 5045 Bergen Norway

Email: Grete.Rusten@snf.no

Offshoring and outsourcing by Norwegian organisations

This paper explores the motivations, preconditions, processes and experiences of offshoring within Norwegian private- and public-sector organisations especially focusing on business-to-business (B2B) activities. The paper begins with an overview of the literature and a conceptual discussion that explores differences in offshoring behaviour between the private and public sectors. The literatures on service industries, new public management, economic geography and management are combined in this analysis. The empirical analysis is based on case study interviews as well as secondary sources and includes an analysis of the factors connected to the purchasing of services from home or foreign markets. The continued development, adoption and integration of technologies will lead to an increase in global sourcing as more information becomes codified, automated and digitised. Language and cultural differences as well as different approaches to work may add additional costs for organisations that have arranged some activities through offshoring projects. The paper explores the process of sourcing as a result of market conditions and other drivers as well as how consultancy companies may be encouraging clients to introduce offshoring to their business models. Finally, the paper explores the ways in which offshored projects are integrated into the core business activities of firms.

 

Rutherford, Tod D. (Session 4.9)

Department of Geography, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244-1020 USA; Email: trutherf@maxwell.syr.edu

Institutional re-scaling, voice and innovation in clusters

In this paper I argue that the focus of learning and innovation research in economic geography on the inter-firm mobility of skilled workers or talent does not fully capture the dynamics of innovation. As an alternative but complementary research agenda, I stress the importance of organizational work practices, especially the mobilization of employee voice. Drawing on cluster examples from both ‘old economy’ automobile and new economy’ business services and multi-media industries, I argue for important complementarities between workplace voice and innovation that at the cluster scale. From these I identify critical institutional determinants of the voice-innovation relationship and how these are being rescaled. Greater externalization of employment, network formation and globalization, mean that national institutions have become less determining of voice, but especially in the European Union, multiple-voice and multiple scale governance structures are emerging.

 

Saarivirta, Toni (Session 2.17)

Research Unit for Urban and Regional Development Studies, University of Tampere, 33014 Finland; Email: Toni.Saarivirta@uta.fi
Self-renewal capacity and economic growth
This paper adopts the point of view that a crisis will face a person, organisation, region or country at some point. The question is how to prepare for the crises and recover from it afterwards? Some of us recover better from the crisis than others and, in addition, in a shorter time. The concept of self-renewal capacity will be introduced here as a tool to prepare for the future. Three economic theories (neoclassical growth theory, endogenous growth theory and evolutionary theory) are used here as catching points in search of self-renewal capacity.

 

Sadler, David and Lloyd, Stuart (Session 2.8)
Department of Geography, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZT, UK; Email: dsadler@liverpool.ac.uk

Neo-liberalising corporate social responsibility

This paper situates the rise of corporate social responsibility in the context of ‘rolling-out’ neoliberalisation. First we explore the rise of a CSR consultancy industry in the UK. Then global framework agreements on corporate behaviour (such as the World Economic Forum’s Global Corporate Citizenship Initiative) are interpreted as examples of how neo-liberalism is created in and through ‘in-between’ spaces that set the rules of political action. We connect NGO concerns on CSR with longer-term debates on corporate voluntarism versus state-centred regulation, and argue that it is important to examine the political nature of corporate social responsibility.

 


Saloma, Ana (Session 2.9)
Escuela Nacional de Antropología Historia , Periférico Sur y Zapote s/n Col. Isidro Fabela, Del Tlalpan, Cp 14300, México D.F.

Email: anasaloma@yahoo.com.mx

The tobacco female workers of Mexico City and the modernization of the cigarette industry from XVIII to XX th. century

At the end of twentieth century, it was appointed that human destiny was in order to becoming a global and modern world. In this world, linguistic and cultural diversity, next to regionalisms and nationalisms, are placed in order to disappear. In such a context, we should ask: when does the modernity begin? Which are the elements that define globalization? How does modernity impact, in historical moments, the different sectors of society according to a very specific location, ethnic and gender identity, and also in social class? In the current lecture, I select three key moments of the process of modernization in the Mexican tobacco industry. Then, I analyze the consequences of this process on female workers and their gender relationships.

 

Samers, Michael (Session 1.8)
Department of Geography, 1457 Patterson Office Tower, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40508 USA; Email: Michael.Samers@uky.edu

Islamic banking and the end of the geography of finance (as we knew it)

Islamic banking and finance is a phenomenon that is growing rapidly. Not only is it fueling the growth of cities in Muslim countries, but a burgeoning Islamic mortgage market has emerged in the UK and the US. A new Islamic calculus has created a contra-puntal global financial system, and is challenging the dominance of ‘conventional’ banking systems. I argue that it begs economic geographers – particularly those working in a Euro-North American context – to question the origins of economic geographical theory, and to ask the extent to which such theory continues to be an appropriate lens on the geography of finance.

 

Sanchez-Crispin, Alvaro and Liberali, Ana Maria (Session 1.4)
Institute of Geography, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, DF, CP 04510 Mexico City, Mexico

Email: ascrispin@yahoo.com

Recent research issues on economic geography in Latin America

The aim of this paper is to reveal the issues currently being explored by economic geographers based at different research centres throughout Latin America. While the study focuses primarily on the examination of the state-of-the-art in the largest countries, such as Brazil, Mexico and Argentina, where geographical research has a long tradition, facts are also provided for less known countries, such as Panama and Nicaragua, where Economic Geography research themes are being central to the local development of geographical knowledge. To do this, we gathered empirical data from the Latin American geographers’ bi-annual meetings and the Latin American Geographical Union.

 

Sarre, Philip (Session 1.13)
The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK11 1HN, UK

Email: p.v.sarre@open.ac.uk

What do we know about international capital movements?

Official statistics (collected by IMF, World Bank, Bank for International Settlements and UNCTAD) reflect as well as portray uneven development. A recent composite database (Lane and Milesi-Ferretti 2006) covers 145 countries over 35 years and identifies discrepancies between reported assets and liabilities that suggest substantial unrecorded flows. Unofficial analyses estimate that hundreds of billions of dollars are moved internationally, and often from poor to rich countries, through capital flight, transfer pricing and the opportunity costs of reserves. Increased transparency of flows through offshore financial centres would be a first step towards more reliable data. 

 

Sasanpour, Farzaneh (Session 1.16)
No.12 /South Khosh Street/ Tehran/ Iran
Email: far20_sasanpour@yahoo.com
Ecological footprint method in sustainability of metropolitans with considering Tehran as a metropolitan

In recent decades metropolitans like Tehran has encountered lots of problems, such as an increase in biological pollution, a decrease in ecological capacity, a decrease in carrying capacity, confiscation of supporter area resources, an increase burden on the environment and most importantly, unsustainable urban management practices in the preparation and control of city affairs, and all of these problems are evidences that show the ecological space of Tehran is becoming more unsustainable. Because of organic and systematic space in cities, results of this unsustainability on the one hand decrease the ecological capacity of metropolitan area and on the other hand cause unsustainability of the metropolitan region. This unsustainable ecological space with its current mode of production and consumption doesn't have the necessary power for meeting its population's main needs. At present, urban planning for a metropolitan like Tehran future expansion hasn't been considered, and accordance with the urbane management of this metropolitan, lacks the necessary tools for guidance and conformity of resident's urban life with ecological capacity of area. This article tries to offer a better management solution with scientific and executive views and an evaluation of the unsustainability and its reasons.

Sati, Vishwambhar Prasad (Session 1.6)

Government Post Graduate College, F-5, Professor Colony, Shivpuri, Madhya Pradesh, India; Email: vishwambhars@yahoo.co.uk

Economic development and environmental conditions in the fragile mountain terrain of Uttaranchal Himalaya, India

This paper examines the level of economic development and environmental conditions in the Uttaranchal Himalaya. The region is economically backward and ecologically fragile as the economy rests upon the cultivation of subsistence cereal crops, whose viability is very low in terms of production and productivity of the crops. Meanwhile, the natural hazards such as cloudburst, flash flood, soil erosion, landslide, and mass movement of geo-materials are very common. Human induced developmental activities further accelerate the intensity and dimension of these phenomena. The study suggests that a peculiar type of developmental planning should be framed and implemented for this region, keeping geo-environmental conditions in view, which will be economically viable and ecologically sound. Data has been gathered from the primary sources through case studies of selected villages and as well as from the secondary sources.

 

Scharmanski, André (Session 2.22)

Department of Economic and Social Geography, at the University of Cologne, Albertus-Magnus-Platz, 50923 Cologne, Germany

Email: scharmanski@wiso.uni-koeln.de

Local players and markets in a global real estate economy: the case of Mexico City and Sčo Paulo

Since the 1990s, the real estate economy has been changing from a locally embedded industry into a globally oriented one. In particular, the convergence of capital and real estate markets and the deregulation of national financial systems, new investment strategies and vehicles have led to rising cross-border investments. The paper focuses on the issue of how foreign investors get access to reliable information and networks in the real estate markets of Mexico City and Sčo Paulo and how the emergence of global capital and actors affect these markets. Do local players lose ground due to the internationalization process? Or does the importance of local actors become more apparent in markets where information is scarce and local practices are so different from what international investors may be used to?

 


Schueler, Daniela (Session 4.18)

Humboldt University Berlin, Unter den Linden 6, 10099 Berlin

Email: daniela.schueler@geo.hu-berlin.de

The service sector as after use on urban potential sites in shrinking cities- the example Berlin

Because of economic and demographic changes, Shrinking Cities are an emerging phenomenon in many countries all over the world. One result is the increasing number of potential sites in the cities, facing a decreasing demand for these sites. On the other hand, Services are the growing sector in many Cities. The research project in this field of urban land management describes the problem of increasing potential sites and shows – as the result of the investigation - which potential sites are best for a service development.

 

Schlunze, Rolf1 and Plattner, Michael2 (Session 4.16)
1Ritsumeikan University, Faculty of Management, Department of International Management, 1-1-1 Nogi-higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga, 525-8577 Japan, 2Human and Regional Geography, Campus II, University of Trier, 54286 Trier, Germany; Email: plattner@uni-trier.de

Mobile elite in the global city - international managers' practices and their locational preferences
Relocation and concentration of globally linked business operations are closely connected to the lifestyles of foreign executive managers. This study analyzes foreign executive managers' lifestyles and locational preferences. The approach developed distinguishes types of executive managers by evaluating their potential for creating cultural synergy. This study applies conjoint analysis to quantify executive locational preferences. The study led to interviews of 47% of the study population, 58 individuals. The analysis shows significant differences in the lifestyles of expatriate and hybrid managers. Executives' preferences regarding first and second tier locations show significant correlation with their creation of synergies.

 

Schuldt, Nina1 and Bathelt, Harald (Session 4.4)

1University of Marburg, Deutschhausstrasse 10, 35032 Marburg, Germany; Email: nina.schuldt@t-online.de

Temporary face-to-face contact and the ecology of global buzz

International trade fairs bring together agents from all over the world and create temporary spaces of presentation and interaction. They produce a rich ecology of information flows about the dynamics of global production chains within a specific institutional setting, referred to as ‘global buzz’. This buzz allows agents to act as both recipients and broadcasters of information and knowledge flows through face-to-face contact. New information is repeatedly interpreted, evaluated and enriched with additional relevant information. ‘Global buzz’ and shared institutions support the reduction of uncertainties and help firms distinguish important from less important information. This paper analyses the various aspects of ‘global buzz’ drawing from empirical evidence collected during seven national and international trade fairs in Germany.

 

Seo, Bongman (Session 1.8)
Graduate School of Economics, Hitotsubashi University, 2-1 Naka Kunitachi, Tokyo 186-8601 Japan; Email: seob@econ.hit-u.ac.jp

Market growth and network dynamics in financial markets: comparison between Europe and Asia
This paper examines the ways in which liberalization and growth of home and regional markets affected the performance of European banks and Japanese banks. Two changes in demand conditions in Europe contributed to the rise of European banks in their home markets and other regional markets. However, Japanese banks could not sustain their competitiveness in their home/regional markets against foreign competitors. I suggest that liberalization and growth of home and regional markets have not always contributed to improved performance by home/regional financial firms and liberalization policies thus should be carefully implemented considering competitiveness of home financial firms against foreign competitors.

 

Seo, Yeonmi (Session 2.16)

Department of Geography, Seoul National University, San 56-1 Shinlim-dong, Kwanak-ku, SEOUL 151-742, South Korea

Email: ymseo98@snu.ac.kr

Internationalization and localization of Korean SMEs in Silicon Valley

This study aims to understand the internationalization and the localization of Korean SMEs in Silicon Valley(SV) including affiliates or subsidiaries whose parent-companies are located in Korea. For an empirical study, in-depth interviews were conducted with 20 Korean affiliates or subsidiaries (KASs). This study investigates the internalization of KASs in SV in three aspects: 1) process of entry, 2) core activities, and 3) spatial distribution of internal organization. The localisation of KASs in SV is examined through their industrial networks and innovation activities. The findings of this study show that regions are still important to a firm’s innovation activities even amidst increasing globalization of MNCs.

 


Sharma, Sukanya (Session 2.16)

Dept. Of Humanities and Social Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati-781039; Email: sukanya@iitg.ernet.in

Indo-Myanmar trade through Northeast India

The Northeastern part of India has forever suffered the stigma of being ‘landlocked’, ‘undeveloped’, ‘marginalised’ etc. The main objective of the paper is to understand if improved trade relations with Myanmar and thence with Southeast Asia can free Northeast India from this stigma. 98% of its boundaries are international boundaries while it is connected to India by a narrow strip of land. Is the stigma the result of the existence of these international borders? What was the situation before these international borders had come up? Can we transform these borders from being ‘vulnerable peripheries’ to vibrant ‘economic corridors’?

 

Sheppard, Eric and Leitner, Helgar (Session 1.3)

Department of Geography, 414 social sciences tower, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis MN 55455, USA; Email: shepp001@umn.edu

The spatialities of contentious politics

Those contesting neoliberalism, free trade, and other hegemonic practices of market-led globalization, have been consistently creative in developing spatialized strategies to advance their diverse interests and subjectivities. Indeed, they transcend the hide-bound debates about spatiality in economic geography that lurch from place to scale to networks and mobility, in a vain search for the foolproof spatial trope. Social movements draw on and manipulate places, challenge scales, connect unexpectedly across space, and are on the move. Socio-spatial positionality provides a gateway into comprehending how such spatialities are co-implicated with one another, in the socio-natural spatio-temporalities of real-world contentious politics.

 

Shin, Michael (Session 2.6)
UCLA – Department of Geography, 1255 Bunche Hall, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1524, USA; Email: shinm@geog.ucla.edu

Globalization and the Mezzorgiorno: a fourth Italy?

Terms such as ‘backwards’ and ‘underdeveloped’ have long been used to characterize the society, politics, culture and economy of the Mezzogiorno, or southern Italy. The extent to which such terms accurately and appropriately describe the Italian south remains a subject of debate. This paper explores and examines the contemporary economic position and trajectory of the Mezzogiorno by situating it into Italian, European and global contexts. Results from exploratory spatial data analyses (ESDA) suggest that a geographically nuanced consideration of the Mezzogiorno may yield useful insights that can inform future examinations of the southern Italian economy.

 

Skytt, Christine Benna and Lars Winther (Session 2.23)
Department of Geography. University of Copenhagen, Įster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K, Denmark

Email: cbs@geogr.ku.dk; lw@geogr.ku.dk

Firms in knowledge producing projects: personal and system trust in the mechatronic industry in the SŅnderborg region, Denmark

The focus on knowledge economy in economic geography necessitates an understanding of temporary coalitions as emerging relational spaces of knowledge production. In temporary coalitions trust and mutual trust enhanced by geographical proximity have been argued to be necessary mechanisms producing and transmitting knowledge among actors. The concept of trust in this line of argumentation is not fully unfolded, conceptualised or operationalised. In the paper trust is elaborated and two different but interrelated forms of trust – personal trust and system trust – are identified. The different theoretical conceptualizations are then used in a case study to show how different forms of trust come into play at different scales (micro and macro spaces) in temporary coalitions.

 

Smith, Bruce1, Reid, Neil, Carroll, Michael and Lindquist, Peter (Session 2.7)
1Department of Geography, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 43403; Email: bsmith4@bgsu.edu

U.S. floriculture: an industry under threat

The focus of this paper is the U.S. floriculture industry. The paper examines changing trade flows in floriculture between the U.S. and Canada. The last ten years has witnessed a widening trade imbalance in floriculture products between the US and Canada. U.S. floriculture exports to Canada have remained flat, while Canadian floriculture imports to the US have increased significantly. The increasing penetration of Canadian floriculture products into the US has the potential to negatively impact the floriculture industry of particular regions of the US. This paper attempts to identify which regions are most under threat from Canadian floriculture imports.

 

Smith, Christopher J. and Himmelfarb, Katie M. G. (Session 2.2)
Dept of Geography and Planning, University at Albany, SUNY, New York, USA 12222; Email: cjsmith@albany.edu

‘Actually existing’ olympism: Beijing’s 2008 games and China’s neoliberal project

The 2008 Beijing Olympic Games have been the subject of much speculation, with political liberalization and democratization often discussed as potential outcomes, because of the Olympic movement’s purported compatibility with the promotion of universal human rights and the elimination of discrimination. The powerful ideology of ‘Olympism’ has much in common with the increasingly widespread phenomenon of neoliberalism: a shared vocabulary of individual liberty, competition, and achievement, and an uneven record in promoting or accepting those values in reality. This paper examines the geographic impacts of the lead-up to the Games in Beijing and finds that they have had mixed, but overall negative, effects on social justice, as understood in spatial terms.

 

Sofer, Michael and Applebaum, Levia (Session 4.7)

Department of Geography and Environment, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel 52900; Email: soferm1@mail.biu.ac.il

Unequal local development in the Israeli rural space
This paper discusses the growing polarisation within the Israeli rural space and its possible explanatory factors. It attributes this process to the weakening of equalisation mechanisms which were at the core of Israeli rural settlement, the increasing polarisation of Israeli society and the selective penetration of external capital into rural areas. The polarisation is often expressed spatially, supported by differential locational features, selective policies and investments, and socio-cultural, demographic and organizational characteristics of rural communities. Disparities are maintained and possibly expanding due to the slow transformation of peripheral versus more central regions of the country. The long-range implications may reflect on future development policies for rural communities, inhabitants and economic activities.

 

Song, Zhouying, Liu, Weidong and Liu, Yi (Session 2.5)

Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Room 1521, 11A, Datun Road, Anwai Beijing 100101, China

Email: songzy.06b@igsnrr.ac.cn
New information and communication technologies (ICTs) in local clusters of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs): a case study of the shoes’ cluster in Wenling, Zhejiang province
It is now widely recognized that new information and communication technologies (ICTs) have become increasingly important for firms to achieving competitiveness in the context of globalization. Examples are the application of new ICTs to help firms overcome the spatial and institution barriers, reduce transaction costs and increase flexibility, and invent new marketing channels. As a result and reasonablyso, new ICTs have played a special role in the growth of SMEs, whose major obstacles to survival and expansion are the lack of internal technological capability and marketing and information channels. With such a background, this paper uses the Shoes’ Cluster in Wenling, Zhejiang Province as a case study to focus on the role of new ICTs in SMEs’ growth. We then try to analyse the spatial features of new ICTs in China The study reveals that the role of new ICTs in local SMEs industrial clusters depends on a number of factors, such as region, industry, enterprise and institutions.

 

Sonn, Jung Won (Session 1.10)

Bartlett School of Planning, University College London, Wates House, 22 Gordon Street London WC1H OQB, UK; Email: j.son@ucl.ac.uk

Inter-urban convergence with increasing return to scale? An analysis of the urban dimension of U.S. patenting

Recent theoretical and empirical efforts to understand the urban dimension of knowledge production have found that larger cities are more innovative. At the same time, empirical studies exist that show a converging number of patents per capita among cities. This paper attempts to reconcile these two seemingly contradictory findings. My main finding is that both inter-urban convergence and an increasing return to scale exist. What this means is that the convergence in patenting per capita occurs only among cities of comparable sizes while the divergence across different sizes increases.

 

Sotarauta, Markku (Session 2.17)

Research Unit for Urban and Regional Development Studies, University of Tampere, Kanslerinrinne 1, FIN-33014 University of Tampere, Finland

Email: markku.sotarauta@uta.fi

Local innovation policy from an evolutionary perspective: is self-renewal capacity a key?

This paper suggests that in evolutionary local innovation policy we need to focus on directed emergence where the nexus of intentionality and freely emerging processes is the crucial target of attention. The main aim of this paper is to develop the concept of self-renewal capacity firstly for future empirical analysis of co-evolution of policy-intention and emergence, and secondly for policy-makers so that they would have alternative conceptual tools to understand their roles in long unfolding development processes. This paper examines such questions as how real change is stimulated in regions, and more specifically, how localised adaptation processes, institutions and intention of a policy-network drive strategic renewal? Hence the discussion centres on what are the key-elements of self-renewal capacity of regions. Self-renewal capacity represents a set of processes that can be intentionally designed for the future on the one hand, but that are the core of adaptation on the other hand.

 


Stachowiak, Krzysztof (Session 4.1)

Adam Mickiewicz University, Institute of Socio-Economic Geography and Spatial Management, ul. Dziegielowa 27, PL 61-680 Poznan Poland

Email: krst@amu.edu.pl

Changing rules, permanent business: the institutional environment for business activity in a transforming economy (the case of Poland)

The paper explores the interrelationship between the rapidly changing institutional environment in a transforming economy and business activity. The dynamic transition of a socialist economy into a market one induces numerous changes not only in economic conditions but also in the rules determining the way of conducting business. Institutions could either facilitate business or make it more difficult. This paper shows, using the example of Poland in the context of Central and Eastern Europe, how the institutional environment has changed during the transition and what influence it has had and might have on business activity. The focus is on different spatial scales (from regional to international). By employing the institutional framework for the analysis, the peculiarity of the transition economy is emphasized.

 

Sternberg, Rolf1 and Mueller, Claudia (Session 4.16)

1Institute of Economic and Cultural Geography, University Hannover, Schneiderberg 50, 30167 Hannover, Germany

Email: sternberg@wigeo.uni-hannover.de

‘New argonauts’ in Shanghai
Recently, Saxenian (2006) has shown that the entrepreneurial dynamism of Silicon Valley has significantly benefited from so-called ‘new argonauts’ – well-educated young people from Taiwan, China or Korea who left their respective home country because of unfavourable economic and/or political conditions in order to study in the US. Later many of these people move back in order to start up new knowledge-intensive firms. We analyse the role of the local and international linkages of such return migrants for local economic development. Empirical findings are based on a recent qualitative survey based on Chinese return migrants (mainly from the US) who have started a biotech firm in Shanghai. Our results show that these ‘argonauts’ help their home country overcome some of the typical disadvantages of late-comer economies. This seems to be true even in relatively advanced regional economies like Shanghai in China.

 


Stryjakiewicz, Tadeusz (Session 2.14)

Adam Mickiewicz University, Institute of Socio-Economic Geography and Spatial Management, ul. Dziegielowa 27, PL 61-680 Poznan Poland

Email: tadek@amu.edu.pl

Geography of the Polish transition

The process of transition which started in Poland (and the other countries of Central and Eastern Europe) after the breakdown of the communist system in 1989 has many dimensions. One of them is a spatial dimension. Gradually new 'regional geographies' are being shaped, and there emerge regions which can be called the winners and the losers of the transition. The aim of this paper is to identify, analyse and make generalisations about the following issues: main factors influencing the process of transition, regional differences in the pattern of this process, some mechanisms determining the process (such as new forms of business networking), and future challenges. The process of transformation of the socio-economic system has not only petrified the old differences in Polish space, but also created favourable conditions for forces leading to an increase in inter-regional disparities. They are best discernible in two dimensions: western vs. eastern regions, and metropolitan vs. rural areas. The discrepancies are supposed to be diminished by regional policy modified after Poland's accession to the European Union in 2004. However, it is too early yet to assess its results fully.

 

Su, I-Jhy1 and Yang, You-Ren2 (Session 4.4)
1Tainan National University of the Arts, No.66, Taichi, Kuantien, 72045, Taiwan, Taiwan, 2National Taiwan University

Email: suijhy@mail.tnnua.edu.tw

Beyond Marshallian industrial district: the trans-scalar spatial-organizational formation of TFT-LCD cluster in Taiwan

This paper aims to explain the spatial-organizational characteristics of southern Taiwan’s TFT-LCD cluster—i.e., the non-Marshallian industrial district— from the perspective of trans-scalar technological-organizational strategies. First, we argue that it’s hard to explain the technical interaction of TFT-LCD industry between Japan and Taiwan from the thesis of state intervention or informal technical community. Second, we highlight a specific mode of quasi-vertical integration in explaining the spatial-organizational formation of the TFT-LCD cluster. Finally, this paper will dialogue with the models of industrial district as well as modularization, and further conceptualize the dynamics of such geographical formation.

 


Sun, Yifei (Session 1.11)
Department of Geography, California State University, Northridge, Northridge, CA 91330, USA; Email: Yifei.sun@csun.edu

Institution, power and actor: understanding environmental challenges of foreign R&D operations in China

This study examines the challenges of foreign R&D in China, based on interviews with a number of senior R&D managers. It confirms the findings from previous studies that many barriers still exist in China for foreign R&D, and such barriers include institutional environment, infrastructure and labor management. Among the three categories, issues related labor management, such as increasing labor cost and mobility, lack of experience and creativity and cultural differences among the research staff, show to be most challenging for management, while China’s institution and infrastructure largely have been aligned up with those in many other countries. This study also finds that responses from R&D managers are not consistent, and the differences could be largely explained by three types of factors: relational distance between the parent country and China, the strength and experience of foreign companies, and manager’s personal experience and closeness with China.

 

Szul, Roman (Session 1.7)
University of Warsaw, Centre for European Regional and Local Studies,ul. Krakowskie Przedmiescie 30, 00-927 Warsaw, Poland

Email: r.szul@chello.pl

European integration and its impact on regional policy and regional governance, with special reference to Poland

European integration implies a certain impact of the EU on regional policies at national level as well as on regional government and governance in EU-member states or candidates. The latter consists in stimulating decentralization of governance. This process called ‘Europeanization’ was strongly felt by the EU-candidates. One of them was Poland. This was manifested in greater attention paid to regional policy and to regional government and in a reform of government introduced in 1999, whose principal element was establishment of large regions supplied with a degree of administrative autonomy. At the beginning the new regions were mostly negligible in the general governance and political system of the state. Recently, as the (mostly EU) funds to be channelled through regions are growing considerably, the political weight of regions is also growing and their relations with the central government are also changing.

 


Tacconelli, Wance (Session 4.3)

School of Geography, University of Southampton, University road, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK; Email: W.Tacconelli@soton.ac.uk

Organisational challenges and strategic responses of retail TNCs in China

In the context of the globalisation of retail in emerging markets, I investigate the organisational challenges and strategic responses of the retail TNCs operating in China’s transitional economy. In particular, by focusing on recent conceptualizations of the retail TNCs that stress their necessarily high territorial embeddedness in host countries’ markets and cultures of consumption, planning property systems and logistical and supply chain operations (Wrigley et al. 2005), I discuss the strategic moves adopted by some retail TNCs with regard to these dimensions in China.

 

Taleshi, Mostafa (Session 2.18)

Geo Dept., Payam Nour Univ., Fariman, 93914-33, Iran

Email: taleshi_mo@yahoo.com

Destruction of natural sources and sustainable rural development

The revival of the natural sources is one of the essential resources in the susceptible mountainous environments. In this paper, we initially study how the natural resources destruction has been occurred in the rural settlements of Aladagh area (in the northeast of Iran) during a period of 20 years old. Afterwards, we use some participating planning patterns in order to give advice on preventing the natural resource destruction and to aid in establishing some complementally economic operations; these recommendations would pave the road for sustainable development in the rural areas.

 

Tan, Hung-Jen (Session 4.7)
Department of Geography, National Taiwan Normal University162, Ho-ping E. Rd. Sec. 1, Taipei 106, Taiwan
; Email: brucetan@ntnu.edu.tw

Rural development and relational spaces: a case of the tea industry in Longtan

Tea industry could date back to 19th century in Taiwan. Taiwan exported oolong, black tea and green tea to Europe, America South-East Asia and Middle East and most of which were produced in Northern Taiwan. The paper documents and discusses how Longtan faces developmental pressures and produces different commodities. In the first place, Longtan exported tea with a Fordist mode of production and formed a relational spaces with foreign markets. This was a result regulated by state intervention. However, with the need of rural labor of the state and emergence foreign competitors, a new regulation has been formed. The reason why local development transforms is because it loses the competitive advantages, which will change spatial relations. Longtan loses its commodity advantages, with tea farms shrinking, production declining and labor out-migrating. In response, it has two strategies to change commodity and form new spatial relations. The paper argues that local conventions, in addition to the production-consumption collaboration, play an important part in the formation of relational spaces.

 

Tan, Swee Ean (Session 2.22)
University Science of Malaysia, 22B-8-G, Greenlane Park, Solok Tembaga 11600 Penang, West Malaysia; Email: anntanse@yahoo.co.uk

Japanese foreign direct investment in manufacturing sector in Malaysia: a case Study of Penang (1991-2000)

This paper examines the Japanese manufacturing firms, which are registered and located in Penang from the year 1991 to 2000. The primary data, with a total of 39%, has been obtained from the population of 92 Japanese manufacturing factories in Penang. Penang, which is an investment location has its own FDI attraction force and uniqueness. The factors of stable politic, friendly atmosphere and investment tourism have successfully attracted the Japanese investors. The empirical findings show that the adaptation of local labour towards the mass production technology is fast and excellent. The power of purchase in the China market opens up the business opportunities in various fields. Though the labour cost in China is cheap, the great challenges they have to face are communication in English and quality production. Hence the intensive competition is leaning towards other ASEAN countries instead of Malaysia. This is due to the skillful and English-speaking labour force in Malaysia. The problems of the rapid increase of labour cost and the shortage of manufacturing electrical engineers and software engineers need to be resolved in order to sustain the Japanese FDI for a longer term in Penang.

 

Tang, Yi Shin (Session 4.14)

Univeristy of Turin – Italy, Via Real Collegio 30, 10024 Moncalieri (To) – Italy; Email: yishin.tang@unito.it

Technological innovation, state rationality and design of international agreements: constraints affecting global transfers of technology

This paper proposes to examine how the coordination of state interests may actually interfere in the conclusion of international agreements for the particular market of technology transfers. The process of designing international regulations is here modeled after bargaining theories that regard national states as players with stable preferences. Since this approach allows a clear identification of certain transactions costs that cause inefficient outcomes in these kinds of negotiations, we argue that a proper manipulation of negotiation strategies could substantially reduce such costs and lead to improved institutional arrangements in the global geography of technology dissemination.

 

Tamasy, Christine (Session 4.20)
School of Geography, Geology & Environmental Science (SGGES), The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand

Email: c.tamasy@auckland.ac.nz
Why does geography matter? Growing a global company from New Zealand

A question often posed by geographers is whether remote regions and economic actors, due to geographic isolation, have to face limits to growth in a globalising world economy. The example of the New Zealand dairy industry and Fonterra Co-operative Ltd, the New Zealand-based dairy giant (ranked No 5 in the world in terms of revenue), illustrates why geography does matter, but not as usually understood. The presentation focuses initially on the apparently constrained development of New Zealand’s dairy industry in the context of geo-political and regulatory change. It then details how Fonterra and the New Zealand dairy industry, working with industry seasonality, lengthy supply chains to major markets and restrictions on market-access, have continued to expand internationally through a series of innovative strategies.

 

Tavallai, Simin (Session 1.6)
D
ep of Geography, Teacher Training University , No 49 , Mofateh Ave, Tehran, Iran; Email: simintt@yahoo.com

Economic systems versus environmental issues

The magnitude of the environmental utilization is being affected by the nature of the economic system. Consumer enjoyment and satisfaction, the existence of the perfectly rational individual –one who wishes to maximize his utility –and the value based structure of capitalism economic system could well impact the magnitude of environmental utilization, preservation, conservation, degradation, and its negative externalities. However, it is argued that the religious –oriented economic systems in general, and Islamic economic system in particular, due to their very nature could well control environmental utilization toward minimal negative impacts. In fact, Islam as a viable religion is pre –occupied by enriched moral and spiritual pr